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COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS

COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS

The First Question is Comprehension Passage. A passage from the text will be given and 5 or 6 variety questions to answer. The questions may be (1) Comprehension questions (2) Vocabulary

(3) Diary writing (4) Message Writing (5) Dialogue Writing etc. Let us see an Example

Read the extract from the story 'Father's Help and answer the questions that follow:

As he approached the yellow building he realized that he was perjuring himself and was ruining his teacher. Probably the headmaster would dismiss Samuel and then the police would chain him and put him in jail. For all this disgrace, humiliation and suffering, who would be responsible? Swami shuddered. The more he thought of Samuel, the more he grieved for him...

1.'Swami realized that he was perjuring himself and was ruining his teacher.' What does this statement suggest about the nature of Swami?

2.Pick out an expression which means 'to shake because you are frightened' from the extract.

3.What, Swami fears, will be the consequences of delivering the letter to the headmaster?

4.Look at the expression:

The more he thought of Samuel, the more he grieved for him. Complete the following suitably.

a.The more he thought of his father, __________________

b.The weaker Swami became, __________________

ANSWERS

1.Swami had told a lie to his father about Mr. Samuel. He felt a guilty feeling for this.

2.Shudder

3.the Headmaster would dismiss Samuel and the police would chain him and put him in jail.

4 a) The more he thought of his father,the more he was confused.

b) The weaker Swami became, thegreater he was frightened.

Read the extract from the story 'Father's Help and answer the questions that follow:

At 9.30, when he ought to have been shouting in the school prayer hall, Swami was lying on the bench in Mother's room. Father asked him, 'Have you no school today?'

'Headache,' Swami replied. 'Nonsense! Dress up and go.' 'Headache.'

'Loaf about less on Sundays and you will be without a headache on Monday.' Swami knew how stubborn his father could be and changed his tactics. 'I can't go so late to the class.'

'I agree, but you'll have to; it is your own fault. You should have asked me before deciding to stay away.'

'What will the teacher think if I go so late?' 'Tell him you had a headache and so are late.'

'He will beat me if I say so.' 'Will he? Let us see.'

1.What would Swami usually do during prayer time at school?

2.What, according to Father, is the cause of Swami's headache?

3.Complete the sentence given below suitably.

If Swami had said ‘headache’ once again, his father _________________

4.Do you think Swami is honest in his words? Justify your answer citing instances from the passage.

ANSWERS

1.Usually Swamy would shout during the prayer time at school.

2.Wasting his time on week-ends too much is the reason for Swamy's headache.

3.If Swamy had said headache once again his father would beaten him.

4.No Swamy is not honest. He is just palying a truant. Swamy changed his tactics.

Read the paragraph from 'Father's Help' and answer the questions that follow.

Swami cast his mind about for an instance of this. There was none within his knowledge. Years and years ago he was reputed to have skinned the knuckles of a boy in first standard. And made him smear the blood on his face. No one had actually seen it.

1.Pick out the phrase that means 'searched the mind'.

2.'Years and years ago he was reputed'..... Who is 'he' here?

3.What is the hearsay about the teacher?

ANSWERS

1.Cast his mind.

2.Mr. Samuel

3.The hearsay is that Mr. Samuel was reputed to have

skinned the knuckles of a boy in first standard and made him smear the blood on his face.

Read the extract from the story Games at Twilight and answer the questions that follow:

Ravi sat back on the harsh edge of the tub, deciding to hold out a bit longer. What fun if they were all found and caught - he alone left unconquered! He had never known that sensation. Nothing more wonderful had ever happened to him than being taken out by an uncle and bought a whole slab of chocolate all to himself. There he sat smiling, knocking his heels against the bathtub, now and then getting up and going to the door to put his ear to the broad crack. and listening for sounds of the game, the pursuer and the pursued and then returning to his seat with the dogged determination of the true winner, a breaker of records, a champion.

1.What, according to Ravi, is the greatest fun of hiding in the desolate shed?

2.What present does Ravi dream of being gifted with when he becomes the champion?

3.Who are the pursuer and the pursued referred to in the passage?

4.Which expression in the passage is suggestive of Ravi's strong decision to win the game?

5.How does Ravi express his happiness though impatiently waiting in the shed?

ANSWERS

1.According to Ravi the fun is that if they were all found and caught, he alone left unconquered.

2.Ravi dreams that he would be given with a whole slab of chocolate by his uncle .

3.Reghu is the pursuer and Ravi and the others are the pursued.

4.Returning to his seat with a dogged determination of the true winner, a breaker of records, a champion .

5.There he sat smiling, knocking his heels against the bathtub, now and then getting up and going to the door to

put his ear to the broad crack. and listening for sounds of the game.

Read the extract from the story 'The Blue Bouquet' and answer the questions that follow:

“My eyes? What are you going to do with my eyes? Look, I've got a little money on me. Not much, but it's something. I'll give you everything I've got if you'll let me go. Don't kill me.' 'You shouldn't be scared, senior I'm not going to kill you. I just want your eyes.' 'But what do you want them for?' 'It's my sweetheart's idea. She'd like to have a bouquet of blue eyes. There aren't many people around here that have them.' 'Mine won't do you any good. They aren't blue, they're light brown.'

1.Why did the stranger try to pluck the narrator's eyes?

2.What offer did the narrator make to save himself from the man?

3.Complete the following sentence suitably

If the man let the narrator go, he _______________

4.Do you think that the stranger's sweetheart really asked for a bouquet of blue eyes? Why?

ANSWERS

1.He wanted to make a bouquet of blue eyes for his sweetheart.

2.The narrator offered all the money to the man to save himself.

3.If the man let the narrator go, he would give him all the money.

4.No, No women will ever say her lover to make a bouquet of blue eyes. She might have meant a bouquet of blue eye flowers.

Read the extract from the story 'The Blue Bouquet' and answer the questions that follow:

I shrugged my shoulders, mumbled, 'I'll be right back,' and went out into the darkness. At first I couldn't see anything at all. I groped my way along the stone-paved street. I lit a cigarette. Suddenly the moon came out from behind a black cloud, lighting up a weather-beaten white wall. I stopped in my tracks, blinded by that whiteness. A faint breeze stirred the air and I could smell the fragrance of the tamarind trees. The night was murmurous with the sounds of leaves and insects. The crickets had bivouacked among the tall weeds. I raised my eyes: up there the stars were also camping out. I thought that the whole universe was a grand system of signals, a conversation among enormous beings. My own actions, the creak of a cricket, the blinking of a star, were merely pauses and syllables, odd fragments of that dialogue.

I was only one syllable, of only one word.

1.Who are engaged in the dialogue referred to in the passage?

2.'I was only one syllable, of only one word.' What does it signify?

3.What quality of the night is felt quite striking for the narrator?

4.Classify the following group of words into two heads as shown below.

the moon, came out from behind, a faint breeze, my own actions, raised my eyes, shrugged my shoulder

the moon

came out from behind

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.The Hotel keeper and the narrator.

2.The narrators voice/ the narrator himself.

3.The stars that were camping out.

4. The moon

came out from behind

A faint breeze

raised my eyes

My own actions

shrugged my shoulders

(Classify as Noun Phrase & Verb Phrase)

Read the extract from the story 'The Blue Bouquet' and answer the questions that follow:

Without turning my head I asked, 'What do you want?

'Your eyes, senor,' His voice was strangely gentle, almost embarrassed. 'My eyes? What are you going to do with my eyes? Look I've got little money on me. Not much, but it's something. I'll give you everything I've got if you'll let me go. Don't kill me.'

'You shouldn't be scared, senor. I'm not going to kill you. I just want your eyes.' 'But what do you want them for?' It's my sweetheart's idea. She'd like to have a bouquet of blue eyes. Ther aren't many people here that have them.' Mine won't do you any good. They aren't ble, they're light brown.'

1.Which word/words in the excerpt tells you that the stranger was not at all confident in placing his demand?

2.Would you agree with the statement that the stranger is a passionate lover? Why?

3.How does the narrator try to save his life from the stranger?

4. Read the piece of conversation between the narrator and the stranger and answer the questions that follow:

Narrator

:

'What do you want my eyes for?'

Stranger

:

'It's my sweetheart's idea.'

a)What did the narrator ask the stranger?

b)What was the narrators reply?

1.His voice was strangely gentle, almost embarrassed.

2.Yes. He went in search of blue eyes to make a bouquet of blue eyes for his sweetheart.

3.By giving the little money he had.

4.a) The narrator asked the stranger what he wanted his eyes for.

5.The stranger replied that it was his sweet heart's idea.

Read the following passage from ‘Tea-shops in Malayalam Cinema’ and answer the questions that follow.

A customer at a tea-shop was regarded as simply an individual, not as a member of particular caste or community. These individuals were also, in a sense, self- exiled from their families. Persons who were considered worthless or insignificant in their families often achieved a certain dignity at a tea-shop. In serving as a space for free interaction of individuals who come from diverse social backgrounds, a tea-shop is no different from a cinema theatre. The atmosphere of a tea-shop often becomes tastier than the tea and snacks served!It is, therefore, not surprising that tea-shops played and continue to play, a significant role in energising the narrative of many Malayalam films.

1.What does the expression ‘simply an individual’ imply?

2.Why is the tea-shop a favourite hang-out for some people?

3.How, according to the author, does the tea-shop energise the narrative of many Malayalam films?

4.What sort of people are considered ‘worthless and insignificant’ in their families?

5.How, according to the author is ‘a tea-shop no different from a theatre’?

6.Categorise the words given in brackets into two and complete the table below. (insignificant, particular, regard, diverse, consider, come)

ANSWERS

1.No individual was given any preference on the basis of his caste or community.

2.Persons who were considered worthless and insignificant in their families often achieved certain dignity at a tea shop.

3.The tea shop is a secular space through which characters who come from diverse social background can have interaction.

4.Those people who rebelled the existing custom of the society were considered worthless and insignificant.

5.People from diverse social background come at a theatre as well as a tea shop. Both serves as a secular space.

5. come

particular

Regard

insignificant

Consider

particular

(Classified as Verb Phrase and Adjectival Phrase

Read the following passage from ‘Tea-shops in Malayalam Cinema’ and answer the questions that follow.

The small wayside restaurants located mostly in villages and popularly known as ‘tea-shops’, played a crucial role in making panthibhojanam a way of life in Kerala. The tea-shops were the products of two important social changes that were taking place at the time. One was the increasing freedom of movement in public spaces acquired by the depressed sections of society. The other was the emergence of an economy based on money. The tea-shop came into existence at a time when wages began to be paid in cash, rather than in kind. It was also the time when people were beginning to travel beyond the boundaries of their villages to sell what they produced in their fields or small workshops.

1.

In what ways do ‘tea-shops’ play a crucial role in Kerala’s social life?

2.

When, according to the author, did tea-shops become a common thing in Kerala?

3.Look at the sentence, ‘One was the increasing freedom of movement in public spaces acquired by the depressed sections of society.’ In the sentence ‘one’ is used instead of a noun phrase. Write the noun phrase that can replace ‘one’ in the sentence.

4.How were wages paid in the past? Cite an example for such a payment system.

5.What picture of the social life of Kerala in those days do you get from the passage

ANSWERS

1. The tea shops played a crucial role in making

panthibhojanam one of the earliest reformation a way of life in Kerala.

2.Increasing freedom of movement in public spaces acquired by the depressed sections of the society and the emergence of an economy based on money made the tea- shops a common thing in Kerala.

3.It

4.Wages were paid in kind rather than in cash. This system is called Barter System.

5.Kerala in the early 20th century was a caste ridden society. The

depressed section of the society did not have the freedom of movement. Wages were paid in kind rather than cash.

Read the following passage from ‘Tea-shops in Malayalam Cinema’ and answer the questions that follow.

The tea-shop represents a time and space free from the drudgery of work, and therefore teems with a wide cross-section of society. Along with genial villagers, one also finds local toughs, political workers and, of course, a host of strangers at the tea-shop. The sheer variety of the customers and the possible activities - reading newspapers, exchanging local news, discussing politics, gossiping or just chatting - makes the tea-shop an ideal place to reveal the ‘messages’ and concerns of the film. In every film which depicts the conflict between the individual/family and society, the tea-shop, one can say, is a prominent character.

1.Why is ‘tea-shop’ a favourite space for many customers?

2.What purpose do tea-shop scenes serve in films?

3.The variety of food served in a local tea-shop is very limited. But it offers other two varieties. What are they?

4.Cite an instance each from the passage in which the linking word ‘and’ connects two noun phrases.

5.Find out from the passage the word which is opposite in meaning to ‘conceal’.

ANSWERS

1.The tea-shop represents a time and space free from the drudgery of work,and therefore teems with a wide cross- section of society.

2.The sheer variety of the customers and the possible activities makes the tea-shop an ideal place to reveal the ‘messages’ and concerns of the film.

3.It is a time and space free from drudgery of work. The sheer variety of customers and the possible activities.

4.The sheer variety of customers and the possible

activities.

5. conceal X reveal

Read the following passage from 'Sunshine through the Rain' and answer the questions that follow.

A forest. Tall trees are clearly visible through a thin mist. The trees and the thin undergrowth of grass are lit up by bright sunshine that falls in beams through the gaps in the canopies of the trees. The boy appears. He walks up and faces the camera. He wanders among the trees, his eyes roving. He stops on seeing clouds of mist rising from the ground a little away. As the boy watches intently, shapes emerge from the mist. It is a fox's wedding. A procession led by the groom and the bride with others in tow is on its way. The boy watches, hidden from behind a tree. There is music in the background. The procession moves on with gentle, trotting steps. The procession reaches the tree behind which the boy is hiding. They suddenly stop, turn and look in the boy's direction. Frightened, the boy runs away.

1.Why does the light appear to fall in beams?

2.Why does the boy watch the procession from behind a tree?

3.What are the 'shapes' that appear before the boy?

4.Pick out from the passage a word that means, 'uppermost branches of trees forming a layer of leaves'.

5.Why is the boy frightened?

6. Identify any two visual images that give a dream-like quality to the scene.

ANSWERS

1.The forest is visible through a thin mist. Hence the light fall in beams through the gaps in the canopies of the trees.

2.The foxes doesn't like anyone watching their wedding procession. So the boy want to watch the procession without being noticed by the foxes.

3.The foxes wedding march. A procession led by the groom and the bride with others.

4.Canopies

5.The foxes found him watching the procession hiding

behind the tree.

6. The clouds of mist rising from the ground a little away. Shapes emerge from the mist.

Read the following passage from 'Sunshine through the Rain' and answer the questions that follow.

The boy's house. As he walks up to the house, he finds Mother standing under the eaves of the gatehouse.

Mother : You watched something you shouldn't have. I can't let you in. An angry fox came looking for you. He left this for you. (Mother hands the boy a baton. The boy turns it in his hands and finds it is a sheath that encloses a dagger. The boy draws out the dagger and then puts it back into the sheath.)

Mother : You are supposed to kill yourself. Go quickly and ask their forgiveness. Give the knife back and tell them how sorry you are.

(Mother turns, walks to the front door, half closes the door and turns.) Mother : They don't usually forgive. You must be ready to die. Get going. Unless

they forgive you, I can't let you in. Boy : But I don't know where they live.

Mother : You'll find out. On a day like this, there are always rainbows. Foxes live under rainbows.

(The Mother closes the door on the boy's face.)

1.What advice does the mother give the boy to save him from the foxes’ anger?

2.Do you think the mother is being cruel to the boy? Justify your answer.

3.'On a day like this, there are always rainbows.' What is the speciality of the day referred to here?

4.Pick out any two sentences from the above passage that are commands or directions.

ANSWERS

1.The mother advises the boy to go ask the forgiveness of the foxes to save his life.

2.No, the mother is not cruel. She allows her son to explore the world himself.

3.A day with sunshine and rain with a rainbow.

4.Get going.

Go quickly and ask for their forgiveness.

Read the following passage from 'The Beggar and the King' and answer the questions that

 

 

follow.

THE KING

: Send the beggar here.

THE SERVANT

:

O King!

THE KING

:

Ha! I rather fancy the fellow will stop his noise when the king

 

 

commands him to. Ha, ha, ha!

THE SERVANT

:

O King, thou wilt not have a beggar brought into thy royal chamber!

THE KING

:

(pleased with his idea) Yea. Go outside and tell this fellow that the

 

 

king desires his presence.

THE SERVANT

:

O great and illustrious king, thou wilt surely not do this thing. Thou

 

 

wilt surely not soil thy royal eyes by looking on such a filthy creature.

 

 

Thou wilt surely not contaminate thy lips by speaking to a common

 

 

beggar who cries aloud in the streets for bread.

THE KING

:

My ears have been soiled too much already. Therefore go now and

 

 

do as I have commanded thee.

THE SERVANT

: O great and illustrious king, thou wilt surely not--

THE KING

:

(roaring at him) I said, Go! (The Servant, abashed, goes out.)

 

 

Forsooth, I fancy the fellow will stop his bawling when I order him to.

 

 

Forsooth, I fancy he will be pretty well frightened when he hears that

 

 

the king desires his presence. Ha, ha, ha, ha!

1.What does the king fancy the beggar would do?

2.What suggestion by the servant pleases the king?

3.How, according to the servant, would the king's eyes and lips be affected if the beggar was brought into the palace?

4.What reason does the king finally give for bringing the beggar to the palace?

5.Look at the sentence: 'My ears have been soiled too much by the beggar.'

Now, begin the sentence with 'The beggar . . . . . .'

ANSWERS

1.The king fancies that beggar would stop his noise when he commands.

2.The servant suggests that he should not have a beggar brought into the royal chamber.

3.If the beggar is brought in, by looking at the beggar his eyes will be soiled and his lips will be contaminated by talking to him.

4.the king feels that the beggar will be frightened when he hears that the king desires his presence.

5.The beggar have soiled my ears too much.

Read the following passage from 'The Beggar and the King' and answer the questions that follow.

THE BEGGAR

: (Outside) Bread, Bread, Bread. Give me some bread.

THE KING

: (languidly) Who is that crying in the street for

 

bread?

THE SERVANT

: (fanning) O King, it's a beggar.

THE KING

: Why does he cry for bread?

THE SERVANT

: O King, he cries for bread in order that he may fill

 

his belly.

THE KING

: I do not like the sound of his voice. It annoys me very

 

much. Send him away

1.Where is the beggar standing?

2.Pick out from the above extract that means 'lazily'.

3.what was the servant doing?

4.What is your in pression about the king?

ANSWERS

1.Ouside the king's court.

2.lagiudly.

3.He was standing near the king and fanning.

4. The king behaves like a dictator. He doesn't care for the needs of his subject and forgets his duty.

Read the following passage from the story ‘The Bet’ and answer the questions that follow.

The old banker remembered all this and thought: ‘Tomorrow at twelve o’clock he will regain his freedom. By our agreement I ought to pay him two millions. If I do pay him, it is all over with me: I shall be utterly ruined.’ Fifteen years before, his millions had been beyond his reckoning; now he was afraid to ask himself which were greater, his debts or his assets. ‘Cursed bet!’ muttered the old man, clutching his head in despair, ‘Why didn’t the man die? He is only forty now. He will take my last penny from me, he will marry, will enjoy life, will gamble on the Exchange; while I shall look at him with envy like a beggar, and hear from him every day the same sentence: ‘I am indebted to you for the happiness of my life, let me help you!’ No, it is too much! The one means of being saved from bankruptcy and disgrace is the death of that man!’

1.‘I am indebted to you for the happiness of my life’. Who are the ‘I’ and the ‘you’ referred to in this sentence.

2.Greed for money leads men to cruelty. What cruel deed does the banker

think about?

3.‘Cursed bet!’ Why does the banker consider the bet a curse?

4.Pick out an expression that suggests the state of mind of the banker.

5.Find out a word from the passage that means ‘not having enough money to pay one’s debts’.

ANSWERS

1.'I' is the Lawyer and 'You' is the Banker

2.The Banker thinks about killing the

Lawyer.

3.The Banker consider the Bet a cursed one because he was going to lose his bet.

4.“Cursed bet muttered the old man, clutching his hair in despair.

5.Bankruptcy

Read the following passage from the story ‘The Bet’ and answer the questions that follow.

It was a dark autumn night. The old banker was walking up and down his study and remembering how, fifteen years before, he had given a party one autumn evening. There had been many clever men there and many interesting conversations. Among other things they had talked of capital punishment. The majority of the guests, among whom were many journalists and intellectual men, disapproved of death penalty. They considered that form of punishment out of date, immoral and unsuitable for Christian states. In the opinion of some of them, death penalty ought to be replaced everywhere by imprisonment for life.

1.What was the weather like?

2.What was the major issue discussed by the banker and his friends?

3.Why did some of them disapprove death penalty?

4.The word 'immoral is derived from the word 'moral' by adding the prefix 'im' to it. Pick out two such words that are formed by adding prefixes other than 'im' from the passage.

ANSWERS

1.It was a dark Autumn night.

2.The major issue discussed was 'capital punishment'.

3.They considered death penalty out of date,

immoral and unsuitable for Christian states. 4. Unsuitable, disapproved

Read the following passage from the story ‘The Bet’ and answer the questions that follow.

At the table a man unlike ordinary people was sitting motionless. He was a skeleton with the skin drawn tight over his bones, with long curls like a woman’s and a shaggy beard. His face was yellow with an earthy tint in it, his cheeks were hollow, his back long and narrow and the hand on which his shaggy head was propped was so thin and delicate that it was dreadful to look at it. His hair was already streaked with silver and seeing his emaciated, aged- looking face, no one would have believed that he was only forty. He was asleep.... In front of his bowed head there lay on the table a sheet of paper on which there was something written in fine handwriting.

‘Poor creature!’ thought the banker, ‘he is asleep and most likely dreaming of the millions. And I have only to take this half-dead man, throw him on the bed, stifle him a little with the pillow, and the most conscientious expert would find no sign of a violent death. But let us first read what he has written here...’

1.Why was the man described as ‘unlike ordinary people’?

2.What impressions do you get while looking at the man?

3.Who could be the ‘most conscientious expert’ that the banker had in his mind?

4.Why did the banker think that taking the man’s life was quite simple?

5.Look at the following sentence from the passage.

‘At the table a man unlike ordinary people was sitting motionless.’ Here ‘at the table’ is used before the subject ‘a man’. Pick out one such sentence from the passage.

ANSWERS

1.When the Banker entered the room, he saw a strange looking man, a skeleton with the skin drawn tight over his bones, shaggy beard. It was dreadful to look at it.

2.He was unlike ordinary people and dreadful to look at.

3.To take this half-dead man, throw him on the bed, stifle him a little with the pillow.

4.Because of fifteen years of confinement, the man had become half dead.

5.In front of his bowed head there lay on the table a sheet of paper.

Read the following passage from the story, ‘Balthazar’s Marvellous

Afternoon’ and answer the questions that follow:

The cage was finished. Balthazar hung it under the eaves, from force of habit, and when he finished lunch everyone was already saying that it was the most beautiful cage in the world. So many people came to see it that a crowd formed in front of the house and Balthazar had to take it down and close the shop. ‘You have to shave,’ Ursula, his wife, told him. ‘You look like a capuchin.’

‘It’s bad to shave in the afternoon.’

He had two weeks growth, short, hard, and bristly hair like the mane of a mule and the general expression of a frightened boy. He did not know that for some people the cage he had just made was the most beautiful one in the world. For him, accustomed to making cages since childhood, it had been hardly any more difficult than the others.

‘Rest for a while then,’ Ursula said to him.

1.Why did Ursula describe Balthazar as a capuchin?

2.Why did Balthazar hang the cage under the eaves?

3.Why didn’t Balthazar have the same feelings of others about the beauty of the cage?

4.What reason did Balthazar say for not accepting Ursula’s suggestion to shave?

5.Look at the sentence: Maya is used to getting up early. Substitute the underlined phrase with a suitable word/phrase from the passage.

6.Read the following sentence.

The cage was finished.

Begin the sentence with – Balthazar ....

1.Because Balthazar was not shaved.

2.It was his habit to hung the cages he made.

3.Because he was accustomed to making cages since childhood.

4.He felt it was bad to shave in the afternoon.

5.accustomed to 'Maya is accustomed to getting up early'.

6.Balthazar finished the cage.

Read the following passage from the speech, ‘Art that Heals’ and answer the questions

that follow:

One of my parents’ deepest fears, I suspect, was that society would not properly value me as a musician, that I wouldn’t be appreciated. I had very good grades in high school, I was good in science and math, and they imagined that as a doctor or a research chemist or an engineer, I might be more appreciated than I would be as a musician. On some level, I think, my parents were not sure themselves what the value of music was, what its purpose was. And they loved music, they listened to classical music all the time. They just weren’t really clear about its function. We live in a society that puts music in the ‘arts and entertainment’ section of the newspaper. Serious music, the kind your kids are about to engage in, has absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with entertainment. In fact it’s the opposite of entertainment. Let me talk a little bit about music, and how it works.

1.Who is the ‘I’ referred to in the passage above?

2.What was the fear that his parents had?

3.Pick out a sentence from the passage that suggests that Karl was very studious.

4.Did Karl’s parents love music? Find out the expression from the passage that supports your view.

5.Find the word from the passage that means ‘to recognize the good qualities of somebody’.

6.What is the attitude of the society towards music?

ANSWERS

1.'I' is the author, Karl Paulnack

2.His parents feared that he would take up music as profession than a doctor, engineer or a research chemist.

3.'I had good grades at school, I was good in science and math'.

4.Yes. 'And they loved music, listened to classical music all the time.

5.to recognize the good qualities of somebody – appreciated

6.Society puts music in the 'arts and entertainment' section of the newspaper. It means society give little value for music.