Share PDF

Search documents:
  Report this document  
    Download as PDF   
      Share on Facebook

THE

RULES

1

2

Introduction to

IASCA

Foreword/Acknowledgements

4

 

 

What is IASCA? (A brief history)

5

 

 

IASCA Mission Statement

6

 

 

Letter from the President

7

 

 

Letter from the Director

8

 

 

The Drive to Compete

9

 

 

IASCA Competition Formats

10

 

 

Competitor Handbook

13

 

 

SQC (Sound Quality Challenge

25

 

 

iQC (Installation Quality Challenge)

49

 

 

RTA/SPL Challenge

69

 

 

Multimedia

73

 

 

Tuner Jam

85

 

 

MACS

101

 

 

Niteglow

105

 

 

Tips from the Pros

110

 

 

3

FOREWORD

IASCA Rules and Competition

An education in system building and tuning

The IASCA rules are designed and written to offer all levels of car audio enthusiasts the opportunity to learn more about car audio system building and tuning.

In the following pages and sections of this rule book, you‘ll find helpful tips and hints on tuning your vehicle‘s sound system for optimum sound quality, installation techniques and how to get that extra dB or two from your vehicle, as well as which elements will help you score more points at car shows, lighting competitions or building a sound system that your friends will envy!

These rules are the same ones used to train our judges; they‘re an important facet of our growth. As technology changes, our goal is to move forward with it; this is why we have annual revisions. And, when we revise the rules, we do all we can to get this information out to you as quickly as possible.

So when you‘re reading this book, don‘t look at the rules contained in it just as ―how the game is played‖; see them as a tool you can use to better your knowledge and understanding of sound, tuning, installation and SPL.

Remember, when you learn, you grow… we want you to learn and grow with us.

Have a great competition season and we‘ll see you in the lanes!

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Over the years, there have been many people who have given of themselves to create this rule book; the following list contains some of those names. IASCA Worldwide Inc. would like to thank everyone who has contributed, for their support and efforts:

Van Adkinson, Wayne Allan, Gary Biggs, Rad Bolt, Jeff Boudreau, Natan Budiono, Scott Buwalda, Mike Dailey,

Greg Davis, Mark Eldridge, Jamie Edmundson, Stefano Eupani, Manuel Fandino, James Feltenberger, Andrew Fleming,

Terry Floyd, Jason Gay, Michael Hadden, Mike Jaffe, Harry Kimura, Bill Kraut, Chris Lewis, Fred Lynch, Chris McVay, Darren Millard, Terry Miller, Chris Orblom, Paul Papadeas, Somkiat Pookyaporn, Shazad Rahaman, Patrick Riquelme, John Robinson, Moe Sabourin,

Gord Stansell, Vicki Straam, Eduardo Tascon, Ron Trout, Keith Turner, Sammy Vega, Ben Vollmer, Tom Walker, Mic Wallace, Douglas Winker

4

WHAT IS

?

A brief history

IASCA is an acronym for the

“International Auto Sound Challenge Association”

Originally founded as NACA in 1987 and named IASCA in 1989, IASCA‘s mission in those years was to create a marketing program to proliferate the sale of mobile electronics in North America and help the industry grow.

Conceived by executives from numerous different manufacturers in the electronics industry, the main marketing tool that was created by IASCA was the ―Soundoff‖, or car audio competition.

Soundoffs were the perfect vehicle to show off manufacturers‘ products in a fun, competitive environment and the program met with great success in its early years.

A set of rules for competition was created and the format quickly became the benchmark for car audio systems and installations around the world. Many different programs were spawn from the Soundoff, like Autosound Clinics, Championship events and dealer sales programs.

Most notably, the IASCA World Finals brought a sense of global standards to the industry and manufacturers began using the organization to create standards for their product; thus creating

―The Standard By Which Great Mobile Electronics Performance is Measured”

However, over the years, the Soundoff became the all consuming format that IASCA was known for and many of the other programs were put aside in favor of the machine that was the Soundoff.

Although an integral part of IASCA‘s mission to proliferate the industry, it is still only a part of what IASCA is all about. In 2001, the organization was purchased by one of its Board of Directors, Mr. Paul Papadeas.

His mission is to bring the values that IASCA had created back then, back to the industry, so that standards for mobile electronics and competition were once again the benchmark for the industry and for car audio competition.

To date, Mr. Papadeas has succeeded in his mission and the organization continues to grow and build those standards worldwide; as we move towards the future,

IASCA‘s mission is to continue to raise the bar for the benefit of its competitor, dealer and manufacturer members in over 34 countries around the world.

5

Mission Statement

Our mission is to promote the Mobile Electronics

Industry and to enhance the Retailer‘s ability to consistently reach greater segments of the consumer marketplace. Our goal is to be the most effective, value added sales and marketing organization in the industry. We will nurture, build and strengthen Retailers in their local marketplace by means of IASCA‘s consumer Autosound Clinic formats, subsequent IASCA Soundoff competitions and culminating in strategically positioned IASCA Territorial Key Event Expos.

Our Commitment to the entire IASCA membership is that we will remain true and equitable, contributing to the growth of our industry while remaining

The Standard by Which Great Mobile

Electronics Performance is Measured.

6

A letter from the President

Greetings, Car Audio Fans!

It is with great pride we offer the most refined set of rules for evaluating great Mobile Audio performance that our industry has ever seen. IASCA rules for Soundoff competition were the original guidelines for judging systems and were developed and refined through an extensive collaboration of industry leaders.

Since its inception in 1987, the International Auto Sound Challenge Association has had a huge impact on the Mobile Electronics Industry worldwide. IASCA‘s Soundoff competitions have led our industry‘s manufacturers to design and produce better performing and more durable mobile electronics equipment; and in doing so, the clear winners in this venture are you, our valued consumers and competitors.

Years of diligent effort have gone into the following pages. The established criteria within not only provides for fair and unbiased Soundoff competitions, but also defines the guidelines for anyone who has the interest in achieving dynamically accurate sound reproduction in their vehicles. We hope that these pages will give you a better understanding of autosound design so you may develop your own sound system and join us in the fun of autosound competition.

Look for an IASCA Retailer in your area to get the kind of input you‘ll need to get your system crankin‘! Even if you never wind up in the IASCA judging lanes, we hope you‘ll find out how much fun it is when you experience the entertainment value that YOUR great car audio system can deliver. It‘s something you just never get tired of. Best of luck to you all; let the tweaking begin!

Paul Papadeas, President

IASCA Worldwide Inc.

7

A letter from the Director

Hello and welcome to IASCA!

Over the years, there have been many great advances in the mobile electronics industry. Every change has made us all wiser and we‘ve moved forward. As new and innovative approaches are introduced, every aspect of our industry changes to meet these new challenges… As a good friend of mine said to me once...

“Change is inevitable… Growth… is optional.”

Since IASCA‘s inception, its rules have evolved to meet these challenges.

They have been designed to meet the needs of the competitor while still maintaining the benchmark for them to achieve. The updates, revisions and changes from past versions, that are contained in this rule book, are for your benefit. They are written to help you raise the bar when it comes to sound system performance in your vehicle and, to expand your knowledge in the world of mobile electronics.

The rules have been designed and updated with the help of some of the most important people in our industry; your peers. Long standing IASCA competitor members, dealer members, affiliate members and veteran IASCA judges have been selected to assist in this ongoing project. The rules are written by members, for members; we hope that you find them to be a powerful reference to draw from when building and tuning the sound system in your vehicle.

Once all is said and done and you‘re in the lanes ready to compete, the rules are but a part of the total Soundoff experience. There are so many exciting facets to the world of Soundoff competition and we hope that you enjoy every one of them. But, through every facet, you must always remember the most important rule in this book; Rule #1 - you have to have fun doing it!

So get out there, have fun and we wish you all the best in your competition season!

Moe Sabourin, Director, Worldwide Operations,

IASCA Worldwide Inc.

“Competition is a by-product of productive work, not its goal. A creative man is motivated by the desire to achieve, not by the desire to beat others.”

- Ayn Rand (1905 – 1982)

8

THE DRIVE TO COMPETE

Competition of any kind requires a substantial commitment by the participant, especially in time and in effort. Therefore, it‘s no surprise that with this commitment comes an equally strong desire to experience the thrill of victory. The IASCA competition formats are not only designed to offer a fair and unbiased competition experience with its rules, classification and judging; we provide participants with the benefits of receiving feedback and advice based on the knowledge of our IASCA Certified Judges.

Participating in an officially sanctioned IASCA competition ensures the credibility of the judging process and enables you to meet others who share your passion. By networking with fellow competitors and witnessing other systems in competition, those who desire the best performance from their vehicle can learn of ways to improve it when exposed to this process. In all, it‘s great

fun and a wonderful learning experience. Through the years, many competitors have actually parleyed their competition experience into a career within the industry.

The path to winning can and most likely will be long and hard. It is inevitable that along the way you will at some time experience a loss; however, it can be easily accepted if you consider that what you will have won are new ideas to improve your system from the comments and evaluation on the IASCA score sheet.

After the competition we recommend taking that score sheet to the nearest IASCA retailer for a consultation on how to improve each score. An IASCA retailer will be able to offer advice, products and installation techniques which can help you achieve your goal of reproducing the most accurate sound in your vehicle.

This rule book represents the criteria for evaluating your system, which has become the industry standard. Its content can help you to improve the sound performance of your vehicle whether you choose to compete or not.

9

IASCA COMPETITON FORMATS

SQC (Sound Quality Challenge)

The intent of IASCA‘s SQC, or Sound Quality Challenge, format and its rules is to provide a fair, fun and unbiased sound judging format , evaluating automotive sound systems in five critical areas of sound reproduction; Tonal Accuracy, Sound Stage, Imaging, Linearity and Absence of Noise. The main premise of evaluation is to Judge the system as it would be used in a real world application (the user driving down the road listening to the music). Certain classes are designed for vehicles that are not intended for road use, but that is the main premise.

There are seven Classes in SQC; Rookie, Amateur, Pro/Am, Pro One, Ultimate, Expert and Expert Solo. The first four Classes (Rookie, Amateur,

Pro/Am, Pro One) are evaluated in what has become termed as ―single seat‖ or ―one seat‖ judging. The Ultimate and Expert Classes are evaluated in the ―two seat‖ judging format, while Expert Solo (a Class designed for single seat vehicles) is evaluated by two judges from the same seating position.

IQC (Installation Quality Challenge)

The intent of IASCA‘s Installation Quality Challenge format and its rules is to provide a fair, fun and unbiased judging format, evaluating the installation of automotive sound systems and related components in four main criteria; Safety, Integrity, Integration and Craftsmanship.

In IQC, competitors are also evaluated on their knowledge of the system and its construction through Presentation and Creative Elements scoring.

RTA/SPL Challenge

The IASCA RTA/SPL Challenge is a competition to show how well a sound system performs across all frequency ranges through the sound spectrum, as well as at higher output levels . RTA/SPL is an interactive format; in the RTA portion of evaluation, the competitor is the person operating the meter while the judge supervises. The SPL section of the challenge is done with music only; no test tones, sweeps or bass bombs, the measurement is taken using full range sound. Additionally in the SPL portion of the competition, the competitor chooses which music they‘d like to play.

Scores from the SPL level and the RTA curve of the system are then combined for an overall system performance score, determining the winner.

10

IASCA TRIPLE CROWN

The IASCA Triple Crown is not so much a format, but rather a determination of who has the overall best sounding, best built and best performing system of the event. It is an award for the competitors at an event who enter all three of the sound related formats (SQC, IQC, RTA/ SPL Challenge). It is truly a test of who is the best system tuner and builder.

The IASCA Triple Crown winner at an event will be determined by adding all three scores together and determining the percentage of the overall score. The competitor with the highest overall score percentage at an event will be declared the winner.

SPECIAL NOTE ON SOUND FORMATS

IASCA Affiliates and Event Directors have the option to offer each sound format (SQC, IQC and RTA/SPL) individually or together under one set of Classes, based on the market in their country or area. They also have the option to offer two formats combined, under one set of Classes, if they so choose.

If a competitor wishes to compete in only one format at an event (SQC,

IQC or RTA/SPL), check with the event organizer to make certain they‘re offering that format individually.

IdBL (IASCA dB League)

This is IASCA ‘s SPL competition format. IdBL Divisions (Rookie, Stock, Stock Pro, Advanced and Ultimate) are based on the experience and industry position of the competitor and the level of modification to the vehicle. IdBL Classes are based on the cumulative total of all subwoofer cone surfaces in square inches (see cone area calculation chart).

Sound Pressure Level (SPL) measurements in decibels are registered using the IASCA AC-3056 RTA/SPL meter . Determining the winner is simple; the highest score in each class wins! Any metering system may be used at SPE or DPE events, however at TKE‘s and WRE events, the

Official IASCA AC-3056 meter must be used.

Typically, most show promoters will offer two scoring attempts, giving each competitor the opportunity to increase their previous score. The highest score of the two attempts will prevail.

11

BASS BOXING

IASCA Bass Boxing is a format designed to bring

musicality and showmanship back to SPL competition. In Bass Boxing, competitors face off against each other in an elimination format; after first round qualifying, the top two competitors move on to the subsequent rounds.

Competitors ―duke it out‖ for up to four (4) rounds in Bass Boxing; the first

(or Qualifying) round determines the two Finalists, then the finalists compete against each other in a three Round final match.

In all Rounds, competitors play musical tracks of their choice (from a commercially available CD - must be approved by the event Judges); the track is played for 30 seconds; the highest average decibel level (SPL) achieved during the time period is recorded. (continued next page)

In the three Round final match, the competitors‘ individual scores are added together and divided by three for their average SPL score; the competitor with the highest average SPL score for the three rounds is declared the winner.

TUNER JAM

Tuner Jam is IASCA‘s ―Show & Shine‖ competition car show format. Tuner

Jam utilizes IASCA Judging classifications and rules that are designed to eliminate grey areas between that which is considered ―Mild‖ and ―Wild.‖

Scoring is based on the quality of the modifications and the work that is performed, not just ―how it looks‖.

MACS (Mobile Audio Car Show)

MACS is a competition format designed for those who want to show off their vehicles and sound systems, without getting into the detailed judging of IASCA SQC or IQC, or the showmanship of Bass Boxing.

Competitors at a MACS event need only show up at the venue, park their vehicle, open it up and play music, or videos or both! They don‘t even have to be at their vehicle to be judged!

NITEGLOW

The IASCA Niteglow competition evaluates the

competitor‘s vehicle accent lighting in both interior and exterior schemes; the use of any light source to enhance esthetic appeal or highlight a system feature and overall the safety and integrity of the installation are considered while judging.

12

Competitor

Handbook

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ï‚·PREFACE

ï‚·POINTS ACCRUAL

ï‚·EVENT TYPES

ï‚·QUALIFYING FOR IASCA SEASON FINALE

ï‚·CHANGING DIVISIONS OR CLASSES

ï‚·SPONSORSHIP

ï‚·COMPETITOR GUIDELINES

ï‚·GENERAL EVENT RULES AND PROCEDURES

ï‚·EVENT HOST GUIDELINES

ï‚·PROTESTS

ï‚·SOURCE UNITS AND SOFTWARE IN IASCA COMPETITITON

13

PREFACE

Welcome to the IASCA Competitor‘s Handbook; we‘ve designed this section to give you information not generally found in the rules. It should also serve as a reference for clarification and interpretation and used as a guide in conjunction with the rules as you prepare for competition.

This Handbook details how to earn points and qualify to compete at a National level, what types of events are available, proper conduct and the general rules at any IASCA sanctioned event.

Competition represents a significant commitment, both in time and money; IASCA appreciates your support and commitment to what we all love. If you, as a competi- tor, have any suggestions for this Handbook, we welcome them; please submit them to memberservices@iasca.com

POINTS ACCRUAL

One of the benefits of being an IASCA Competitor Member is the ability to earn IASCA Competition Award Points (CAP points) at IASCA sanctioned events. CAP points are earned by competing at these events and the higher a Competitor Member places in the standings for their class at an event, the more points they earn. The points are cumulative through a competition season, so the more events you compete at, the more points you ―rack up‖!

You‘re probably asking; ―Why do I want or need to earn points? What do they do for me?‖

Well, here‘s the answer; at the end of every competition season, each IASCA affiliate country hosts their annual season finale. In order to qualify for an invitation, Competitor Members are required to accrue points over the course of the competition season. Once the minimum amount of points are accrued, the

Competitor Member will automatically receive their invitation. We‘ll elaborate on that in the ―Qualifying for IASCA season finale‖ section. But first, here are the details on the CAP points breakdown.

CAP points per event in all IASCA Competition Formats are as follows:

ï‚·1st Place = 10 points

ï‚·2nd Place = 9 points

ï‚·3rd Place = 8 points

ï‚·4th Place = 7 points

ï‚·5th Place = 6 points

ï‚·6th Place = 5 points

ï‚·7th Place = 4 points

ï‚·8th Place = 3 points

ï‚·9th Place = 2 points

ï‚·10th Place or lower = 1 point

And remember, make sure you get a copy of your score sheet and save it for future reference!! Sometimes situations occur and records do not get transferred properly; your only record of attendance, competing, score and placement at an event is the score sheet, so keep your copy just in case. If for some reason your CAP points are not added to your total, your copy of the score sheet is your proof that you did earn those points. If this situation happens, you can send us a copy and we will correct the situation.

14

EVENT TYPES

There are four distinct types (levels) of IASCA sanctioned events; SPE, DPE, TKE and WRE. Each is designed to cater to the size of the event, making it affordable and enticing for dealers and show promoters to host. SPE, DPE and TKE events allow Competitor Members to accrue CAP points at escalating levels.

SPE - Single Point Events are typically produced at local car audio dealer locations and are designed to promote the shops to the general public. Dealers and show promoters can offer any, or a combination of any, of the IASCA Competition Formats they choose to at an SPE event. Event promoters may use any metering system they choose. SPE = CAP points value x 1

DPE - Double Point Events are produced by dealers and promoters to draw more competitors who are interested in accumulating points to qualify for the season‘s finale. The minimum required competition formats that dealers or show promoters can offer at a DPE event are SQ and IdBL. Event promoters may use any metering system they choose. DPE = CAP points value x 2

TKE - Territorial Key Events are triple point events; typically larger than DPE and SPE and involve manufacturer displays, a Tuner Jam car show, Niteglow competition, Bass Boxing and other attractions. SQC and IdBL are the minimum required competition formats. Event Promoters at TKE events must use the Official IASCA meter; as the points values at these events are worth more and the caliber of judging is highest, it is necessary to use the Official meter.

TKE = CAP points value x 3

WRE - IdBL World Record Events—WRE events are available at DPE and TKE events only. WRE events require the presence of an IASCA Certified IdBL World Record Judge and sanctioning must be approved by the IASCA Head Office. WRE events do not offer any additional CAP points to a member, however competing at a WRE event earns the member the chance to qualify on the IdBL International Top 10 List and the opportunity to set an Official IdBL World Record for their Class. All IASCA IdBL WRE events require the use of the Official IASCA meter.

Competition Formats

15

QUALIFYING FOR THE IASCA SEASON FINALE

To qualify for an invitation to compete at any IASCA season finale, Competitor Members must meet the following criteria:

ï‚·Competitor Members must accrue the minimum required amount of CAP points set for the season (see below), based on a percentage scale relative to the number of IASCA sanctioned events scheduled in their region for the competition season.

Competitor Members‘ membership must be current and in good standing until the final day of the competition season, no later than 45 days prior to the date set for the season‘s Finals.

ï‚·Competitor Members must attend and compete at no less than 50% of the SPE events scheduled within a 250 mile radius of their home town.

Competitor Members do not have to attend a DPE or TKE event in order to qualify. As the SPE event is designed to help promote the independent retail dealer, the focus on events is towards these shows. In the past, Competitor Members could simply compete at a DPE or TKE event and automatically qualify for an invitation to the Finals; this is no longer the case. DPE and TKE events are not automatic qualifiers for a Finals invite; they are simply larger scale events that give Competitor Members the opportunity to accrue CAP points quicker.

The minimum required amount of CAP points that a Competitor Member must earn, in order to qualify for an automatic invitation to the IASCA season finale, is 50 points. There are some exceptions to this minimum qualification and the following paragraphs detail those exceptions.

We understand that not every area in the country is going to be filled with IASCA sanctioned events through the course of any given season. So, we have designed a system to allow those with fewer shows in their areas to still have the opportunity to qualify for an IASCA season finale invitation. The system works as such; Competitor Members must accrue a minimum of 70% of the available CAP points within that area. Example: If there are 5 shows within a 250 mile radius of a Competitor

Member‘s home town, there is a potential of 50 CAP points available for that competitor to earn; 70% of those 50 potential CAP points is 35 CAP points, therefore that competitor would have to accrue a minimum of 35 CAP points to qualify for an invitation to Finals.

SPECIAL EXEMPTIONS

Those who work in and for the military, police, fire and/or ambulance (EMT) services are exempt from the minimum qualifying points and receive an automatic invitation; as these individuals give of themselves to protect our freedom, cities and health, their outstanding contribution to society earns them the right to compete at Finals without having to meet the minimum requirements.

The previous year‘s IASCA season finale Champions are also exempt; for their performance in the previous season and their achievement at the previous Finals event, they automatically receive an invitation to the following year‘s World Finals.

The top 2 Competitor Member CAP Points leaders in each class by region, regardless of how many points they have accrued, will also receive an invitation to the season finale, provided they have met all the other criteria set forth for qualifying.

16

IASCA reserves the right to grant a season finale invitation to any Competitor Member in good standing, for any given reason, whether they have met the minimum requirements or not.

Certain individuals, like IASCA Certified Judges, dealers and promoters and IASCA Affiliate Country Members, who support IASCA through their services to our organization, earn the right to a Finals invitation to compete, based on their support of our organization. However, IASCA‘s right to grant invitations is solely at the discretion of the staff of IASCA Worldwide Inc.

Each IASCA Competition Format has its own unique Divisions and Classes. To decide which to compete in, refer to each Competition Format‘s section in this rule book. If you own more than one vehicle, you are allowed to compete in more than one Competition format, Division or Class, however, you must carry a membership for each vehicle. With one membership, you can compete in as many different formats as you want with one vehicle, but you can only compete in one Division and Class within that format.

If a Competitor competes in more than one IASCA format, they must accrue the sufficient amount of CAP points for each format in order to qualify for an invitation. CAP points earned in two different formats may not be combined.

CHANGING DIVISIONS OR CLASSES

When first signing up as a Competitor Member with IASCA, it‘s sometimes difficult to know which Division or Class you should be competing in; that‘s why we offer all new Competitor Members the option to change their Division or Class within 30 days of signing up as a new member. After 30 days, requests for changes have to be submitted (in writing or electronically) to the IASCA head office for approval. Members may request the assistance of any IASCA Official or the IASCA Head Office to help them determine their proper classification.

IASCA Competition Formats‘ Divisions and Classes are designed around two main criteria; Members who are either affiliated with the Mobile Electronics Industry (generally known as ―Pros‖) or not (generally known as Rookies or Amateurs), as well as the type and level of modification/s to their vehicles.

Competitor Members who are affiliated with the Mobile Electronics industry in varying degrees have specific Divisions and Classes in which to compete in (typically known as Pro or Expert Classes) and cannot move down into any of the Rookie or Amateur Classes, especially within a given competition season. As each Competition Format varies, based on the type of competition, the details of changing Divisions and Classes are more accurately detailed in the rules for each Competition Format.

The general rule of thumb however is this; you can go up in Division or Class, but in certain Competition Formats, you can‘t go down.

17

SPONSORSHIP

One of the questions that gets asked the most when trying to figure out what Division or Class to compete in is; ―What is considered as sponsorship?‖ For the purpose of clarification and proper competition Classification, the term ―sponsorship‖ by IASCA‘s definition is:

Receiving without cost, any finances, equipment, labor or vehicle from any person or entity that sells, installs, distributes and/or manufactures autosound products at any level, wholesale or retail for any reason and/or in exchange for publicity, advertisement or promotion of and for a brand or affiliated brand. This includes extraordinary discounts not commonly available to the general public, receiving funds or being reimbursed for typical corporate expenses to attend competitions including; travel, meals, fuel, accommodations, mileage and/or per diem.

In short, this means any discounts below normal discounts you‘d get at a store, or ―freebie‖ equipment from anyone in the industry that directly relates to your sound system.

The following criteria is not considered as receiving ―sponsorship‖:

ï‚·Receiving reasonable retail discounts such as commonly advertised (e.g. 25% or 50% Off Sales)

Special retail deals such as ―Buy 3, get one free‖ or as an example ―Buy an amplifier and get a free wire kit‖

ï‚·Being a member of a manufacturer supported team.

ï‚·Receiving compensation or reimbursements for competition entry fees to attend a competition as part of a manufacturer supported team.

ï‚·Receiving hotel accommodations as a member of a manufacturer supported team while competing at an event.

ï‚·Receiving branded apparel at little or no cost as a member of a manufacturer supported team.

ï‚·Receiving assistance with the tuning or set up of an audio system by a professional; whether paid or voluntary, at any time prior to a competition or while preparing a vehicle the day of the competition.

18

COMPETITOR GUIDELINES

The following details some of the general guidelines and responsibilities that competitors should adhere to when attending an IASCA sanctioned event.

ï‚·PUNCTUALITY - Be on time to a competition. Event promoters set schedules for judging times, competitor meetings and activities throughout the day. When a competitor arrives late, it upsets this schedule and event timing is compromised. If a competitor is unable to make it to the event at the specified time, they should call the event promoter and notify them of their situation as not to delay the event.

ï‚·ATTEND THE COMPETITORS MEETING - The competitors meeting at an

IASCA sanctioned event is held to inform the logistics for the timely completion of the days activities.

ï‚·PREPARE YOUR VEHICLE FOR THE SHOW IN ADVANCE. Tuning, cleaning, working on and/or testing your vehicle should be done prior to the event.

BE A SHOW OFF! - This is a car show, so, show off your car! Locking it up and/or covering it to keep it ―top secret‖ doesn‘t help our industry grow. The whole idea behind these events is to show the public what we can do; if you hide it, they‘ll never know.

ï‚·LEARN THE IASCA SOFTWARE - Familiarize yourself with the IASCA CD that you need for your format of competition. Knowing this CD will not only help you to be prepared when entering the competition lanes, but these discs are valuable tools for assessing and tuning the sound system in your vehicle. ASK

QUESTIONS! - Never be afraid to ask questions; even by competing, you are asking an IASCA Certified Judge to evaluate your vehicle and they are trained professionals who will give your vehicle a thorough evaluation. Don‘t be afraid to ask them to share their thoughts with you; IASCA judges are always happy to assist competitors to improve their systems. Use their knowledge to help you improve and soon your system will be performing to its maximum potential.

LISTEN! - Don‘t be afraid to ask fellow competitors if you can listen to their vehicles; listening to a vehicle that you know scores well in competition will give you another reference point to work from and will be very helpful in the setting

up and tuning of your own vehicle. Most competitors are more than happy to show off their vehicles, as they are the product of their passion. Just remember to treat your fellow competitor‘s vehicle as if it was your own; they are just as proud of their ride as you are of yours!

MAKE FRIENDS AT IASCA EVENTS - IASCA events are great places to meet people who share the same passion that you have; a true love for car audio and competition. Don‘t be afraid to walk around and check out other competitors‘ vehicles; you‘ll find that most competitors are proud of their rides and love to talk about them.

JUDGES ARE PEOPLE TOO - IASCA Certified Judges are not just there to evaluate your car and score it; they‘re there to help you improve your sound system. During a competition, they can‘t say much to you, but when the show is over, don‘t be afraid to ask them for their input regarding your sound system. While judging, they are under a great deal of pressure to ―get the job done‖ within the time frame set up by the dealer/promoter; asking them questions about your vehicle or system while they are judging is not good practice.

19

ï‚·PROPER CONDUCT - When attending/competing at an event, conducting yourself in a proper and professional manner is imperative. Using foul or abusive language (especially in front of children), consuming alcoholic beverages, possession or use of controlled substances, lewd behavior and/or displaying or playing obscene videos, pictures or music is unacceptable and could lead to reprimands and/or disqualification from the event. IASCA events are designed to be family oriented; when you are competing at an IASCA event, you are representing the organization to the public.

ï‚·FIREARMS AT EVENTS - Firearms of any sort at an IASCA sanctioned event are strictly forbidden; the only people allowed to carry firearms at an event are police and military personnel. Anyone caught carrying firearms at an event (other than police and military personnel) will be immediately disqualified and removed from the event venue.

SPREAD THE WORD! - IASCA is always looking for forward thinking, innovative and ambitious dealers and show promoters to host IASCA sanctioned events. By signing up new dealers and/or promoters, we expand our member base and attract new shows and members. Don‘t be afraid to talk to your local retailer about IASCA; a new IASCA Retail Member means a new show in your area for you to compete at and new members to compete against!

REMEMBER, COMPETITION INVOLVES YOUR VEHICLE AND YOU! BE THE

BEST YOU CAN BE!

GENERAL EVENT RULES AND PROCEDURES

As a general rule of thumb, if a rule is in this book is taken out of context from its intent as deemed by the judge at an event, or if an item is questioned and is not written or addressed specifically in this rule book, it will be deemed ―illegal‖ in competition until otherwise specified by the IASCA Rules and Ethics Committee.

ï‚·General IASCA Policies & Procedures govern all IASCA sanctioned events and are enforced by judging officials. Any inquiries regarding rules or policy & procedure amendments can be directed to memberservices@iasca.com.

ï‚·Competitors must completely fill out and sign the Official IASCA score sheet with all the information fields requested. Unsigned and/or incomplete forms will be deemed invalid and could result in the loss of placement, CAP points and global standings.

ï‚·Competitors may only enter one Division/Class per vehicle in each format.

ï‚·The Head Judge can disqualify, without recourse, any competitor who is caught cheating. Repeat offenses of cheating will cause the loss of any or all accumulated CAP points earned at IASCA sanctioned events and disqualification from participation in all future IASCA sanctioned events.

Competitors are not allowed to look at their, or anyone else‘s, score sheet during the course of the competition. Competitors found reading any score sheet prior to the end of the event will receive at minimum a ten (10) point deduction from their total score. Continued infractions will result in the competitor being disqualified from the competition and/or having all or part of their CAP points rescinded.

ï‚·Any falsification or misrepresentation of entry registration information regarding participant, vehicle and/or audio system, Division, or Class will be cause for

20

immediate disqualification without recourse. Continued infractions, if deemed appropriate by IASCA, will result in a loss of all or part of the competitor‘s accrued CAP points for the season.

Regardless of any State or National law requirements, competitors must be able to produce, if requested by an IASCA official at an event, a valid vehicle registration or certificate of title, or an unaltered facsimile thereof, to verify vehicle ownership. A competitor‘s vehicle must be titled and/or registered in the competitor‘s name, proving they are the rightful owner.

ï‚·Vehicle criterion set forth in this rule book is in place for use in competition only. All Government legislation regarding the roadworthiness of vehicles still applies if vehicle is driven to and from events.

Competitor Members may appoint a ―co-pilot‖ to compete with their vehicle, so long as that person is listed as the ―co-pilot‖ for the vehicle on the Competitor Member‘s membership card. This person's name must appear on the membership card (example: "John and Jane Smith" or "Bob Jones and Jim Johnson"). In the event of a store membership, a maximum of three store employees/owners may be listed as authorized co-pilots whose names must appear on the membership card. A person affiliated with the mobile electronics industry (Pro, Expert) may not present a Rookie or Amateur vehicle, unless otherwise approved by an IASCA Official, Representative or Head Office.

ï‚·Competitors must have a valid photo ID available for inspection at the request of an IASCA Event Official.

ï‚·Competitor Members whose vehicle is entered into any IASCA Sound Quality competition format (SQC, IQC, RTA/SPL Challenge) will be judged once for that format. Exception: If for any reason there is an issue requiring the vehicles to be re-judged, the head judge will notify the competitors.

ï‚·Competitor Members whose vehicle is entered into IASCA IdBL competition will be judged a minimum of one time.

All audio equipment in a Competitor Member‘s vehicle must be powered by the vehicle‘s charging system and cannot be connected to any external power supplies.

The head judge reserves the right to have vehicles judged with the vehicle‘s motor running or not, if weather or other conditions may cause unreasonable fatigue or discomfort (i.e. heat or cold) for the judges. The Head Judge may instruct the judging staff to adjust heating/air conditioning controls in the vehicles to remedy the situation (Sound Quality competition formats only).

ï‚·Any questionable concerns (protests) during the course of an event must be directed only to the Head Judge and not the judge or event staff. The Head Judge is the only person authorized to address the any issues that may arise.

21

EVENT HOST GUIDELINES

ï‚·Event hosts are allowed to offer one, or as many of, the sanctioned competition formats that IASCA has to offer at SPE (Single Point Event) or DPE (Double Point Event) events.

ï‚·Event Hosts must offer at minimum an IASCA sanctioned all Sound Quality and IdBL competition formats at TKE (Territorial Key Event or Triple Point Event).

ï‚·Event Hosts are allowed to offer a WRE (World Record Event) IdBL event at any DPE or TKE. WRE events are not sanctioned at SPE events and are not official unless a certified IASCA WRE Official is present and an IASCA Official meter is used to register competitor scores.

ï‚·Dealers/Promoters are allowed to offer as many IASCA sanctioned events as they wish throughout the course of a competition season.

ï‚·Event hosts are required to provide a minimum of 1st through 3rd place awards for all classes that they charge an entry fee for.

ï‚·Event hosts are required to have at minimum one IASCA Certified judge per format they offer.

ï‚·Event hosts reserve the right to set specific registration and competition starting and cut off times and entry fees. Due to the unique nature of each event, some event hosts may be limited to a certain time frame to fit within local ordinances, therefore it is imperative that competitors arrive at an event within the specified registration and/or start times.

Event hosts are required to supply each competitor with a copy of their competition score sheet at the end of the event. If a competitor does not collect their score sheet at the end of the event, the event host is required to hold the competitor‘s copy for a period of 30 days from the event date.

ï‚·Event hosts are required to send the original copies of the score sheets and event results back to the IASCA Office within 7 days of the event for processing and data entry.

ï‚·Dealers/Promoters wishing to host an IASCA sanctioned event must submit an

IASCA Event Sanctioning Form to the IASCA office a minimum of 30 days prior to the event for approval.

PROTESTS

If a competitor feels that someone is taking advantage of a situation, or is not competing within the guidelines and intent set forth in this rulebook, they may file a formal protest to the Head Judge of the event or directly to IASCA Worldwide Inc.

Protests must be made in writing. On the day of event, it must be presented to the Head Judge. The protest must provide specific details as to its nature in order to expedite the process of inspection. The Head judge, along with two other IASCA certified judges (if available) will inspect the vehicle in question and come to a decision. Their decision will be final on the day of event.

The formal procedure to lodge a protest is as such:

1.Write your protest down in a letter format, with bullet points on the potential infraction.

2.Make a copy for yourself and present the protest to the Head Judge at the event for review.

3.The Head Judge will review the protest and make a decision on the matter.

4.If the decision made is not to the competitor‘s satisfaction, or the protest is being lodged after the show, a copy of the protest must be sent to the IASCA Head Office for review.

22

5.The IASCA Head Office will investigate the protest and come to a decision.

6.If the decision made by IASCA Worldwide is not to the competitor‘s satisfaction, they may appeal the decision to the IASCA Rules and Ethics Committee and present further evidence.

7.In the event you choose to appeal a decision made by the IASCA Worldwide Head Office, a retainer of $250.00USD must be paid to review the appeal. If a decision is made in your favor, your retainer will be returned to you; however, if the decision is made in the favor of the defendant in the protest, the retainer will not be returned.

SOURCE UNITS AND SOFTWARE IN IASCA COMPETITION

The standard reference media for use in IASCA Sound Quality competition is the IASCA Sound Quality Reference CD. At all IASCA Soundoffs, this will be the first media type used for judging; however, with the advent of today‘s technology, alternate source units (such as iPods, MP3 players, Zune Players, etc.) and alternate media (such as flash drives, SD cards, SanDisk cards, etc.) are becoming more commonplace and the time to address their use in competition is here. The following rule sets have been put in place to address Alternate Source Units and Alternate Media:

What is considered an Alternate Source Unit?

An Alternate Source Unit is a device (other than a source unit that can play CDs) that not only stores the digital information, but has the capability of playing the stored information within its design. iPods, MP3 and Zune Players are good examples of what an Alternate Source Unit is.

The general rule of thumb used to differentiate each type is this; if the unit has the capability to play back, track forward/backward or adjust the volume of the media it has stored within its system, it is considered an Alternate Source Unit.

What is considered Alternate Media?

Alternate Media is considered a unit that stores digital media only and does not have the ability to play the media. Alternate Media does not have the capability to play the media within its design and requires an external source unit to play back the media.

Items such as USB Flash Drives and SD or SanDisk Cards are examples of Alternate Media; they can store the digital information, but do not have the capability to play the information stored on them unless they are connected to a system that can read the information and reproduce it.

What do I need to do if I wish to use an Alternate Source Unit or Alternate Media in IASCA competition?

The first thing you need to do when you attend an event to compete, you need to notify the judges immediately upon arriving at the event. You will need to notify them of what type of Alternate Media or Alternate Source Unit you have. The judges will then inspect your vehicle and approve it for competition. NOTE: If your system has a

CD player, it is IASCA‘s recommendation that you use it to be judged, as opposed to using Alternate Media or an Alternate Source Unit, due to the higher quality of recording in the CD (or WAV) format.

23

How do I compete with an Alternate Source Unit or an Alternate Media?

Most IASCA Judges and Event Promoters will have their own Alternate Source Units or Alternate Media to use in IASCA competition.

Competitors may compete with their own device, but must allow the judge to download and delete the judging software. The judge will download only the tracks from the IASCA CD, and will endeavour to record the tracks at the highest quality possible recording level (MP3 files will be downloaded at a rate of 320 kb/s at a constant bit rate to all Alternate Media and Alternate Source Units).

Some events may not have the ability to offer competition with Alternate Media or Alternate Source Units, so it is best to check with the event host before attending, to confirm that they will be offering judging with these devices.

Competitors have the choice to compete with a CD, Alternate Media or an Alternate Source Unit. However, they must bear in mind that competing with anything other than the IASCA Sound Quality Reference CD could potentially affect their scores due to the lower quality of recording in other formats.

How are Alternate Media and Alternate Source Units judged?

Alternate Media is judged no differently than if you were using a CD to compete, because like a CD, they are simply digital media storage units and not players.

However, the unit used to play the Alternate Media will be considered the ―main source unit‖ and will be judged as such in both sound and installation judging.

If an Alternate Source Unit is used to play the source material and the competitor indicates it as the main source unit to be used for operating the controls necessary to judge the system, it will be considered the main source unit and will be judged as such for both sound and installation judging.

However, if the competitor uses an ―in dash‖ unit as their main source unit and an

Alternate Source Unit (mounted in an area separate from the main source unit) is used to play the reference material, the judges will evaluate the ―control‖ unit for judging ergonomics. The Alternate Source Unit will be judged along with the main source unit as part of the installation judging.

24

1 - GOAL

The competitor‘s goal is to build and tune a sound system to reproduce the source material, so that it gives an accurate and realistic reproduction of the original music from a technical standpoint. To create the illusion of listening to the live performance being played.

2 - INTENT

The intent of IASCA‘s Sound Quality Challenge format and its rules is to provide a fair, fun and unbiased sound judging format , evaluating automotive sound systems in five critical areas of sound reproduction; Tonal Accuracy, Sound Stage, Imaging, Linearity and Absence of Noise. The main premise of evaluation is to Judge the system as it would be used in a real world application (the user driving down the road listening to the music). Certain classes are designed for vehicles that are not intended for road use, but that is the main premise.

3 - PURPOSE

The purpose of IASCA SQC is to determine which competing system in each class best reproduces a live performance in the intended conditions, using the official source material in an objective manner, without bias or consideration towards brand, vehicle or installation technique.

4 - CLASSES

Classes in IASCA SQC are based on vehicle modifications and competitor status within the industry. The reason for basing classes on industry status (dealers, distributors, manufacturers) is because industry members typically have a better understanding of sound quality and would have an unfair advantage over those not affiliated with the industry.

25

5 - SQC JUDGING CRITERIA

SQC judging is performed in two methods, one (1) seat (single seat) and two (2) seat. There are variations of each method, dependent on the class being Judged.

The following outlines the general criteria used by Judges when evaluating a vehicle‘s sound system:

ï‚·Judges will evaluate the sound system by the order of the criteria as they appear on the score sheet; 1-Tonal Accuracy & Spectral Balance, 2-Sound Stage, 3-Imaging, 4-Sound Linearity, 5-Absence of Noise.

ï‚·Sound judging for Tonal Accuracy, Sound Stage and Imaging will be performed at a system volume level of 90 dB. If the noise floor at an event is too high to properly Judge at 90 dB, the volume level will be adjusted up in 5dB increments to compensate. The volume level for judging will be set by the Judge using a portable SPL meter, establishing a consistent volume level of evaluation for each vehicle at an event.

All sound judging will be performed from the forward most front seats in the vehicle. One seat judging evaluations will be performed from the driver‘s side seat only. Two seat judging evaluations will be performed from both front seats, either with two Judges (one in each seat) or one Judge evaluating the system twice, once from each front seat. For single seat vehicles, two Judges will evaluate the system from the same seat, one after the other.

ï‚·Sound judging criteria is the same for all classes. Judging will be performed using the Official IASCA Sound Quality Reference CD, utilizing the specified tracks listed for each judging section of the sound rules.

ï‚·For systems without a CD player, an alternate source unit such as an iPod,

MP3 player, memory card or flash drive may be used. It is the competitor‘s responsibility to provide the Judge with the unit to be used; the Judge will upload the music from the IASCA Sound Quality Reference CD to the unit for judging, then delete the files once judging is completed.

ï‚·Judges will utilize the stage maps (as found in these rules) and track maps (In the CD liner notes) to determine some of the sound judging criteria, as required.

6 - SQC CLASSES

Here are the available classes in SQC competition along with a general description of classifications. The classes are broken down in more detail in the following pages:

ï‚·ROOKIE - 1st year competitor only, minor modifications to vehicle interior allowed, no connection to industry, one (1) seat judging

ï‚·AMATEUR - 1st to 4th year competitor, higher level of modifications to vehicle interior allowed, no connection to industry, one (1) seat judging

PRO/AM - Open to all industry and non-industry related competitors (either working in the industry or sponsored by an industry member) who‘s vehicles meet the requirements for the class. Higher level of modifications to vehicle allowed (over Amateur) one (1) seat judging

PRO - Open to all industry and non-industry related competitors (either working in the industry or sponsored by an industry member) who‘s vehicles meet the requirements for the class. Higher level of modifications to vehicle allowed (over Pro/Am) one (1) seat judging

ï‚·ULTIMATE - Same as Pro, but two (2) seat judging

ï‚·EXPERT - Open to all competitors, higher level of modifications to vehicle allowed (over Pro/Am and Pro), two (2) seat judging

ï‚·EXPERT SOLO - Open to all competitors, excessive level of modifications allowed to vehicle, one (1) seat judging by two Judges

26

6.1 - ROOKIE CLASS

6.1.1 - Intent

The intent of the Rookie Class is to provide a place for newcomers to compete in a fair, fun and unbiased format against other competitors of the same experience level. Systems are evaluated by one Judge.

6.1.2 - Competitor Requirements for Rookie Class

ï‚·Competitors must be a first year competitor in car audio competition, whether with IASCA or any other sanctioning organization.

ï‚·Competitors cannot be affiliated with the mobile electronics industry in any way, or receive industry financial support (sponsorship).

Competitors in this Division are limited to one (1) competition season, after which the competitor must choose a higher class to compete in. Should a Rookie competitor wish to enter one of the higher Classes during their Rookie year, they may do so. If for any reason a Rookie cannot compete in at least one (1) IASCA sanctioned event in their first season, they may petition IASCA Worldwide for an extension of their Rookie competition term. It will be the competitor‘s responsibility to notify the proper IASCA affiliate office either in writing or by e-mail.

6.1.3 - Vehicle/System Requirements for Rookie Class

ï‚·The system installation must be performed by the competitor. Shop built installations cannot compete in the Rookie Class.

The vehicle interior must remain a virtually OEM stock ―look‖ and maintain all standard seating positions. Custom made panels, consoles or baffles designed specifically for the purpose of improving the system‘s sound quality are not allowed within the boundaries of the vehicle‘s interior.

Any aftermarket head unit and system speakers (if used) must be mounted in the vehicle‘s OEM factory locations. Exception: An additional pair of tweeters may be used and mounted in a non OEM location within the vehicle.

Any other additional aftermarket equipment used in the vehicle‘s sound system

(such as subwoofers, amplifiers, capacitors, processors, etc.) must be located in the OEM cargo area (or stowage area) or not be visible within the interior compartment of the vehicle.

ï‚·All OEM vehicle functions (such as windows, door locks, sunroof, door handles, etc.) must maintain their functionality. Example: windows designed to roll up and down must be able to completely perform that function without interference from any installed aftermarket component.

ï‚·Aftermarket items such as cell phone holders, iPod docks and their attachment cables are allowed within the boundaries of the vehicle interior.

ï‚·Sound enhancing materials used in the vehicle (such as sound dampening) must not be visible or impede the proper fit of any vehicle panel.

ï‚·All OEM vehicle safety and convenience features which include, but are not limited to, spare tires, airbags, emergency brake, seat belts, seat adjusting mechanisms, etc. must be intact, unmodified and fully operational.

ï‚·There are no limitations to the type and amount of audio equipment used in Rookie Class, so long as it meets all other Vehicle/System Requirements for the Class.

27

6.2 - AMATEUR CLASS

6.2.1 - Intent

The intent of the Amateur Class is to provide a progression from the Rookie Class for competitors as they gain experience in competition and compete against others with the same experience level, with higher level modifications to their vehicles and systems. Systems are evaluated in the one seat judging style (from the driver‘s seat).

6.2.2 - Competitor Requirements for Amateur Class

ï‚·For Competitors with up to 4 years of car audio competition experience. Competitors cannot be affiliated with the mobile electronics industry in any way, or receive industry financial support (sponsorship).

ï‚·Competitors from other organizations may be reclassified to a higher class if it is evident that they possess a higher level of experience than allowed in Amateur Class competition, or if their vehicles exceed the modifications allowed.

6.2.3 - Vehicle/System Requirements for Amateur Class

The system installation must be performed by the competitor. Shop built installations cannot compete in the Amateur Class. The vehicle interior must retain an OEM stock ―look‖ and maintain all standard seating positions.

Modifications are allowed to certain interior cosmetic panels and components. Panels that are allowed to be modified are; kick panels, roof pillar trim pieces (A/B/C pillars), inside door panels, rear parcel shelf, console. Panels and interior vehicle components not listed here (such as the dashboard, seats, seat rails, headliner, floor carpet) cannot be modified in any way other than the replacement or addition of a sound system component used for audio purposes. If you‘re unsure about a modification, contact the IASCA Office.

Aftermarket audio components can be mounted in any of the ―approved for modification‖ panels and components listed above (Example: speakers in kick pods, tweeters/mids in A pillars, head unit in console) as long as they do not compromise the safety of the vehicle, the Judge or impede the proper operation of any of the vehicle‘s safety features.

Any other additional aftermarket equipment used in the vehicle‘s sound system

(such as subwoofers, amplifiers, capacitors, processors, etc.) may be mounted anywhere in the vehicle, so long as the vehicle interior maintains an OEM factory ―look‖

ï‚·All OEM vehicle functions (such as windows, door locks, sunroof, door handles, etc.) must maintain their functionality. Example: windows designed to roll up and down must be able to completely perform that function without interference from any installed aftermarket component.

ï‚·Sound enhancing materials used in the vehicle (such as sound dampening) must not be visible or impede the proper fit of any vehicle panel.

ï‚·All OEM vehicle safety features in the interior of the vehicle which include, but are not limited to, airbags, emergency brake, seat belts, seat adjusting mechanisms, etc. must be intact, unmodified and fully operational. Convenience items such as the spare tire and jack may be removed.

ï‚·There are no limitations to the type and amount of audio equipment used in Amateur Class.

28

6.3 - PRO/AM CLASS

6.3.1 - Intent

The intent of the Pro/Am Class is to provide a progression from the Amateur Class for more experienced competitors, with a higher level of modifications to the vehicle and audio system. Systems are evaluated in the one seat judging style (from the driver‘s seat).

6.3.2 - Competitor Requirements for Pro/Am Class

The Class is open to all industry and non industry related IASCA competitors of Sound Quality competition (either working in the industry or sponsored by an industry member) who‘s vehicles meet the requirements for the class.

ï‚·Competitors with other organizations who possess a high level of skill and experience in Sound Quality competition may be reclassified to this Class

6.3.3 - Vehicle/System Requirements for Pro/Am Class

ï‚·Modifications to any or all interior cosmetic panels or components are allowed, however the vehicle must retain all standard seating positions

ï‚·All OEM vehicle functions (such as windows, door locks, sunroof, door handles, etc.) must maintain their functionality.

ï‚·Aftermarket items such as cell phone holders, iPod docks and their attachment cables are allowed within the boundaries of the vehicle interior.

All OEM vehicle safety features in the interior of the vehicle which include, but are not limited to, airbags, emergency brake, seat belts, etc. must be intact, unmodified and fully operational, forward of the vehicle‘s B pillar. Exception: seat adjusting mechanisms (seat rails) modified to allow for extended travel of the front seats to improve sound quality are allowed.

ï‚·Convenience items such as the spare tire and jack may be removed.

Aftermarket audio components can be mounted in any of the interior panels and components, as long as they do not compromise the safety of the Judge or impede the proper operation of any of the vehicle‘s safety features.

ï‚·There are no limitations to the type and amount of audio equipment used in Pro/Am Class.

6.4 - PRO AND ULTIMATE CLASSES

6.4.1 - Intent

The intent of the Pro and Ultimate Classes are to provide a progression from the Amateur and Pro/Am Classes for more experienced competitors, with a higher level of modifications to the vehicle. Systems are evaluated as one (1) seat in Pro and two (2) seat in Ultimate (front driver and passenger seats).

6.4.2 - Competitor Requirements for Pro and Ultimate Classes

Competitor Requirements are the same as the Pro/Am Class

6.4.3 - Vehicle/System Requirements for Pro and Ultimate Classes

Same as the Pro/Am Class but with the following exceptions;

ï‚·Only the front seating positions need to be maintained

OEM vehicle safety features may be removed or disabled, as long as they do not compromise the safety of the Judge or their ability to evaluate the vehicle‘s sound system.

29

6.5 - EXPERT CLASS

6.5.1 - Intent

The intent of the Expert Class is to offer a competition class for the most highly experienced competitors with vehicles that have extensive modifications beyond the criteria for the lower classes. Modifications to the vehicle are done specifically to increase the performance of the audio system at the highest level from both front seat positions. Systems in Expert Class are evaluated in the two seat judging style (from the front driver and passenger seats).

6.5.2 - Competitor Requirements for Pro Class

Open to all competitors; there are no minimum requirements for this class.

6.5.3 - Vehicle/System Requirements for Pro Class

ï‚·Modifications to interior cosmetic panels or components are allowed, however the vehicle must retain both standard automotive front seating positions.

OEM vehicle functions (such as windows, door locks, sunroof, door handles, etc.) may be disabled or modified, as long as they do not compromise the safety of the Judge or their ability to evaluate the vehicle‘s sound system.

OEM vehicle safety features may be removed or disabled, as long as they do not compromise the safety of the Judge or their ability to evaluate the vehicle‘s sound system.

Aftermarket audio components can be mounted anywhere in the vehicle, as long as they do not compromise the safety of the Judge or their ability to evaluate the vehicle‘s sound system.

ï‚·There are no limitations to the type and amount of audio equipment used in Expert Class, so long as they meet all other Vehicle/System Requirements for the Class.

6.6 - EXPERT SOLO CLASS

6.6.1 - Intent

The intent of the Expert Solo Class is to offer a competition arena for the most highly experienced competitors with vehicles that have extensive modifications beyond the criteria for the lower classes. Modifications to the vehicle are done specifically to create the ideal listening experience from a single seating position in the vehicle. Systems in Expert Solo are evaluated by two Judges from the same seat.

6.6.2 - Competitor Requirements for Pro Class

Open to all competitors; there are no minimum requirements for this class.

6.6.3 - Vehicle/System Requirements for Pro Class

Vehicle/System Requirements in Expert Solo are the same as Expert, but with the following exceptions:

Seating positions may be modified to optimize the listening area for the listener. Any modification of seats or seating position must not compromise the safety of the Judge or their ability to evaluate the vehicle‘s sound system.

ï‚·Vehicles allowed to compete in the Expert Solo Division must be motorized vehicles such as cars, trucks, vans, SUVs, COVs, designed and built by the manufacturer for the purpose of being driven on the road by the general public. Vehicles such as trailers, motorhomes, golf carts, motorcycles, etc. are not eligible to compete.

If a you are unsure whether your vehicle qualifies, contact the IASCA Head Office.

30

7 - JUDGING PROCEDURE

7.1 - PRIOR TO EVALUATION

1.The Judge will introduce themselves to the competitor prior to beginning the evaluation and ask the competitor if they are ready to be evaluated.

2.If a Judge has to return to a vehicle more than twice for any reason to ask the competitor if they are ready, the Judge has the authority to penalize the competitor by deducting 10 points from the overall score for tardiness or delay of judging.

3.They will ask the competitor to instruct them on which source unit is to be used and the proper use of the volume, track selection and main power switch of that source unit. For vehicles with multiple source units and volume controls, the competitor must specify which one (1) source unit and volume control should be used throughout the contest. This is to be indicated to the Sound Judge at the beginning of the judging process. The Judge will mark which unit was used on the score sheet.

4.The Judge will then ask the competitor if they have made all the adjustments they wanted to the system and the vehicle, to ensure that the competitor‘s system and vehicle are ready for evaluation.

5.The Judge is not allowed to evaluate the system and vehicle until the competitor gives approval that the vehicle is ready to be Judged.

6.Once approval is given, the Judge will sit in the vehicle and check the seat position for comfort level during evaluation. The Judge is not allowed to change the position of the seat to evaluate the sound system without first conferring with the competitor. If the seating position is deemed unreasonable, the Judge and competitor will work together to find an acceptable seating position that satisfies both. Any seats that are reclined to more than a 45 degree angle may be considered unreasonable.

7.At this time, the vehicle and system will be evaluated as presented; no other adjustments are allowed.

7.2 - THE EVALUATION

1.During evaluation, the Judge will only adjust the volume, track selection and main power switch controls as needed.

2.The vehicles and systems for all competitors will be evaluated with the engine off, unless extenuating circumstances require that the engine be running. If running the engine is required, the Head Judge will notify all competitors prior to the start of judging.

3.The Judge will use the pink noise track from the CD (or source material) to set the evaluation volume level at 90dB, using the portable SPL meter.

The meter‘s sensor will be positioned directly in front of them, approximately 6 to 12 inches from their face at ear level.

4.The Judge will then test the system for Left and Right Channel Verification. If the system passes this test, the Judge will continue. If the system fails, the Judge will exit the vehicle and notify the competitor, at which time they have 5 minutes to correct the issue. If the issue cannot be corrected in five

(5) minutes, the vehicle and system will be evaluated ―as is‖.

5.The Judge will then continue to evaluate the vehicle in the order of the score sheet, starting with Tonal Accuracy and Spectral Balance, then Sound Stage, Imaging, Linearity and Absence of Noise.

6.Once the Judge has completed the evaluation, they will remove the CD (or source material), all evaluation tools and exit the vehicle.

31

7.3 - AFTER THE EVALUATION IS COMPLETED

1.The Judge will take a moment with the competitor to summarize their evaluation. As their time is limited, they are limited to a brief overview of two minutes or less.

2.The Judge isn‘t allowed to speak about scores or any specifics; they can only cite general areas of interest or concerns within the system and vehicle. No specific questions may be asked by the competitor.

3.The Judge will instruct the competitor that they will be available after the awards ceremony to review their evaluation in greater detail.

4.The Judge will then thank the competitor for the opportunity to evaluate their system and vehicle and excuse themselves to proceed to the next evaluation.

8 - SQC JUDGING GUIDELINES

This section describes the details of what the Judge is looking for when evaluating sound systems in competition. Each subsection will not only describe what is being evaluated, but what the Judge is looking for when evaluating and what the competitor should strive to achieve.

8.1 - TONAL ACCURACY AND SPECTRAL BALANCE

Prior to the beginning of any judging of Tonal Accuracy and Spectral Balance at any and every event, the IASCA Judge will listen to the Official IASCA CD through a quality source that will be utilized as a reference level for the event.

While there is no perfect substitution for a live performance, IASCA recommends that Judges use of a set of studio monitor headphones as the reference level for Tonal Accuracy and Spectral Balance judging, to be used at events to condition their ears tonally before evaluating vehicles. The quality and performance of a high end set of studio monitor headphones will provide one of the most tonally accurate, realistic reproductions of vocals and instruments.

In Tonal Accuracy and Spectral Balance judging, Judges will evaluate the tonal characteristics of the system based on how well it reproduces four specific frequency ranges; Sub Bass, Mid Bass, Mid Range and High Frequencies.

For a system to reproduce a recording with superior tonal accuracy, it must perform without significantly affecting the parameters of these frequency ranges. When all of the above parameters come together well, a system is said to sound natural and spectrally accurate.

The Judge will evaluate whether the sound of the instruments and voices reproduced by the system in these frequency ranges sound real and natural, in and of themselves. When evaluating the system, the Judge will concentrate on instruments in each range specifically, ignoring the relative balance of the whole spectrum (which will be evaluated next).

A Judge will use the six basic characteristics that describe a tone when evaluating Tonal Accuracy and Spectral Balance; Loudness, Pitch, Timbre, Modulation, Duration and Attack & Decay. The descriptions of these characteristics are listed in the glossary of terms at the back of this rule book.

32

What Judges listen for:

The following general guidelines apply to a broad range of music. The judging tracks of the Official IASCA Sound Quality Reference CD may or may not contain some of the instruments listed below. For accurate information on the content of the judging tracks, please refer to the liner notes.

SUB-BASS (1Hz-60Hz) All Divisions

1 to 20 points

The Judge will concentrate on the lowest notes of the large string instruments (bass guitar and stand-up bass, in particular), large drums (kick drums, timpani), low synthesizer sounds, low pipe organ notes, etc. The sounds reproduced by the system in this range should be immediately recognizable, articulate, free of distortion and have proper attack and decay. Accurate low-frequency extension is a desirable trait. An example is the lowest frequency range of very large pipe organs.

MID-BASS (60Hz-200Hz) All Divisions

1 to 20 points

The Judge will focus on the sounds produced by the mid-size drums (tom-toms, large congas, etc.), the middle range of the bass guitar and stand-up bass, lower notes of the piano and synthesizer. These should be reproduced smoothly with good detail and proper attack & decay. Particular attention should be paid to the attack & decay of drums and bass guitars. Because of the small size of the vehicle as a listening area, problems with resonance are common in this frequency range.

MID-RANGE (200Hz-3KHz) All Divisions

1 to 20 points

This range contains the vast majority of musical information in most recordings. The Judge will focus on the human voice, brass instruments, woodwinds, strings, the upper range of the bass guitar, electric and acoustic guitar, synthesizer, piano, smaller drums and other percussion instruments. Resonance and sibilance are common system flaws in this frequency range. Voices should sound full and natural. All instruments should sound realistic without sounding thin, dull or contain uncharacteristic ringing or distortion. Large stringed instruments, for example, should have the characteristic =wood‘ sound without undue resonance.

HIGH FREQUENCIES (3khz-+) All Divisions

1 to 20 points

The Judge will concentrate on cymbals, triangles, bells, the upper frequencies of the snare drum, rim shots, hand clapping, synthesizers, the upper stretches of string and woodwind instruments, and the tendency to exaggerate "s" or "f", or "t" sounds in the voice recordings. These should sound accurate, smooth, neither too dull nor too bright and should not exhibit any harsh, thin, metallic sounds or distortion.

SPECTRAL BALANCE

1 to 20 points

Spectral Balance is a test of the system‘s overall tonal realism at the listening level, encompassing the Tonal Accuracy of the system across the entire frequency spectrum. The same factors described under ―Tonal Accuracy‖ affect overall

Spectral Balance. The system will be judged according to its ability to reproduce the recording as a whole, rather than by dissecting it into individual frequency ranges.

Superior systems will sound effortless and natural with any of the judging tracks. Weaker systems will exhibit distortion, unnatural coloration, dynamic compression, and frequency response errors, which lead to listening fatigue and lend an unnatural sound to the music.

33

Spectral Balance: What Judges Listen For:

The Judge will listen to the ―big picture‖ and score the vehicle on a twenty point scale. Does the system create the illusion of real instruments and voices as you listen to the judging tracks? Is the distribution of energy between the frequency ranges appropriate and natural sounding? Particular attention is paid to how smoothly the system integrates different frequency ranges. As an example, a system may have good sounding high frequency performance in and of itself, but when the level of the high frequencies is compared with the rest of the spectrum, they may be too loud or too quiet.

Tonal Accuracy Scoring Scale

Perfect

20 points

 

 

 

Exceptional

16

- 19 points

 

 

 

Very Good

12

- 15 points

 

 

Good

8 - 11 points

 

 

 

Marginal

2

- 7 points

 

 

 

Needs Improvement

 

1 point

 

 

 

NO Zero Scores are Given

 

 

 

 

 

8.2 - SOUND STAGE

A Sound Stage is the platform where the musical source originates from; it can be quite large (orchestras) or quite small (room in a jazz club). The goal is to reproduce that sound stage as accurately and realistically as possible so that it seems to exceed the physical boundaries of the vehicle interior.

A sound stage is broken down into five factors:

ï‚·Listening Position - The position of the sound stage relative to the listener and the apparent distance of the sound stage from the listener.

ï‚·Stage Width - How wide the stage is from its furthest point to the left to its furthest point to the right

ï‚·Stage Height - How tall the stage is from the floor of the stage to its highest point

ï‚·Stage Depth - How deep the stage is from its furthest point forward to its furthest point back

ï‚·Ambience - The sense of space naturally created by the music and the size of the stage

In Sound Stage judging, the Judge will evaluate how well the vehicle‘s sound system is able to recreate the sound stage and ambient content of the source material being played. The ideal car audio system sound stage will create the illusion that the sound is originating in front of the listener, with additional ambient content. While evaluating Sound Stage, the Judge will draw maps describing the sound stage boundaries for each seat. These maps will not only help in evaluating the sound stage elements, but will be vital to the evaluation of imaging.

The Judge will not let any visual cues (apparent speaker locations or lack of them, for instance) influence their judgment. Sound Quality Judges have been trained to be

―blind‖ to any equipment in the vehicle or any distractions that interfere with their ability to properly determine the sound stage.

34

LISTENING POSITION

1 to 15 points

The best systems will give the illusion of the stage being well in front of the listener, exceeding the front boundary of the vehicle. This is considered ideal as it approximates the experience of listening to a live concert.

The Judge will base scoring on the distance between themselves and the perceived front boundary of the sound stage.

Listen carefully to the bass. Does it seem to come from up front or from behind? Maximum points within each scoring tier will only be given to systems that convincingly create the illusion that all the sound originates from the specified location.

Some systems will exhibit some localization of sub bass towards the rear, but still maintain a forward listening position. Judges should not drop these vehicles to the

―behind the listening position‖ scoring tier.

In this situation, a Judge should deduct 2 points for obvious rear-bass within the scoring tier established by the higher frequencies (mid-bass and up) and make note of that action on the score sheet. In no case should a vehicle be dropped to a lower tier for rear sub bass only.

These are general guidelines for scoring. Keep in mind that if a vehicle exhibits different characteristics for each seat in two seat judging, the Judges are instructed to arrive at a score for each seat and then average them to arrive at a final score.

Example: A vehicle may score 13 points from one seat and 9 points from the opposite seat. The sum of the scores (from both seats) is 22, which is then divided by 2 for a score of 11 points for listening position.

Listening Position Scoring Scale

Sound stage exceeds front boundary of vehicle interior

 

12

- 15 pts.

 

 

Sound stage originates at or near front boundary of interior

9 - 11 pts.

 

 

 

 

Sound stage originates directly in front of listeners

 

7

- 8 pts.

 

 

 

 

Sound stage appears to be at the listening position

 

5

- 6 pts.

 

 

 

Sound stage originates from behind or is impossible to define

1

- 4 pts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Listening Position Chart Point Scale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

14

13

12

11

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

35

STAGE WIDTH

1 to 15 points

Stage Width refers to the distance between the left and right boundaries of the sound stage and is evaluated in relation to the listening position to the sound stage and the stage depth.

What Judges listen for:

The judging tracks on the official IASCA Sound Quality Reference CD, in conjunction with the enclosed liner notes, allows the Judge to quickly and accurately evaluate stage width.

The Judge will focus on the original dimensions of the room, as outlined in the software notes, in relation to the listener. The system‘s reproduction of the music should not artificially compress or expand stage width. The Judge will listen for additional stage width cues beyond the furthest left and right instruments/vocalists. In many recordings, there is additional space beyond them that can be heard. These are general guidelines for scoring. If, in two seat judging, a vehicle exhibits different stage width characteristics for each seat, the Judges are instructed to arrive at a score for each seat individually then average these scores to arrive at the final score.

NOTE: If a sound stage originates beyond the interior boundaries of the vehicle (e.g. on the hood as an example), Stage Width should be evaluated using outer markers on the vehicle, such as the fenders. Using a vehicle‘s interior boundaries

(such as A pillars) as a reference (in this example) is incorrect.

Example:

When evaluated from one seat (driver‘s), the Judge will determine the score by identifying the ends of the stage width on the left and right sides respectively. If the left side seemingly ends outside the vehicle at the mirror or beyond, the Judge deducts 0 points. If the right side seemingly ends over the middle of the passenger glove box area the Judge deducts 3 points. The sum of this score is a 3-point deduction from the original 15 point scale for a score of 12. When evaluated by two Judges, the same principle is used from each seat, then the two scores are added together and divided by 2 to establish the stage width score.

Stage Width Scoring Scale

Stage extends beyond lateral vehicle boundaries

14

- 15 pts.

 

 

 

Stage extends to both lateral vehicle boundaries

10

- 13 pts.

 

 

 

Wide stage almost extends to lateral vehicle boundaries.

6

- 9 pts.

 

 

 

Narrow stage well short of lateral vehicle boundaries

2

- 5 pts.

 

 

 

Stage width is severely compressed (virtual mono)

 

1 pt.

 

 

 

36

STAGE HEIGHT

1 to 15 points

Stage height refers to the apparent height of the sound stage and the vertical spread above that level. The center of the vertical spread of the stage should be at horizon level with appropriate instruments/vocalists being above or below this plane from left to right of the stage. The height of the stage should also remain horizontal from the front of the stage, where the lead singer may be placed, to the rear of the stage, where the drums may be located. This spread should not be exaggerated or incoherent and should be proportional to the other stage dimensions.

What Judges listen for:

Systems with good stage height properties will produce a stable sound stage at horizon level with a natural sense of vertical space above that point. Instruments and voices should sound complete and whole at that height with no portion of them coming from below the sound stage floor. The Judge will look for the stage height to remain stable from left to right and front to rear. Some vehicles may exhibit good height in the center with left and right boundaries dropping lower (or vice versa) and this will be taken into account in the scoring. Some vehicles may also exhibit good height within the high frequencies but the lower mid bass and bass frequencies are well below the dash.

These are the guidelines for scoring Stage Height. The Judge will write comments describing the sound stage height after evaluation. If a vehicle exhibits different stage height characteristics for each seat (two seat judging), the Judges are instructed to arrive at a score for each seat, add the 2 scores then divide by 2 to arrive at the final score. The Judges should note when averaging is used to arrive at a stage height score, they will write the individual seat scores in the comments section of the score sheet.

Stage Height Scoring Diagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13 - 15

 

13 - 15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9 - 12

 

 

 

9 - 12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 - 8

 

 

 

6 - 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 - 5

 

 

 

3 - 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 - 2

 

 

 

1 - 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage Height Scoring Scale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage is at horizon level with no hint of instability

 

13 - 15pts.

 

 

 

 

from left to right

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage is mainly at horizon level, with some instability

 

9 - 12 pts.

 

 

 

 

from side to side

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage is lower than horizon level but stable left to right or Stage is at

6 - 8 pts.

 

 

 

 

horizon level but very unstable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage is low and unstable

 

 

3 - 5 pts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage is impossible to define

 

 

1 - 2 pts.

37

STAGE DEPTH

1 to 15 points

Sound Stage Depth is the perceived physical depth of the stage, from the forward most point to the rearmost point of the stage, in relation to the listening position in the vehicle. The perceived position of the instruments or vocals on the stage, either behind or in front of each other, creates that perceived stage ―depth‖.

What Judges listen for:

The Judge will compare what they hear from the system in regards to instrument and vocalist position (from the front to the rear of the stage) in relation to the Stage Depth maps in the CD liner notes. If the system exhibits a realistic, almost three dimensional interpretation of those instruments and vocalists in their proper order on the sound stage, it will score well.

These are general guidelines for scoring. The Judge will write comments describing the stage depth. If in two seat judging, a vehicle exhibits different stage depth characteristics for each seat, the Judges are instructed to arrive at a score for each seat, add the two (2) scores together then divide by two (2) to arrive at the final score. The Judges should note that when averaging is used to arrive at a stage depth score, they should write the individual seat scores in the L / R space provided in the comments section of the score sheet.

Stage Depth Scoring Scale

 

 

Stage exhibits realistic sense of depth

 

12

- 15 points

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage exhibits good sense of depth

 

8 - 11 points

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage exhibits some sense of depth

 

2

- 7 points

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage is impossible to define

 

 

1 point

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NO Zero Scores are Given

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage Depth Chart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Listening Position

 

 

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

Perceived rear of stage

 

Perceived front of stage

This Diagram Exhibits the Scoring Perspective for Stage Depth.

NOTE: The position of the stage in this chart is an example only. A system can score well in Stage Depth whether the stage is either further away or closer to the listening position.

38

 

Drums

Saxophone

Tuba

Horns

Tambourine

Bass

Horns

Guitar

Guitar

 

Harmonica

 

 

Piano

This picture depicts a sound system that appears to reproduce a realistic sense of

Stage Depth. When evaluating depth, it should appear that there is distance

 

between the instruments.

AMBIENCE

1 to 10 points

Ambience can be defined as the perceived sense of space around a sound source. Most recordings contain ambient cues, which are either naturally created by the room used for recording or created by recording engineers using processing equipment. These cues can interact with the acoustics of the vehicle and the design of the sound system to help create that sense of space.

What Judges listen for:

The Judge will envision the size of the ―room‖ the music was recorded in and listen for ambient cues that help them create a feeling of being in that room. The ambient cues should sound natural to the size of, and recreate the feeling of being in, the room the music was recorded in.

These are general guidelines for scoring. Keep in mind that in two seat judging, if a vehicle exhibits different ambient characteristics from each seat, the Judges are instructed to arrive at a score for each seat, add the scores together then average these scores to arrive at the final score. The Judges should note on the score sheet when averaging is used to arrive at a final score and write the individual seat scores in the comments section of the score sheet.

Ambience Scoring Scale

Realistic Ambience / Sounds like an appropriate room

8 - 10 points

 

 

Slightly closed in / Sounds like a very small room

4 - 7 points

 

 

Lack of ambience / Sounds like a very confined area

2 - 3 points

 

 

Overbearing /Artificial ambient effect

1 point

NO Zero Scores are Given

39

8.3 - IMAGING

The term “imaging” describes a system’s ability to reproduce the sounds of instruments and vocals in their correct locations and proportions on the sound stage. Correct locations are defined by their placement as they were actually recorded. Systems are evaluated based on their ability to place instruments and vocals accurately in their positions across the sound stage.

Points Breakdown for Imaging Judging

 

IMAGING: FAR-LEFT

1 to 10 points

Far-Left Vocal or Instrument

 

IMAGING: LEFT OF CENTER

1 to 10 points

Left-of-Center Vocal or Instrument

 

IMAGING: CENTER

1 to 10 points

Center Vocal or Instrument

 

IMAGING: RIGHT OF CENTER

1 to 10 points

Right-of-Center Vocal or Instrument

 

IMAGING: FAR-RIGHT

1 to 10 points

Far-Right Vocal or Instrument

 

Detailed sound stage maps in the liner notes of the Official IASCA Competition CD provide the exact locations of specific instruments and voices in the recordings used to evaluate this category. These maps have been produced in conjunction with the recording engineers who produced the tracks.

The Judge will listen for and reward properly placed, coherent, and defined images that accurately convey the size of the instrument relative to the soundstage. Particular attention should be paid to whether or not the sound of the instrument or vocal is focused and properly placed in its correct location on the soundstage (i.e. a piano may be very large relative to a saxophone). If an image seems unnaturally wide, or the image wanders as the pitch changes, or if it seems to split into two or more images, points will be deducted. Height should also be consistent (the lower part of the voice should not come from the foot well, while the rest of it is up high).

Judges Use the Following Scale to Score Imaging (No zero scores given)

 

Images are correctly defined (Focused) and located (Placement)

10 points

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Images are well defined and located, but not perfect (Excellent)

8-9 points

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Images are somewhat diffused and shifted in location (good)

6-7 points

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Images are diffused and somewhat difficult to place (average)

3-5 points

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Images are very diffused and very difficult to locate (below average)

1-2 points

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LC

RC

 

 

 

 

L

LC

C

RC

R

 

 

 

R

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Example of poor placement, focus and detail.

Example of good placement, focus and detail.

40

8.4 - SOUND LINEARITY

The object of this section is to evaluate an audio system's ability to reproduce a recording with accurate spectral balance and accurate dynamics at varying volume levels.

The Judge will use the instructions on the dedicated Sound Linearity track for setting the base level at approximately 81dB peak using the portable SPL meter. Once the setting is done, the Judge will not touch the volume control until after all the sound linearity tracks are completed. Each linearity track will play for 20 seconds at the decibel ranges listed below. Each musical sample is identical, so the Judge can directly compare spectral balance and dynamics. The Judge will score the system by how well it reproduces the music spectrally and dynamically at each volume level.

What Judges will listen for:

At the lower volume level (Track 21), the Judge will listen for low, mid and high frequency changes as the level increases. They will pay particular attention to the dynamic impact...does it increase, or improve, as the track varies between its average and peak dB levels. Is it noticeably diminished at the lower levels? Sub Bass extension at lower levels will naturally decrease and this is taken into consideration when evaluating Track 21.

At high levels, the Judge will listen for smooth spectral balance and solid, realistic dynamics. Instruments should have a realistic attack and impact that does not get compressed by distortion (amplifier clipping or speaker system limitations). The relative level between low, mid and high frequencies should be natural and realistic, with no section overpowering another. Points should be deducted for any unnatural harshness or distortion.

 

 

 

 

Soft Volume - 81 dB peak/74 dB avg. (Track 21)

1 to 10 points

Moderate Volume - 93 dB peak/86 dB avg. (Track 22)

1 to 10 points

Loud Volume - 105 dB peak/98 dB avg. (Track 23)

1 to 10 points

 

 

System Linearity Scoring Scale

Perfect

10 points

 

 

 

Exceptional

8 - 9

points

 

 

 

Very Good

6 - 7

points

 

 

 

Good

4 - 5

points

 

 

Marginal

2 - 3 points

 

 

Needs Improvement

1 point

 

 

 

NO Zero Scores are Given

 

 

 

 

 

41

8.5 - ABSENCE OF NOISE

A well executed installation, with a properly adjusted gain structure, should be free from noise at all listening levels. Noise is defined as any sound not present in the original program material that has been added by either the vehicle’s electronics, charging or audio system.

The following rules apply to evaluating the Absence of Noise section:

1.Each system is evaluated using the dedicated Absence of Noise Tracks (25 and 27) on the current Official IASCA Sound Quality Reference CD. Judges will determine the audibility of noise from a normal seated listening position.

2.Alternator failures (non-existent or unusually weak charging voltage that causes noise through the system) will result in an automatic score of one (1) point only for alternator whine.

3.The Judge will listen for noise under two conditions; a) Engine running and high beams on to test for vehicular noise (induced by the vehicle's charging system or electronics) and b) Engine off with the key in the ―Accessory‖ position, then switched past ―Off‖ to the ―On‖ position (not ignition) to test for system noises.

4.The charging system must be in proper working order with the alternator producing an increase in DC voltage output while the engine is running. Other than a voltage regulator, the use or existence of any circuit, switch or device designed to affect the operation of the alternator while the engine is running will result in a loss of points. Intentionally disconnected alternators or the use/ existence of any circuit, switch or other device for the purpose of disconnecting the system‘s wiring from an alternator‘s charging circuit could result in disqualification from an event.

5.If a vehicle tests clean for alternator whine, the Judge may request that the charging system be verified. This test will be done at the amplifier‘s 12V input connections. These must be made accessible within 90 seconds, upon request by the Judges.

6.The main system power switch must control the turning on and turning off of ALL audio system components. The switch must power down the system's amplifiers and external processors completely and must stop the motion of any CD loaded into the head unit/s. Additionally, the power switch when turned on or off, must power up or power down the system and begin playing or stop playing music within thirty (30) seconds of activation. Failure to do so will result in a score of one (1) point in the Turn On and Turn Off categories. NOTE: For source units that do not have a power switch that turns the system completely off and on, a separate, dedicated power switch may be installed for Turn On/Off judging. It is the competitor‘s responsibility to notify the Judge of such a switch if being used.

Absence of Noise Scoring Scale

Perfect. No detectable noise

5 points

 

 

One barely noticeable noise, pop and/or click

3 - 4 points

 

 

Two or more noticeable noises, pops and/or clicks

2 points

 

 

Severe Noise, multiple pops or clicks. Noises are at a level

 

above the listening material or one or more pieces of

1 point

equipment are not turning on or off

 

 

 

42

TURN-ON/OFF NOISE (Engine OFF)

1 to 5 points

Turn-On/Off Noise is a popping, thumping or clicking noise heard through the system‘s speakers when the system is powered up and powered down by the main system power on/off switch.

Testing will be performed using the Zero Bit track (track 27) with the volume set at a moderate level. Only the main system power switch is to be used to turn the system on or off. The ignition switch is not to be used. For deductions to apply, noises must be audible from a normal seating position.

If a system is completely quiet in this test, the Judge has the authority to test the system to determine whether all equipment is truly turning on and off. The burden of proof is on the competitor. If a competitor cannot convincingly show that their equipment is turning on and off, the Judge will make note of it on the score sheet and award points based on their conclusion.

FLOOR NOISE (Engine OFF)

1 to 5

points

 

Floor noise (also known as Gain Hiss) is a hissing sound between audio tracks that is audible from a normal seating position, during quiet sections of the program material. Other noises that may affect scoring in the Floor Noise section include, but are not limited to, hums (from power supplies or other sources) and popping or clicking sounds while the system is playing (not at Turn On or Turn Off).

Rules for Floor Noise Testing:

Using the track designated for Noise Testing on the Official IASCA Sound Quality Reference CD (track 25), the volume is set to a moderate (approx. 90dB) level at the beginning of the track. As the level of the track decreases, Judges will increase volume as the level of the track decreases to maintain a consistent output level until maximum volume is reached, then listen for hiss within the system. If no noise is heard the score would be five (5) points. If a slight detection or a barely noticeable noise is heard the score would be four (4) points, etc.

EXTERNAL MECHANICAL NOISE

1 to 5 points

Any air flow or mechanical noise that is produced by anything audio system related, other than the audio equipment in the system, while the system is playing and during turn on and turn off, may receive points deductions. This scoring can be done simultaneously while listening for Floor Noise. Mechanical noises that appear to come directly from audio equipment will NOT receive any point deductions. EXAMPLE: If the noise is caused by an external relay used as a remote turn on/off, points will be deducted; however, if the relay noise originates from the equipment itself, no points will be deducted.

ALTERNATOR WHINE

1 to 5

points

 

This test is performed with the engine running and the lights on in the “high beam” setting.

Alternator Whine is a high-pitched whine audible through the speakers when the engine is running. It may or may not vary in loudness as the volume control is adjusted up and down but it will vary in frequency as the engine is revved.

Note: Track # 25 is designated to be used for noise testing in this test. The Judge will start the track at a moderate level and as the level of the recording drops, they will raise the volume to maintain the level. As the track fades away, the volume should be raised to its maximum level.

43

Many engines produce whining sounds from various different mechanical actions (turbochargers, alternators spinning, etc.). The Judge must carefully determine whether the noise is actually coming from the system itself. To do this, a Judge may move their heads closer to the speakers to establish its origin only, not to measure the audibility of the noise.

Switching the system on and off to determine whether the noise occurs only when the system is on may not be a completely reliable test, because it is possible for alternator whine to be radiated into a powered down system. This is very rare, but it does happen.

ERGONOMICS

1 to 5 points

The Judge will evaluate whether the system can be operated (Volume, track selection, power on/off) without unreasonable distraction from the road.

Since the Sound Quality Judge is actually listening to and operating the audio system, they will evaluate Ergonomics from a normal seated position in the driver's seat at the seat position selected by the competitor for Sound Quality judging. Only display visibility, volume, track selection and on/off switches will be evaluated to determine if the system is safe to operate while driving.

Ergonomics Scoring Scale:

System easy to access and operate safely 5 points

All user-adjusted components (display visibility, volume, track selection, and on/off switches only) are easily located within the sight and reach of the driver, capable of being operated with no prompting and without jeopardizing the safe operation of the vehicle. With multiple volume controls, the competitor must specify which one (1) volume control should be used throughout the contest. This is to be indicated to the Judge at the beginning of the evaluation process.

System easy to access but difficult to operate 4 points

All user-adjusted components are easily located within the sight and reach of the driver, but require the use of multiple power controls in order to operate the system. - OR- The location of the controls or panels may be cause for the driver to glance at the panel to make adjustments, thus creating a potential for vehicular operational risk.

System easy to operate but difficult to access. 3 points

User adjusted components are located out of sight or reach of the driver, but can be easily operated with no prompting.

System difficult to operate and difficult to access 1- 2 points

User adjusted components are located out of sight or reach of the driver and require the use of multiple power controls in order to operate the system.

44

9 - SQC COMPETITION TIE BREAKERS

Tie scores in SQC or ISQC are settled in this sequence:

1.The vehicle with the highest Tonal Accuracy score wins.

2.If a tie remains, the vehicle with the highest Sound Stage score wins.

3.If a tie remains, the vehicle with the highest Imaging score wins.

4.If a tie remains, the vehicle with the highest Linearity score wins.

5.If a tie remains, the vehicle with the highest Absence of Noise score wins.

6.If a tie remains, affected competitors will equally share the position.

10 - CHANGING SQC CLASSES

In SQC competition, a competitor may move up in Class, but cannot move down. If a competitor wishes to move down in Class, it is at the sole discretion of the IASCA Head Office to approve the Class change.

All petitions for a Class change must be submitted electronically by email or in writing, listing the circumstances and sent to the IASCA Head office or affiliate office for approval. Petitions will be examined on a case by case basis.

11 - GLOSSARY OF TERMS

SIX BASIC CHARACTERISTICS FOR DESCRIBING A TONE

Loudness: The magnitude of the auditory sensation produced by the sound (can be affected by equalization or improper level matching between speakers).

Pitch: The subjective quality of a sound which determines its position on a musical scale. (Excessive distortion and non-linearity can affect pitch.)

Timbre: The interaction of the harmonics and fundamentals of a sound which give it it‘s sonic signature. (Example: The sound of a guitar can be affected by poor reproduction of high frequencies in the system if the harmonics of the fundamental tones produced by the guitar are not reproduced accurately.)

Modulation: A change in amplitude, phase or frequency which occurs to a sound. (Can be affected by systems with phase problems, frequency response problems, etc.)

Duration: Literally, the duration of a sound (for example this can be affected by systems with poor transient response or panel resonance).

Attack and Decay: The time it takes for a sound to build up (attack) or die down (decay). Attack and decay can be affected by systems with poor transient response, panel resonance and excessive reflections.

OTHER TERMS

Accurate (Accuracy) - Precise, free from errors, capable of providing information in accordance with an accepted standard

Ambience (Ambient) - An atmosphere, feeling of being in the room where the music was recorded

Baffle/s - Panels built, or created specifically, to redirect or enhance the sound quality characteristics of a system.

45

GLOSSARY OF TERMS (continued)

Cargo area - The common area in a vehicle used to store cargo. In a car, the cargo area would be referred to as the trunk, or boot. In trucks it is referred to as the bed, or box. In minivans, SUVs and crossover vehicles, it is the area directly behind the second row of seats.

Characteristics - A feature or quality that makes somebody or something recognizable; distinguishing or representative of a particular person or thing

Coherent - logically or aesthetically consistent and holding together as a harmonious or credible whole.

Coloration - The ability of a system component to give the sound a unique characteristic that is unnatural to or not recorded in the original reproduction.

Decibel - A unit of relative loudness, electric voltage, or current equal to ten times the common logarithm of the ratio of two readings. For sound, the decibel scale runs from zero for the least perceptible sound to 130 for sound that causes pain and beyond. The symbol for decibel is dB.

Dynamics - In reference to music, the different levels of loudness and softness in a piece of music, and the way in which a performer reproduces them within the performance.

Driver’s seat - In IASCA competition, the term refers to the main seat used to operate the vehicle in normal driving conditions. It is the seat immediately behind the vehicle‘s steering wheel with access to the gas and brake pedals.

Ergonomics - The factors or qualities in the design of an item that contribute to its comfort, efficiency, safety, and ease of use.

Industry - The term ―Industry‖ by IASCA‘s definition refers to the Mobile Electronics

Industry and any facet of any other industry that directly relates to mobile electronics.

Kick pods (or Kick Panels) - Pods or panels built to house speakers that are positioned in the vehicle‘s foot well area, designed specifically to enhance or improve the sound quality characteristics of the vehicle and system.

Live concert environment - The ability of a vehicle and sound system to reproduce the feeling and emotion of a live concert for the listener.

Noise Floor - The volume level of any ambient noise in the area of the vehicle, in relation to the listening volume level of the system evaluation.

Newcomers - Somebody who has recently arrived, appeared, or been introduced to the sport of car audio competition who is competing in their first season.

OEM - Abbreviation for ―Original Equipment Manufacturer‖, referring to both the automotive and mobile electronics industries, for the purposes of these rules. When OEM is referred to through this text, it signifies the original equipment the vehicle or components came with from the factory when it was originally assembled.

46

GLOSSARY OF TERMS (continued)

Parameters - A fact or set of guidelines that restricts how something is done or what can be done within those facts or guidelines.

Pillars - The posts that hold up the roof of the vehicle. The front pillars at the windshield are commonly referred to as the ―A‖ pillars, the center pillars at the middle of the roof are referred to as the ―B‖ pillars and the rear pillars at the back window are referred to as the ―C‖ pillars.

Realism - The simulation of the music by the sound system in a way that accurately resembles the live recording of that music.

Realistic - Simulating the music in a way that seems real.

Reproductions - The act or process of reproducing the music through the sound system using the source material.

Resonance - An intense and prolonged sound produced by sympathetic vibration, usually caused by the reproduction of the music by the sound system vibrating a panel in the vehicle. Resonance is the effect of a panel continuing to vibrate, reproducing a frequency after the musical equivalent of that frequency has stopped playing through the system.

Sense of Space - The ability of the sound system being able to give the listener a

―feeling‖ of being in the area where the music was originally recorded.

Sibilance - The hissing sound created when certain consonants are vocalized, such as the letter ―s‖. Can be compared to the sound made by a tire losing air.

Spectrum - The complete range of audio frequencies from the lowest bass to the highest highs the average human ear can perceive, commonly referred to as the

―Sound Spectrum‖.

Stock - Term used when referencing a vehicle, to reference the original (or OEM) appearance of that vehicle, before any modifications were made.

Vehicle - The word ―vehicle‖ is used as a general term referring to all motor powered cars, trucks, vans, SUV‘s, Crossovers and minivans. To qualify as a ―vehicle‖ under IASCA‘s definition, the unit used to house the sound system being evaluated must have a motor that powers it, a transmission, an electrical system, a front and rear axle (one of which must be the driving axle), a steering wheel and a seat from which to control the unit while it is in motion. A trailer with a ―tow vehicle‖ attached does not meet the definition; it must be one unit containing at minimum all of the above criteria.

Unsafe - Any item in a vehicle being evaluated that is deemed to be putting the Judge at physical risk while performing the evaluation will be considered as unsafe.

47

12 - COMMENTS AND SUGGESTIONS

IASCA Worldwide strives to bring its competitors the fairest sound competition available, yet still maintain a level of intensity that drives competitors to excel.

Like any competition organization, whether it be audio related or not, we are not perfect; we‘re constantly reviewing our rule set to improve on the foundation that made IASCA the premier organization for soundoff competition.

Your input matters… we want to hear your ideas, comments and suggestions for improving. If you have an idea on how we can make IASCA better for you, the competitor, please send your ideas to us at memberservices@iasca.com.

13 - PROTESTS

There are times when rules will be questioned and a competitor will feel that there has been a misinterpretation of a rule, or a rule was broken, or that they have been taken advantage of in competition.

If you, as a competitor, feel that this has happened, you have the ability to launch a formal protest regarding the matter in question. The formal procedure to lodge a protest is as such:

1.Write your protest down in a letter format, with bullet points on the potential infraction.

2.Make a copy for yourself and present the protest to the Head Judge at the event for review.

3.The head Judge will review the protest and make a decision on the matter.

4.If the decision made is not to your satisfaction, or the protest is being lodged after the show, send a copy to the IASCA Head Office for review.

5.The IASCA Head Office will investigate the protest and come to a decision.

6.If the decision made by IASCA Worldwide is not to your satisfaction, you may appeal the decision to the IASCA Rules and Ethics Committee and present further evidence.

7.In the event you choose to appeal a decision made by the IASCA Worldwide Head Office, a retainer of $250.00USD must be paid. If a decision is made in your favor, your retainer will be returned to you; however, if the decision is made in the favor of the defendant in the protest, the retainer will not be returned.

IASCA Worldwide Inc.,

2200 S. Ridgewood Ave.,

South Daytona, FL, 32119

Ph (386) 322-1551 Fax (386) 761-1740 www.iasca.com

Email - memberservices@iasca.com

Our website now features a full messaging center (instant messenger), chat rooms, forums and dealer search engine!

48

1 - GOAL

The goal of the competitor is to design, build and install a sound system to meet or exceed the standards for installation as set out in these rules. Safety, cosmetic, integrity and craftsmanship aspects are evaluated.

2 - INTENT

The intent of IASCA‘s Installation Quality Challenge format and its rules is to provide a fair, fun and unbiased judging format, evaluating the installation of automotive sound systems and related components in four main criteria; Safety, Integrity, Integration and Craftsmanship.

In IQC, competitors are also evaluated on their knowledge of the system and its construction through Presentation and Creative Elements scoring.

3 - PURPOSE

The purpose of IASCA IQC is to raise the standard of sound system installation, educating consumers and industry members alike to the benefit of a properly installed sound system, without bias or consideration towards brand or vehicle, aiding in the promotion of system longevity and durability.

4 - CLASSES

Classes in IASCA IQC are based on vehicle modifications and competitor status within the industry. The reason for basing classes on industry status is persons working in the industry (dealers, distributors, manufacturers) typically have a better understanding of installation quality and would have an unfair advantage over those who are not affiliated with the industry.

49

5 - IQC JUDGING CRITERIA

IQC judging is performed using one judge who will evaluate the installation of the sound system in an objective manner, using the standards set in this rule book.

Judges will evaluate the installation of the sound system in the order of the criteria on the score sheet; 1-Membership, 2– Presentation, 3 - System Safety, 4-Installation Integrity, 5-Cosmetic Integration, 6-Craftsmanship, 7 - Creative Elements.

ï‚·All Installation judging will be performed by one judge, with the exception of the higher Classes at major events, as determined by the Head Judge.

ï‚·IQC judging criteria is the same for all classes, with the exception of Creative Elements scoring levels.

ï‚·Judges will utilize the charts as found in these rules to determine some of the installation judging criteria, as required.

ï‚·In the case of a tie, the winner will be determined by the highest score in the

following sections, in the following order;

1.Creative Elements

2.Craftsmanship

3.Cosmetic Integration

4.Installation Integrity

5.System Safety

6.Presentation

7.If a tie remains, the competitors will share the position equally.

GENERAL VEHICLE INFORMATION (All IQC Classes)

Vehicles allowed to compete in IQC must be motorized vehicles such as cars, trucks, vans, SUVs, COVs, designed and built by the manufacturer for the purpose of being driven on the road by the general public.

Vehicles such as trailers, motorhomes, golf carts, motorcycles, etc. are not eligible to compete.

6 - IQC CLASSES

IQC Classes are based on the competitor‘s experience as well as the modifications to the vehicle. The classes are broken down in more detail in the following pages:

ï‚·ROOKIE - 1st year competitor only, minor modifications to vehicle interior allowed, no connection to industry

ï‚·AMATEUR - 1st to 4th year competitor, higher level of modifications to vehicle interior allowed, no connection to industry

PRO/AM - Open to all industry and non industry related competitors (either working in the industry or sponsored by an industry member) who‘s vehicles meet the requirements for the class. Higher level of modifications to vehicle allowed (over Amateur)

PRO and ULTIMATE - Open to all industry and non industry related competitors (either working in the industry or sponsored by an industry member) who‘s vehicles meet the requirements for the class. Higher level of modifications to vehicle allowed. The difference between Pro and Ultimate in IQC is Creative Element points (120 for Pro, 150 for Ultimate)

ï‚·EXPERT - Open to all competitors, higher level of modifications to vehicle allowed (over Pro)

ï‚·EXPERT SOLO - Open to all competitors, excessive level of modifications allowed to vehicle

50

6.1 - ROOKIE CLASS

6.1.1 - Intent

The intent of the Rookie Class is to provide a place for newcomers to compete in a fair, fun and basic format against other competitors of the same experience level. Systems are evaluated by one judge.

6.1.2 - Competitor Requirements for Rookie Class

ï‚·Competitors must be a first year competitor in car audio competition, whether with IASCA or any other sanctioning organization.

ï‚·Competitors cannot be affiliated with the mobile electronics industry in any way, or receive industry support (sponsorship).

Competitors in this Division are limited to one (1) competition season, after which the competitor must choose a higher class to compete in. Should a Rookie competitor wish to enter one of the higher Classes during their Rookie year, they may do so. However, once the choice is made to do so, they cannot be reclassified as a Rookie. If for any reason a Rookie cannot compete in at least one (1) IASCA sanctioned event in their first season, they may petition IASCA Worldwide for an extension of their Rookie competition term. It will be the competitor‘s responsibility to notify the proper IASCA affiliate office either in writing or by e-mail.

6.1.3 - Vehicle/System Requirements for Rookie Class

ï‚·The system installation must be performed by the competitor. Shop built installations cannot compete in the Rookie Class.

The vehicle interior must remain a virtually OEM stock ―look‖ and maintain all standard seating positions. Custom made panels, consoles or baffles designed specifically for the purpose of improving the system‘s sound quality are not allowed within the boundaries of the vehicle‘s interior. Cosmetic improvements such as painted or recovered interior panels are allowed.

Any aftermarket head unit and system speakers (if used) must be mounted in the vehicle‘s OEM factory locations. Exception: An additional pair of tweeters may be used and mounted in a non OEM location within the vehicle.

Any other additional aftermarket equipment used in the vehicle‘s sound system

(such as subwoofers, amplifiers, capacitors, processors, etc.) must be located in the OEM cargo area (or stowage area), or not be visible within the interior compartment of the vehicle.

ï‚·All OEM vehicle functions (such as windows, door locks, sunroof, door handles, etc.) must maintain their functionality. Example: windows designed to roll up and down must be able to completely perform that function without interference from any installed aftermarket component.

ï‚·Aftermarket items such as cell phone holders, iPod docks and their attachment cables are allowed within the boundaries of the vehicle interior.

ï‚·Sound enhancing materials used in the vehicle (such as sound damping) must not be visible or impede the proper fit of any vehicle panel.

ï‚·All OEM vehicle safety and convenience features which include, but are not limited to, spare tires, airbags, emergency brake, seat belts, seat adjusting mechanisms, etc. must be intact, unmodified and fully operational.

ï‚·There are no limitations to the type and amount of audio equipment used in Rookie Class, so long as it meets all other requirements for the Class.

51

6.2 - AMATEUR CLASS

6.2.1 - Intent

The intent of the Amateur Class is to provide a progression from the Rookie Class for competitors as they gain experience in competition and compete against others with the same experience level, with higher level modifications to their vehicles and systems. Systems are evaluated by 1 judge.

6.2.2 - Competitor Requirements for Amateur Class

ï‚·Competitors cannot be affiliated with the mobile electronics industry in any way, or receive industry support (sponsorship).

ï‚·For Competitors with up to 4 years of car audio competition experience.

ï‚·Competitors from other organizations may be reclassified to a higher class if it is evident that they possess a higher level of experience than allowed in Amateur Class competition, or if their vehicles exceed the modifications allowed.

6.2.3 - Vehicle/System Requirements for Amateur Class

ï‚·The system installation must be performed by the competitor. Shop built installations cannot compete in the Amateur Class.

The vehicle interior must retain an OEM stock ―look‖ and maintain all standard seating positions. Cosmetic improvements such as painted or recovered interior panels are allowed.

Modifications are allowed to certain interior cosmetic panels and components. Panels that are allowed to be modified are; kick panels, roof pillar trim pieces (A/B/C pillars), inside door panels, rear parcel shelf, console. Panels and interior vehicle components not listed here (such as the dashboard, seat rails, headliner) cannot be modified in any way other than the replacement or addition of a sound system component used for audio purposes. If you‘re unsure about a modification, contact the IASCA Office.

Aftermarket audio components can be mounted in any of the ―approved for modification‖ panels and components listed above (Example: speakers in kick pods) as long as they do not compromise the safety of the judge or impede the proper operation of any of the vehicle‘s safety features.

Any other additional aftermarket equipment used in the vehicle‘s sound system

(such as subwoofers, amplifiers, capacitors, processors, etc.) may be mounted anywhere in the vehicle, so long as the vehicle interior maintains an OEM factory ―look‖.

ï‚·All OEM vehicle functions (such as windows, door locks, sunroof, door handles, etc.) must maintain their functionality. Example: windows designed to roll up and down must be able to perform that function without interference.

ï‚·Sound enhancing materials used in the vehicle (such as sound damping) must not be visible or impede the proper fit of any vehicle panel.

ï‚·All OEM vehicle safety features in the interior of the vehicle which include, but are not limited to, airbags, emergency brake, seat belts, seat adjusting mechanisms, etc. must be intact, unmodified and fully operational. Convenience items such as the spare tire and jack may be removed.

ï‚·There are no limitations to the type and amount of audio equipment used in Amateur Class, so long as they meet all other requirements for the Class.

52

6.3 - PRO/AM CLASS

6.3.1 - Intent

The intent of the Pro/Am Class is to provide a progression from the Amateur Class for more experienced competitors, with a higher level of modifications to the vehicle and audio system. Systems are evaluated by 1 judge.

6.3.2 - Competitor Requirements for Pro/Am Class

The Class is open to all industry and non-industry related IASCA competitors of Sound Quality competition (either working in the industry or sponsored by an industry member) who‘s vehicles meet the requirements for the class.

ï‚·Competitors with other organizations who possess a high level of skill and experience in Sound Quality competition may be reclassified to this Class or a higher Class.

6.3.3 - Vehicle/System Requirements for Pro/Am Class

ï‚·Modifications to any or all interior cosmetic panels or components are allowed, however the vehicle must retain all standard seating positions

ï‚·All OEM vehicle functions (such as windows, door locks, sunroof, door handles, etc.) must maintain their functionality.

ï‚·Aftermarket items such as cell phone holders, iPod docks and their attachment cables are allowed within the boundaries of the vehicle interior.

All OEM vehicle safety features in the interior of the vehicle which include, but are not limited to, airbags, emergency brake, seat belts, etc. must be intact, unmodified and fully operational, forward of the vehicle‘s B pillar. Exception: seat adjusting mechanisms (seat rails) modified to allow for extended travel of the front seats to improve sound quality are allowed.

ï‚·Convenience items such as the spare tire and jack may be removed.

Aftermarket audio components can be mounted in any of the interior panels and components, as long as they do not compromise the safety of the Judge or impede the proper operation of any of the vehicle‘s safety features.

ï‚·There are no limitations to the type and amount of audio equipment used in Pro/Am Class.

6.4 - PRO AND ULTIMATE CLASSES

6.4.1 - Intent

The intent of the Pro and Ultimate Classes are to provide a progression from the Amateur and Pro/Am Classes for more experienced competitors, with a higher level of modifications to the vehicle.

6.4.2 - Competitor Requirements for Pro and Ultimate Classes

Competitor Requirements are the same as the Pro/Am Class

6.4.3 - Vehicle/System Requirements for Pro and Ultimate Classes

Same as the Pro/Am Class but with the following exceptions;

ï‚·Only the front seating positions need to be maintained

OEM vehicle safety features may be removed or disabled, as long as they do not compromise the safety of the Judge or their ability to evaluate the vehicle‘s sound system.

53

6.5 - EXPERT CLASS

6.5.1 - Intent

The intent of the Expert Class is to offer a competition class for the most highly experienced competitors with vehicles that have extensive modifications beyond the criteria for the lower classes. Modifications to the vehicle are done specifically to increase the performance of the audio system at the highest level from both front seat positions.

6.5.2 - Competitor Requirements for Pro Class

Open to all competitors; there are no minimum requirements for this class.

6.5.3 - Vehicle/System Requirements for Pro Class

ï‚·Modifications to interior cosmetic panels or components are allowed, however the vehicle must retain both standard automotive front seating positions.

OEM vehicle functions (such as windows, door locks, sunroof, door handles, etc.) may be disabled or modified, as long as they do not compromise the safety of the judge or their ability to evaluate the vehicle‘s sound system.

OEM vehicle safety features may be disabled, as long as they do not compromise the safety of the judge or their ability to evaluate the vehicle‘s sound system.

Aftermarket audio components can be mounted anywhere in the vehicle, as long as they do not compromise the safety of the judge or their ability to evaluate the vehicle‘s sound system.

ï‚·There are no limitations to the type and amount of audio equipment used in Expert Class, so long as they meet all other Vehicle/System Requirements for the Class.

6.6 - EXPERT SOLO CLASS

6.6.1 - Intent

The intent of the Expert Solo Class is to offer a competition arena for the most highly experienced competitors with vehicles that have extensive modifications beyond the criteria for the lower classes. Modifications to the vehicle are done specifically to create the ideal listening experience from a single seating position in the vehicle.

6.6.2 - Competitor Requirements for Pro Class

Open to all competitors; there are no minimum requirements for this class.

6.6.3 - Vehicle/System Requirements for Pro Class

Vehicle/System Requirements in Expert Solo are the same as Expert, but with the following exceptions:

Seating positions may be modified to optimize the listening area for the listener. Any modification of seats or seating position must not compromise the safety of the judge or their ability to evaluate the vehicle‘s sound system.

ï‚·Vehicles allowed to compete in the Expert Solo Division must be motorized vehicles such as cars, trucks, vans, SUVs, COVs, designed and built by the manufacturer for the purpose of being driven on the road by the general public.

ï‚·Vehicles such as trailers, motorhomes, golf carts, motorcycles, etc. are not eligible to compete.

If a you are unsure whether your vehicle qualifies, contact the IASCA Head Office for clarification.

54

7 - JUDGING PROCEDURE

7.1 - PRIOR TO EVALUATION

1.The Judge will introduce themselves to the competitor prior to beginning the evaluation.

2.The Judge will ask the competitor if they are ready for their installation judging. If the answer is yes, the judge will ask the competitor to begin their presentation. Judge is not allowed to evaluate the system and vehicle until the competitor gives approval that the vehicle is ready to be judged.

3.If a judge has to return to a vehicle more than twice to ask the competitor if they are ready, the judge has the authority to penalize the competitor by deducting 10 points from the overall score for tardiness or delay of judging.

7.2 - DURING THE EVALUATION

1.During evaluation, the Judge will listen attentively to the competitor‘s presentation without interrupting. The Judge will withhold all questions until after the presentation is complete, unless the competitor asks a question of the Judge.

2.The vehicles and systems for all competitors will be evaluated with the engine off, unless circumstances dictate otherwise.

3.The Judge will use the competitor‘s photo log book and any lists they present, along with the vehicle itself, to complete the evaluation. This will require that they may need to move around the vehicle to inspect it during evaluation, so it is recommended that the competitors leave enough space around the vehicle so the judge may move freely and allow access to any area of the vehicle the judge requests to see.

4.The Judge will evaluate the vehicle in the order of the score sheet, starting with Membership, Presentation, System Safety, Installation Integrity, Cosmetic Integration, Craftsmanship and Creative Elements.

5.Once the Judge has completed the evaluation, they will exit the vehicle and thank the competitor.

8 - Membership (8 Points Total available)

8.1 - IASCA LOGO ON DISPLAY 0 or 3 points

Three (3) points are awarded for displaying the IASCA sound waves logo (see logo at the end of this section) on the exterior of the vehicle. By definition, the exterior of the vehicle is described as; being able to view the logo from a standing position with

all the doors, the hood (bonnet) and

trunk (boot) closed. The logo does not have to

be permanently affixed to qualify.

 

8.2 - IASCA MEMBERSHIP

0 or 5 points

Five (5) points are awarded for being a card carrying IASCA member in good standing. Competitors must present their current IASCA Membership Card to the IQC Judge during their presentation; it is not the responsibility of the Judge to ask for it.

An IASCA competitor membership may be purchased the day of the event, however, it must be purchased PRIOR TO entering the judging lane. New IASCA membership credentials (as in a receipt of payment) must be properly authorized and presented to the Judge. (See note on next page)

55

NOTE: The Head Judge or promoter reserves the right to award these points to any new member on the day of the event should the IASCA Membership kit shipped from Headquarters has not yet been received by the competitor. If the competitor has a copy of their order confirmation from IASCA, the Judges will award the competitor their points, but only for that event; the competitor must present their membership card at the next event in order to earn these points.

9 - Presentation (55 Points total available)

The following rules apply to the judging of Presentation:

ï‚·All competitors are required to explain their sound system and installation to the Judge in the form of a verbal presentation.

The Competitor Member (vehicle owner) must present their vehicle. If for any reason (language barrier, physical injury, illness, etc.) a competitor requests that their co-pilot or another representative presents their vehicle in their place while they are present, the judge may, at their discretion, approve the competitor‘s request. However, if the competitor is present and capable of conducting the presentation, but still chooses to have their co-pilot or representative present their vehicle, they will only receive a score of 1 point in System Knowledge.

ï‚·If the owner of a vehicle is disabled or physically challenged in a manner which would make it difficult for them to give the presentation, a second person may be called in to assist. The owner of the vehicle still must be present and participate in the presentation to the best of their ability. System Presentation and System Knowledge will be scored normally in this instance.

ï‚·The presentation may include, but shall not be limited to or required to have, photo logs, videotape, schematic drawings, or any other form of documentation. After the presentation, the competitor will be directed to a designated waiting area. Competitors may use computers that have been integrated into the vehicle for their system presentation. The competitor cannot require the Judges to wear any devices during the presentation. (i.e. headphones, 3D glasses, goggles, helmets, hula skirts, etc.)

ï‚·The contestant must not leave the waiting area until the vehicle evaluation is complete. The competitor will not converse with any official judging at the event during evaluation, unless requested by the Judge to answer a question or to clarify a system element.

ï‚·If weather conditions are poor (rain, snow, sandstorm or dust due to field conditions etc.), these conditions will be taken into consideration during the competition by the Judge.

ï‚·A competitor is required to show all areas of their vehicle to the Judge during the presentation, even if said compartment contains no equipment related to the audio system. (i.e. a covered truck bed that contains no audio equipment.) If a competitor refuses to show any or all compartments, the Judge is authorized to deduct 2 (two) points per compartment in Presentation scoring.

Judges will evaluate the presenter‘s presentation and explanation for Creative

Element and installation requirements within the presentation display. Elements of the installation or presentation that are of a high level of quality, difficult to accomplish, or require a significant amount of preparation will be considered in judging for the degree of difficulty in the execution of each element.

56

9.1 - System Presentation

1 to 10 points

The competitor will be given a specific amount of time to describe their vehicle and system and point out any special elements of the vehicle‘s mobile electronics installation, such as hidden components, installation techniques, special efforts in system Creative Elements, operation of the system, precautions, etc. - that may affect the judging. The Judge will not interrupt the presenter during this time.

It is the presenter’s responsibility to keep the presentation within the time allotted.

Judges will politely inform competitors when the presentation will begin and when the time has expired. If the presentation goes over the allotted time, the Judge may deduct up to 3 points for the extended time, based on the amount of time over.

Allotted Time for Presentation by Class

Rookie

5 minutes

Amateur

7 minutes

Pro/Am

7 minutes

Pro and Ultimate

10 minutes

Expert/Expert Solo

15 minutes

9.2 - System Knowledge

1 to 10 points

In this scoring section, the Judge will evaluate how well the competitor knows the vehicle‘s audio system. The score will be determined by the competitor’s knowledge of their system during the presentation and may include questioning the competitor after the presentation is over, during the judging process.

9.3 - Photo Log Book

1 to 10 points

Points are awarded based on the level of detail shown in the photos relative to the installation of the system and the judging sections on the score sheet, as well as the organization of the photo log book for easy reference when judges are scoring. It‘s recommended to have the photos organized in such a way that they follow the scoring sections of the score sheet.

9.4 - Overall Theme

1 to 10 points

Scoring is based on how well the competitor was able to create a common theme/display with their vehicle, system, installation and display. The theme can have variations of ―stock‖ and ―custom‖ attributes, as long as the overall theme (or concept) is maintained. Maximum points can be earned if theme extends beyond vehicle.

9.5 - Attention to Detail/Cleanliness

1 to 10 points

The vehicle, system and display area should be clean and presentable at all times during the competition. Cleanliness, as well as the attention to detail of the entire vehicle and surrounding area will be evaluated. Damage to interior trim panels will be taken into consideration. The Judge will check all vehicle compartments and the display area for dirt, trash, fingerprints, dust, etc.

NOTE: The Judge will also take into consideration the type of vehicle that is being evaluated. Vehicles used as ―daily drivers‖ will typically have a level of ―road rash‖ in the paint, or signs of normal wear and tear. These items will not affect the scoring for

―daily driver‖ vehicles, however show cars and ―trailer queens‖ will be held under the highest scrutiny.

A Judge will not penalize a competitor for the average condition of the vehicle or for damage resulting from an obvious vehicle accident.

57

9.6 - Security System

0 to 5 points

Points are awarded based on the type of security system, features and proper operation of the system and its features. If the vehicle does not have any form of security system, points cannot be awarded in this section. Points are awarded as follows:

0 points for - no system at all, or a non functional system, OR 1 point for - an OEM or aftermarket Keyless Entry System OR 2 points for - an Aftermarket or OEM Alarm/Security system

0 to 3 additional bonus points for - any additional functions connected to the security system. 1 point per function will be awarded.

Note: A function on a security system is considered as the “complete cycle” of that function (e.g. Windows roll up and down).

Additional Bonus points may be awarded for, but not limited to, the following items:

Windows Up/Down

Door opening/closing control

 

 

Convertible top control

Door Locking control

 

 

Lighting Control

Motorization control

 

 

Trunk Release control

Processor Controls

 

 

10 - System Safety (40 Points Total available)

System Safety is broken down into 9 scoring areas. All scoring areas are judged to determine the relative safety of the sound system installation in the vehicle.

10.1 - BATTERIES VENTED & SECURED 0 or 5 Points Batteries connected to any charging system installed anywhere in a vehicle must be vented and securely mounted. All batteries installed in the trunk (boot) or passenger compartment of a vehicle must be contained in a sealed chamber with adequate ventilation (minimum ¼‖ inside diameter tube) to the exterior of the vehicle.

This is to prevent any potential build up of hydrogen gases during recharge conditions, whether from the vehicles charging system or an external battery charger. Batteries that have been upgraded or have had the cables upgraded must also comply with this rule.

EXCEPTION: Batteries that are considered ―sealed units‖ may be exempt from the sealed chamber section of this rule, if the competitor can provide proof that the battery does not emit any gases under charging conditions. This can be proven with an owner‘s manual for the battery stating that the battery is a sealed unit and does not emit gases during charging conditions. If the sealed unit battery manufacturer makes claim that the battery may produce gases if charging instructions are not followed, the Judge may verify that the charging system is within the guidelines of the battery specifications by checking the voltage of the charging system in use.

If a charging system fails to meet the sealed unit battery manufacturer‘s requirements for proper charging, points may not be awarded if the battery is not contained in a sealed chamber with adequate ventilation.

NOTE: All batteries that are in a sealed chamber must have photographic evidence of venting.

58

10.2 - SAFE TO OPERATE WHILE DRIVING

1 to 5 Points

In this section, Judges evaluate whether the system can be operated (Volume, track selection, power on/off) without unreasonable distraction from the road. If, in the Judge's opinion, the system cannot be operated safely while driving, low points will be awarded. The location and orientation of the above-mentioned controls and the status display of the system will be weighed by the Judges to determine if the system is safe to operate while driving. For example, a track display located between the bottom seat cushions of the front seats would be considered an unreasonable distraction. Furthermore, motorized installation elements must be designed so as not to interfere with the safe operation of the vehicle.

RULE Verification: The judge will ask the competitor to sit in the vehicle, in the normal driving position with the doors closed and both hands on the steering wheel. The competitor will then demonstrate the ability to operate and view the audio system controls. This demonstration will not be considered as part of the presentation time given to competitors.

10.3 - POWER WIRE SIZE

0 or 5 points

Proper wire size should be used for both positive and negative current requirements. There is no deduction or additional points awarded for wires bigger than the minimum size specified by the Power Cable Calculator Chart. If wire size does not meet requirements, points will not be awarded. (See Power Cable Calculator Chart on next page)

Example: A 4 gauge wire runs from the front battery to one 1000 watt amplifier in the trunk. How long can the wire be? A 1000 watt amplifier draws 1800 watts from the 12-volt source (based on a 60% amplifier efficiency rating). 1800 watts at 12-volts is a current draw of 150-amps. Therefore a 4 gauge wire passing 150-amps of current can be no longer than 12-feet. Current calculation formula: Amp Wattage times Efficiency, divided by voltage = current draw.

How to calculate required wire size for your system application:

1.Add up the total fuse ratings for each piece of equipment to be powered by the main power wire and calculate the total current required.

2.Measure the length of power wire needed

3.Locate the closest total amperage rating in the chart below and follow the column down to the closest wire length required, then cross reference to the wire gauge column on the left of the chart.

 

Wire Gauge

Maximum Recommended

 

Fuse Size

 

 

 

00 awg

400 amps

 

 

 

 

0 awg

325 amps

 

 

 

 

1 awg

250 amps

 

 

 

 

2 awg

200 amps

 

 

 

This chart shows the maximum

4 awg

125 amps

 

 

6 awg

80 amps

recommended fuse sizes for the wire gauge

 

 

listed, based on a wire length of 15 feet.

8 awg

50 amps

 

 

 

 

Source www.bcae1.com

10 awg

30 amps

 

 

 

12 awg

20 amps

 

 

 

 

14 awg

15 amps

 

 

 

 

16 awg

7.5 amps

 

 

 

59

10.4 - APPROPRIATE POWER WIRES FUSED

0 or 5 points

All electronics throughout the audio system installation must be individually fused (a fuse that is in line with each (one) piece of electronic gear) with appropriate value fuses. Chassis-mounted fuses on electronic equipment satisfy this requirement. Competitors must present photographs of (or physical access to) fuses for in-dash equipment. All fuses must be readily accessible within 60 seconds and be able to be replaced within the five minute breakdown period. A Judge may request that this be demonstrated and will not award points if it cannot be done.

What is considered an “appropriate value fuse?” Factory recommended fuse ratings for equipment are the first point of reference; in order to comply with these ratings, proof from the manufacturer must be presented to the judge for verification or the fuses within the amplifier must be visible for judges to inspect.

NOTE: Judges will allow for a 20% over/under allowance in fuse rating. Protecting your equipment with a fuse value more than 20% below the recommended rating will not be considered as appropriate. If there is a fuse inline between the amplifier fuses and the main power/distribution connection, the lower value fuse/s of the two will be considered the primary fuse.

All system power wires connected to any positive battery post (or terminal) must be fused within 18 inches of wire length from the battery post (terminal) and prior to the power cable's first pass through any sheet metal or other conductive material. The term “wire length” indicates the complete wire, from tip to tip, inclusive of wire inside the fuse holder and battery terminal. If there is no fuse present or the fusing is located beyond 18 inches or 46 centimeters of wire length, or after the power wire passes through sheet metal, the score will be zero.

NOTE:

Banks of batteries located within 18 inches of wire length between each other may be evaluated as one battery and the wire between them need not be fused. Factory dual battery systems (usually found on larger diesel powered vehicles) often do not have factory-installed protection between batteries. - Additional protection is not required in these cases, unless the cable between the batteries has been upgraded.

Power

Cable

Calculator

Chart

60

10.5 - ALL WIRES PROPERLY PROTECTED

0 or 5 points

A non-conductive grommet must protect all wires where they pass through any metal panel* or against any metal edges. Additionally, a non-conductive protective sleeve (a wire‘s insulator is not considered as a protective sleeve) must protect all wires that pass along, by or against any potential hazardous metal. This includes, but is not limited to; all power wires, signal wires (e.g. RCA cables), speaker wires, security wires and convenience option wires. The grommet and sleeve must provide protection against elements common to the area in which it is installed. Any installed cabling mounted to the exterior of the vehicle, whether underneath or above, must be properly protected against exterior elements such as road debris (salt, sand, dirt, water, rocks, etc.) and must not be mounted (or hanging) below the chassis of the vehicle.

*Definition of a “pass through any metal panel ” - A ―pass through any metal panel ‖ in IASCA terms, is defined as a wire (power cable) travelling perpendicularly through any conductive material panel, with any edge of the conductive panel being less than one inch (1‖) away (along its complete circumference) from the edge of any wire or wire insulator. In order for the wire

(power cable) to be considered as not passing through a conductive material panel, there must be a minimum of one (1) inch (25mm) of distance between the outer edge of the passing cable/s (along its complete circumference) to any edge of the conductive material panel.

Any wire (cable) passing through an opening in a conductive material panel, equal to or greater than specified and being considered as ―not passing through a sheet metal panel‖, must be supported by a non conductive material in order to maintain the minimum required distance between the wire (power cable) and the conductive material panel (see diagram below).

SPECIAL NOTE: Competitors using pass through connectors that are commercially manufactured, and approved by any major safety standards organizations* for completing a circuit through a conductive material panel are exempt from the minimum “non conductive” material distance rule. However, competitors manufacturing their own wiring pass through, whether it be a grommet or pass through connector, must adhere to the rule. If using a commercially manufactured pass through connector approved by a major safety standards organization, it is the competitor’s responsibility to prove to the judge that it is an approved connector.

*Indicates such groups as DOT, UL, CSA, European Safety Standards such as CE or BG, Automotive Groups such as ASE, F1, NASCAR, NHRA, etc.

61

The following is an example of what is not considered a

“Pass Through any

Metal (or Conductive) panel‖:

The following is an example of what is considered a “Pass

Through any Metal (or

Conductive) panel”:

10.6 - ALL WIRES PROPERLY TERMINATED

1 to 5 points

All connections of wires at terminations and both positive and negative terminals must be protected from potential shorting and corrosion. All wire conductors (copper, etc.) must be insulated and not exposed. All Terminations and Terminals must be accessible by the Judges; failure in this will result in a lower score being given.

NOTE: ―Properly Terminated‖ refers to how well a wire is inserted into a terminal on, or attached to, a piece of equipment. It does not refer to the type of terminal used by the competitor when making the connection, or to the manufacturer when building a piece of equipment. This means that no matter what type of terminal is used, there should not be any loose strands of bare wire or metal protruding (or visible) from the terminal or the connection that could potentially touch on (or be touched by) a conductive surface causing a short circuit and, that the terminal and where it connects is properly protected from corrosion.

The following examples satisfy this requirement:

Terminals:

ï‚·Terminals that are coated or plated

A complete or partially sealed enclosure surrounding the terminal (battery venting or ―vents‖ that allow gases to escape from the enclosure are acceptable).

ï‚·A non-conductive water proof grease covering the termination

62

Wire Termination:

ï‚·A heat shrinkable material that provides protection against fluid penetration

ï‚·A non-conductive water proof grease covering the exposed wire (Waterproof grease should be used to stop corrosion penetrating up the cable.)

10.7 - INTERIOR WIRES HIDDEN FROM VIEW

0 or 5 points

Any wires in the passenger compartment that are not part of a visual display should be hidden from view while sitting upright in any seat of the vehicle or standing upright outside of the vehicle.

10.8 - WIRES SECURED

1 to 5 points

All wires should be neatly tied down at regular intervals (maximum 8 inches apart) and routed in a neat and orderly fashion so as to prevent them from interfering with the mechanics of the location in which they are installed. Any type of tape or glue is an unacceptable means of securing wires in any area that is exposed to the elements.

11 - Installation Integrity (35 Points Total available)

In this section, Judges will evaluate the integrity of the system's installation. Aspects of the installation that the Judges will consider include: proper cooling and ventilation, reliability of the system , ease of access for service and safe system design.

Installation Integrity Scoring Scale

Perfect

10 points

 

 

 

Exceptional

8 - 9

points

 

 

 

Very Good

6 - 7

points

 

 

 

Good

4 - 5

points

 

 

Marginal

2 - 3 points

 

 

Needs Improvement

1 point

 

 

11.1 - SOURCE UNIT

1 to 10 points

Maximum points are scored by those units that are secured in a fashion that they have no detectable movement when evaluated. The Judge will evaluate how well the source unit is physically mounted in the vehicle; they will check for sufficient support and the fit and finish of the source unit and accompanying panels. The entire dash panel assembly and surrounding trim must fit together precisely. Points can be deducted for any of the following: loose mounting brackets, gaps or improper fit of any major panels around the source unit mounting area.

A source unit is defined as any piece of installed equipment that is capable of playing the official IASCA reference material available at an event, inclusive of Indash CD/DVD/MP3 players, single/multi disc CD changers, onboard PC or video game console, iPods, MP3, ZUNE or similar players capable of playing the media.

63

11.2 - AMPLIFIER/S

1 to 10 points

Amplifier/s must be solidly mounted in areas that promote ease of access, proper cooling/ventilation, ease of fuse access, ease of servicing and mounting location. Points will be awarded for amplifier mounting architecture that promotes a safe and logical location, easy access to amp fuses and controls and proper amplifier cooling capabilities. Amplifiers mounted in areas which inhibit cooling, improperly secured to the vehicle, mounted in such a way that promotes difficulty in accessing fuses or controls or may create a safety hazard could have points deducted.

11.3 - SPEAKERS

1 to 10 points

Speakers must be mounted using methods and locations that promote component longevity, system reliability, safety and proper acoustical performance. In this section, Judges will evaluate the installation integrity of all speakers. The entire speaker system must be well secured to the respective mounting surfaces (the mounting surface may be a door panel, rear deck, speaker enclosure, etc.), exhibit reinforced surfaces or well executed enclosures, use the correct mounting hardware, be located in safe and logical locations of the vehicle, and use the proper speaker protection appropriate for the particular installation.

Proper speaker protection will be determined using a 1” (25mm) diameter object; if the judge is able to pass that object through the speaker protection at any point, and touch the cone of the speaker, it will not be considered as properly protected. Points are to be awarded based upon all speakers being readily accessible by the Judge; if some speakers cannot be accessed, photographs of those speakers must be presented. The overall score will reflect the installation integrity of the speakers that are accessible and the photos presented.

11.4 - OTHER DEVICES

0 to 10 points

Maximum points are scored by those devices that are secured in a fashion that promote component longevity, system reliability, ease of fuse access and ease of replacement or servicing. In this section, Judges will evaluate the installation integrity of any audio system component not covered by a previous category. This includes pre-amps, equalizers, electronic and passive crossovers, DSP processors, center channel devices, surround sound processors, noise gates, bass reconstruction processors, line drivers, OEM Integration components and any other device through which the audio signal will pass once it leaves a source unit connected to the system, until it reaches the speaker. When multiple devices (as defined above) are present in one vehicle, the Judges will assign a score based on the least well-installed unit. In the case of multiple source units, the units not judged under the Source Unit Judging will be judged here.

If there are no other pieces of equipment connected to the vehicle‘s sound system that can be considered as ―Other Devices‖, the score for this section will be zero (0).

64

12 - Cosmetic Integration (35 Points Total available)

In this section, Judges will evaluate how well the system components are cosmetically integrated into the vehicle and overall installation theme. Items for consideration are ease of operation, safety, as well as the fit and finish of the installation.

Cosmetic Integration Scoring Scale

Perfect

10 points

 

 

 

Exceptional

8 - 9

points

 

 

 

Very Good

6 - 7

points

 

 

 

Good

4 - 5

points

 

 

Marginal

2 - 3 points

 

 

Needs Improvement

1 point

 

 

 

There are two methods of cosmetic integration, STOCK and CUSTOM. Each method of cosmetic integration has the potential to score the same amount of points:

1.It is acceptable and often times desirable to combine methods of cosmetic integration. Example: Having a Stock interior which promotes added security, combined with a Custom trunk area that highlights that equipment mounted in that space and promotes the ―show‖ aspect of the contest.

2.During their presentation, a competitor must inform the Judge what the design directive is (Stock or Custom) for each compartment of the vehicle (Engine, Passenger, Rear). Example: Interior is Stock, Rear Compartment is Custom.

3.A STOCK installation maintains the integrity of the vehicle‘s interior with continuity. Color and texture are important. The highest points are awarded to the installation that creatively expands upon the factory look. The main motivating factor behind an installation in the STOCK method is to make it look the way the factory would do it, or better.

4.A CUSTOM installation is one that purposely highlights the installation and its components. Consistency in the methods of highlighting, color selection, blending and creative methods of integration, will be important points of concern. This type of installation lends itself to the outlandish, much in the way a street rod stretches the limit of an OEM factory vehicle. The main motivating factor behind an installation in the CUSTOM method is to make it stand out in the installation.

5.As this scoring section focuses on how well the system components are cosmetically integrated into the vehicle and the overall installation theme, scoring will be focused on how well this was done in the installation and not what method of installation it is. Stock and Custom installation methods will be scored on the same scale, with no preference of one method over another.

Cosmetic Integration will be scored on:

ï‚·

Source Unit

1 to 10 points

ï‚·

Amplifier/s

1 to 10 points

ï‚·

Speakers

1 to 10 points

ï‚·

Other Devices

0 to 10 points (If no Other Devices present = 0)

65

13 - Craftsmanship (45 Points Total available)

In this section, Judges will evaluate the quality of workmanship and elements of the installation that contribute to reliability, longevity, and durability of the audio/video system, as well as the overall fit and finish of the installation. The degree of difficulty involved with the various elements of an installation will be considered along with use of exotic materials, fasteners and/or installation techniques.

Judges Evaluate Craftsmanship by the Following Scale

 

Perfect

 

10 points

 

 

 

 

 

Very Good/Excellent

 

8-9 points

 

 

 

 

 

Above Average/Good

 

6-7 points

 

 

 

 

 

Adequate/Average

 

2-5 points

 

 

 

 

 

Needs improvement

 

1 point

 

 

CRAFTSMANSHIP SECTIONS AND POINT TOTALS

ï‚·

Wiring

1 to 10 points

ï‚·

Source Unit

1 to 10 points

ï‚·

Amplifier/s

1 to 10 points

ï‚·

Speakers

1 to 10 points

ï‚·

Other Devices

0 to 10 points

66

14 - Creative Elements (Points Total available based on Class)

The concept of the Creative Elements scoring section is to reward those competitors for the “creative elements” within their installation that take it to the next level and raise the standard of installation in our industry.

Creative Elements points are designed to reward the competitor for going ―over and above‖ a standard installation in a vehicle, using different items or techniques in the build, design and installation of the audio/video system.

They are items or techniques within the design, build or installation of the audio/ video system that contribute to the system‘s performance, safety, cosmetics or serviceability. They are items that may also highlight the equipment, installation, design or build of the system in the vehicle.

In this section, points are awarded not only for the item or technique, but also to the installer for their ingenuity and “thinking outside the box”, attempting to raise the standards of installation quality.

These items or techniques do not necessarily have to be unique, or uniquely creative or innovative in nature, to earn points; they may be items or techniques that have been ―done before‖ and still earn points based on their level of ingenuity, difficulty, integration and craftsmanship.

All items or techniques to be considered for Creative Elements points should be presented to the IQC judge by the competitor in the form of a written list. Judges will also look for Creative Elements within the installation as they perform the evaluation and will award points for items that they see, whether there is a list or not. However, it is in the competitor‘s best interest to present a list, as the judge may not be aware of all the intricate details of the installation.

If a competitor chooses not to present a list to the judge, the judge will evaluate only the items they consider to meet the criteria. It‘s likely that a competitor will not score as many Creative Elements points without a list, as the judges will not be as familiar with the installation as the competitor is.

Photos are not required with the list; however photos of the Creative Elements to be considered could be included within the competitor photo log or in a separate section of the photo log book, for review by the judge if necessary.

Each item or technique will be scored on a 6 point scale per item, based on the factors listed below. Points are calculated in two areas:

ï‚·The level of ingenuity, uniqueness, creativity or innovation (0 to 3 points)

ï‚·The level of difficulty to accomplish and execute (0 to 3 points)

Creative Elements points possible (Per Class)

 

 

 

Class

Points Possible

 

 

Rookie

30

 

 

Amateur

60

 

 

Pro/Am

90

 

 

Pro

120

 

 

Ultimate

150

 

 

Expert/Expert Solo

180

 

 

67

EXAMPLE of CREATIVE ELEMENTS SCORING:

Competitor A builds a subwoofer enclosure out of wood and on one side of the enclosure incorporates a clear Plexiglas panel, as a window to display the subwoofers and integrate them into the theme of the installation. This allows viewing of the subwoofer from the cargo area of the vehicle and creates a display in the trunk incorporating the subwoofer.

Competitor B builds a similar enclosure with the same concept in mind, but builds the complete enclosure out of Plexiglas, then adds mirrored Plexi in with lighting to highlight the subwoofer. Then, Competitor B has the subwoofer basket chromed for effect.

While both subwoofer enclosures effectively operate at the same performance level and were designed with the same basic concept in mind, the execution of Competitor B‘s subwoofer enclosure achieved a superior cosmetic effect. Competitor B‘s enclosure also required a higher level of ingenuity and design to create, and assembling the enclosure was more difficult to accomplish and execute.

When judging these two enclosures in this example, a judge could award points in this fashion:

Competitor A

ï‚·The level of ingenuity, uniqueness , innovation or creativity - 1 point

The level of difficulty to accomplish and execute – 0 points

Competitor B

ï‚·The level of ingenuity, uniqueness , innovation or creativity - 2 points

The level of difficulty to accomplish and execute – 2 points

Both enclosures are worthy of points, but the level of execution, design, ingenuity and cosmetics in Competitor B‘s enclosure was superior, which merited the additional points awarded.

Keep in mind that this scenario is merely one example of a concept that could potentially earn Creative Elements points. It is only listed as a frame of reference and does not specify that those exact points would be awarded in a similar situation.

If a competitor feels that they were not awarded points fairly for a Creative Elements item they believe to meet any of the criteria listed, they may appeal the score to the IASCA Rules and Ethics Committee for review. If a decision is made in the competitor’s favor, they will be awarded the points appealed for and will earn the position the score change may have placed them in, plus CAP points for any position change. The final placement at the event in regards to award presentation however, will not be changed.

68

Section 5

69

RTA/SPL CHALLENGE

The IASCA RTA/SPL Challenge is a competition to show how well a sound system performs across all frequency ranges through the sound spectrum, as well as at higher output levels .

The RTA/SPL Challenge has two distinct sections; ―RTA‖, which is the measurement of the full frequency range and at what level each frequency is being reproduced, and ―SPL‖, which is the measurement of how many decibels the system is capable of achieving.

The RTA portion of the evaluation is an interactive format with the competitor and the Judge; in lower Classes, the judge will operate the meter and in higher Classes, the competitor operates the meter.

The SPL section of the challenge is done with music only; no test tones, sweeps or bass bombs and the measurement is taken using full range sound. Competitors choose their own music from any CD (must be approved by the Judge; music with lewd lyrics or foul language is not permitted) and play the track for 30 seconds to achieve their highest peak SPL reading, up to a maximum cap of 135 dB.

Once both sections of judging are completed, the scores from the SPL level and the RTA curve of the system are then combined for an overall system performance score, determining the winner.

All judging is done with the Official IASCA meter. Both RTA and SPL judging is performed from the driver‘s seat of the vehicle, allowing the microphone to emulate the driver‘s listening position. The microphone is positioned approximately 26 inches above the base of the seat on a stand, parallel (level) with the ground.

SPECIFICS OF RTA/SPL Challenge TESTING

All vehicles competing in the RTA/SPL Challenge will be RTA tested at a reference level of 90 decibels, using the pink noise track from the Official IASCA Sound Quality Reference CD. If a system is not able to achieve the 90dB reference level, it will be evaluated at the highest possible decibel level under 90dB that it can achieve.

If, for any reason, the noise floor at an event doesn‘t allow for proper RTA testing at the 90dB reference level, the level will be increased in 5dB increments until the testing is able to overcome any excessive noise at the event. If the floor noise is so excessive that it cannot be overcome (greater than 110dB) , the Challenge will be limited to strictly the SPL run only.

In the Rookie and Amateur Classes of RTA testing, the Judge will operate the meter, teaching the competitor how the system works. The Judge will make recommendations as testing proceeds, instructing the competitor when it‘s best to ―lock in‖ the score. In the Pro/Am and higher Classes (Pro, Ultimate, Expert, Expert

Solo), the competitor will be the person operating the meter while the judge supervises.

The SPL portion of testing will be measured at a ―peak‖ SPL reading over 30 seconds. The cap is 135 dB; any system achieving a decibel level of 135 dB or greater will score the maximum 35 points.

Competitors do not have to keep their system operating for the full 30 seconds if they choose not to; once the maximum level has been achieved, they may shut the system down so as not to cause damage.

70

RTA/SPL Challenge Judging Procedure

The competitor must be completely prepared for the evaluation once they enter the RTA/SPL Challenge area; there is no “set up time” once the vehicle has entered the area. Competitors may not, at any time, physically remove, replace or add any components to their sound system, including but not limited to, amplifiers, speakers, subwoofers, equalizers, processors, crossovers and source units, once they have entered the RTA/SPL Challenge judging area.

ï‚·Once in the judging lane, seat positions must remain as they were prior to the vehicle entering the lane (seat travel, seat recliners, etc.) for RTA/SPL testing. The only allowable adjustment to the vehicle and/or system for RTA/SPL during testing is the volume control setting.

The Judge will then position the stand with the microphone on the base of the driver‘s seat and adjust the microphone to be level with the ground. The stand will position the microphone at approximately 26 inches above the base of the seat, simulating the approximate height of the driver‘s ears. The competitor may supervise this procedure if they choose to. If the competitor is not happy with the microphone positioning and they wish for it to be adjusted, they may request this once.

ï‚·The Judge will then give the competitor the CD to be used for RTA testing. The competitor will then insert it into their CD player and go to the track to be used.

ï‚·The Judge will initially set the meter in the SPL mode and ask the competitor to adjust the volume until a reference level of 90dB is achieved.

ï‚·Once set, the competitor will set their CD player to repeat the track, exit the vehicle and join the judge at the meter.

ï‚·The testing will be performed as stated (depending on the Class) and the result will be recorded.

ï‚·Once RTA testing is completed, competitors have two (2) minutes to make any adjustments to their vehicle or system before being measured for SPL. Competitors must be ready for SPL judging when the Judge indicates that their two minute preparation time is over.

ï‚·The competitor will then show the CD to be used to the Judge for approval.

ï‚·The competitor will then insert the CD into the player and select the track to be played.

ï‚·Competitors not able to operate their system from outside may sit in the vehicle during SPL judging. If they choose to do so, they must sit in the passenger seat and they must wear proper hearing protection. If the system is able to be operated from outside the vehicle, IASCA highly recommends that they do so.

ï‚·All vehicle openings and panels (e.g. windows, doors, sunroofs, trunk, hood, hatch, etc.) must be fully closed and remain that way until testing is completed. Any panel opened (or open) during testing will void the run and the competitor will receive a score of zero (0).

When ready, the competitor will give the Judge a signal that they are ready to compete. Once the judge receives the signal, they will begin the countdown and inform the competitor with a ―5-4-3-2-1‖ fingers to fist countdown.

When the Judge points at the competitor, the judging has started and will continue for 30 seconds. At 5 seconds before the end of the testing, the Judge will once again give the competitor a ―5-4-3-2-1‖ fingers to fist countdown, then a ―flat hand‖ wave, signifying the end of the testing .

ï‚·Once all testing is completed, the Judge will remove the microphone and stand from the vehicle and the competitor must immediately remove their vehicle from the RTA/SPL area.

71

RTA MICROPHONE STAND

RTA Microphone Height

26‖

72

Section 6

Multimedia

Judging

73

MULTIMEDIA JUDGING

IASCA‘s Multimedia format was designed to meet the increasing demand from competitors worldwide. As Multimedia is becoming more popular, its inception is geared to help stimulate sales of 12 volt multimedia equipment even further.

The goal is to show the public what lengths can be achieved with multimedia in an automotive application. Display and presentation play an important role in the judging process.

The Following Procedures are Applied in All Classes.

1.The Competitor will notify the judge of the proper seat (must be a standard OEM seating position) to sit in and the proper screen to view for evaluation (if the multimedia system consists of multiple screens). If the system contains multiple screens, only the appointed screen will be used to evaluate the sound judging section; all screens will be evaluated in the Video and Installation sections.

2.For vehicles with multiple source units and volume controls, the competitor must specify which one (1) source unit and volume control should be used throughout the evaluation. The Judge will only adjust the volume control, track selection and control the main system power switch as designated by the competitor. This is to be indicated to the Judge at the beginning of the evaluation process. The Judge will mark which unit was used on the score sheet and it will also be judged as the main source unit in Installation judging.

3.During the judging process, the volume of the sound system will be set by the Judge according to the IASCA Judges‘ Training. Any track may be adjusted in volume at the Judge‘s discretion.

4.Judges will only use the designated tracks required to Judge each category on the Official IASCA Multimedia CD for judging Multimedia Sound Quality.

5.Competitors must prepare their vehicles for Multimedia Sound Quality testing prior to entering the judging lanes. Judges are not allowed to participate in this preparation process.

6.Judges are not allowed to enter the vehicle until ALL sound quality adjustments have been made and the competitor gives approval that the vehicle is ready to be judged. Once the vehicle is in the judging lane, it will be judged as presented; no other adjustments are allowed.

7.For purposes of clarification, the competitor must specify which seat the judge is to evaluate the multimedia system from. Should the competitor not specify which seat the system is to be judged from, the judge has the right to choose the seating location that best suits the judging process.

8.A competitor may elect to remove their speakers grilles for the purposes of judging sound quality. However, if a competitor elects to remove their speaker grilles, they must be removed prior to entering the judging lanes.

Once the competitor‘s vehicle has entered the judging lane, it will be judged as presented. If a competitor opts to remove their grilles for Multimedia Sound judging, they will be allowed to replace them for Multimedia Install judging.

74

9.A competitor may elect to cover the dash with a damping pad or cloth for the purposes of Multimedia sound quality judging.

10.A competitor may cover or block the front windshield with any device, blanket or cloth.

11.Gas, brake, or clutch pedals are not required to be within the reach of the sound quality Judges. Points will not be deducted by the Judges, including the judging of Ergonomics, if the Judges cannot reach these pedals.

12.A Sound Quality Judge is not allowed to change the position of the seat to judge the sound of the multimedia system, unless this position is deemed unreasonable or uncomfortable for the Judge. The Judge must involve the competitor when making any adjustments. It will be the decision of the Multimedia Sound Judge to determine if the seat positions are uncomfortable. Any seats that are reclined to more than a 45 degree angle may be considered unreasonable.

13.All doors, windows, hoods, trunks and any other panel in the vehicle, must be in their fully closed position for sound judging. Convertibles must be judged with the top up and locked in place.

14.Prior to the first vehicle being judged, the Head Judge shall inform the Judges and competitors whether vehicles will be judged for sound quality with the engine running or the engine off. This announcement should be made at the competitor and Judge‘s meeting. The Head Judge‘s decision will be based on weather (outdoor events) or ventilation considerations

(indoor events). It is within the Head Judge‘s discretion to make exceptions based on extenuating circumstances.

15.Highest scores will be awarded to multimedia systems that provide accurate and dynamic reproduction of the source material.

75

MULTIMEDIA SOUND JUDGING - ALL CLASSES 260 Points possible

TONAL ACCURACY All Classes—80 points possible

Competitor Point of Interest

This is an area of the score sheet where competitors should focus on receiving the maximum amount of points possible. Concentrate your tuning efforts on Tonal Accuracy . Then, once you have accomplished good Tonal Accuracy, adjust your system for Staging and Imaging.

In this section, Judges will evaluate the tonal characteristics of the multimedia system based on how well it reproduces the four frequency ranges;

Sub Bass, Mid Bass, Mid Range and High Frequencies.

Tonal Accuracy Scoring Scale

Perfect

20 points

 

 

 

Exceptional

16

- 19 points

 

 

 

Very Good

12

- 15 points

 

 

Good

8 - 11 points

 

 

 

Marginal

2

- 7 points

 

 

 

Needs Improvement

 

1 point

 

 

 

NO Zero Scores are Given

 

 

 

 

 

For a system to reproduce a recording with superior tonal accuracy, it must perform without significantly affecting the delicate parameters listed in the Sound Quality judging section (Loudness, Pitch, Timbre, Modulation, Duration, Attack and Decay - Section 4 of the rule book).

When all of the above parameters come together well, a system is said to sound natural and spectrally accurate. This is readily apparent to an experienced listener, who is processing thousands of sonic cues to form that opinion.

Judges will evaluate whether the sounds reproduced by the multimedia system sound real and natural in and of themselves. At this point, the Judges will concentrate specific sonic cues in each range.

SUB-BASS (1Hz-60Hz) All Classes

1 to 20 points

The Judge will concentrate on the lowest notes of the source material used. The sounds reproduced by the multimedia system in this frequency range should be immediately recognizable, articulate, free of distortion and should accurately coincide with the visual cues from the video screen. Accurate low-frequency extension is a desirable trait.

76

MID-BASS (60Hz-200Hz) All Classes

1 to 20 points

The Judge will focus on the sounds in this frequency range produced by the source material. These should be reproduced smoothly with good detail and proper attack and decay. Because of the small size of the vehicle as a listening area, problems with resonance are common in this frequency range.

MID-RANGE (200Hz-3KHz) All Classes

1 to 20 points

This range contains the vast majority of sonic information in most recordings. The Judge will focus mainly on the human voice in the source material. Resonance and sibilance are common system flaws in this frequency range. Voices should sound full and natural. All other sonic cues in this frequency range should sound realistic without sounding thin, dull or contain uncharacteristic ringing or distortion.

HIGH FREQUENCIES (3khz-+) All Classes

1 to 20 points

The Judge will concentrate on sonic cues within the source material such as cymbals, triangles, bells, etc. and the tendency to exaggerate "s" or "f", or "t" sounds in the voice recordings. These should sound accurate, smooth, neither too dull nor too bright and should not exhibit any harsh, thin, metallic sounds or distortion.

SOUND STAGE

All Classes - 45 points possible

 

 

 

 

The object of this section is to define the boundaries of the sound stage as they are reproduced by the vehicle’s multimedia system. The ideal multimedia system will create the illusion that the listener is “in the middle of the action”.

Sound Stage Scoring Scale for Width, Height and Depth

Sound stage exceeds vehicle boundaries (front and rear)

12

- 15 pts.

 

 

Sound stage originates at or near interior boundaries

9 - 11 pts.

 

 

 

Sound stage originates directly in front of listeners only

7

- 8 pts.

 

 

 

Sound stage is compressed and limited to directly at listener

5

- 6 pts.

 

 

 

Sound stage is impossible to define and does not create a realistic

1

- 4 pts.

effect

 

 

 

 

 

The sound stage produced by a multimedia system can be defined as the perceived space from which the sound originates (much like the stage in a concert hall is the space from which the sound originates.)

While judging the sound stage, the Judge will draw a stage map describing the sound stage boundaries for each seat.

This map will not only help in judging the sound stage elements, but will be vital to the evaluation of imaging (the placement of source elements within the sound stage).

Judges should not let any visual cues (apparent speaker locations or lack of them, for instance) influence their judgment. If distractions are making it hard to determine staging, Judges may close their eyes when judging the sound stage. Taking away the distractions and concentrating only on the sound generated by the multimedia system will help properly determine the staging characteristics of the system being judged.

77

STAGE WIDTH (left / right)

All Classes

1 to 15 points

Stage Width refers to the distance between the left and right boundaries of the sound stage. Better systems will create a wide sound stage for both listeners. Exceptional sound systems will have sound stages that seem to exceed the physical boundaries of the vehicle interior.

STAGE HEIGHT

 

All Classes

1 to 15 points

Stage height refers to the apparent height of the sound stage and the vertical spread above that level. The center of the vertical spread of the stage should be at horizon level with appropriate sonic cues being above or below this plane from left to right of the stage. The height of the stage should also remain horizontal from the front of the stage to the rear of the stage. This spread should not be exaggerated or incoherent and should be proportional to the other stage dimensions.

STAGE DEPTH

All Classes

1 to 15 points

Stage Depth is the illusion that some sonic cues are in front of others. Because the listener is, in essence, ―on‖ the stage (or as referred to earlier, in the middle of the action) in multimedia judging, stage depth also includes sonic cues from behind as well, with the illusion that some sonic cues are further behind the listener than others.

 

IMAGING

All Classes - 70 points possible

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Judges Use the Following Scale to Score Imaging

 

 

 

Images are correctly defined and located (Perfect)

 

10 points

 

 

 

 

 

Images are well defined and located, but not perfect (Excellent)

 

8-9 points

 

 

 

 

 

Images are somewhat diffused and shifted in location (good)

 

6-7 points

 

 

 

 

 

Images are diffused and somewhat difficult to place (average)

 

3-5 points

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image is very diffused and very difficult to locate

 

1-2 points

 

 

(below average)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The term “imaging” describes a system’s ability to reproduce the sonic elements of the source material in their correct locations and proportions on the sound stage. Correct locations are defined by their placement as they were actually recorded. Systems are judged based on their ability to place these elements accurately across the sound stage.

Judges will listen for and reward properly placed, coherent, and defined images that accurately convey the size and placement of the video elements relative to the soundstage. Particular attention should be paid to whether or not the sound of the elements are focused and properly placed in their correct location on the soundstage

(e.g. a helicopter flying overhead should sound like it‘s flying overhead, a police car with siren activated should sound like it‘s coming from the area relative to where it‘s located on the screen).

78

INTERFERENCES

All Classes - 5 points possible

 

 

 

 

A well executed installation, with a properly adjusted gain structure, should be free from noise at all listening levels. Noise is defined as any sound not present in the original source material, that has been added by either the vehicle’s electronics or audio system. This includes fans, relays, switching systems, etc...

Unlike “Absence of Noise” in traditional Sound Quality judging, Interferences are judged with the premise that the vehicle is not in motion and the engine is not running. Therefore, noises must emanate while the source material is being played for the system to receive deductions.

REALISM

All Classes - 60 points possible

 

 

 

 

LISTENING POSITION

 

 

All Classes

1 to 15 points

In Listening Position judging, a system is evaluated on the position of the listener relative to the stage surrounding them. The best systems will make the listener feel that they are ―in the middle of‖ or ―part of‖ the action. It will make the listener believe that they are directly involved with the action taking place. This is considered ideal as it approximates the experience of actually being there.

Listening Position Scoring Scale

Position is exactly (or almost exactly) where the listener is

 

 

supposed to be within the sound stage and emotes a realistic

12

- 15 pts.

 

feeling of being part of the action

 

 

 

 

 

Position gives an illusion that the listener is where they are

 

 

supposed to be within the sound stage and emotes a feeling of

9 - 11 pts.

 

being part of the action

 

 

 

 

 

Position is roughly where the listener is supposed to be, and

7

- 8 pts.

somewhat gives the feeling of being part of the action

 

 

 

 

 

Position is roughly where the listener is supposed to be but does

5

- 6 pts.

not give the feeling of being part of the action

 

 

 

 

 

Position is not where the listener is supposed to be and does not

1

- 4 pts.

 

emote a feeling of being part of the action

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DYNAMICS

 

 

 

All Classes

1 to 15 points

 

 

In Dynamics judging, a system is evaluated how well it is able to reproduce soft and strong passages within the source material as they were intended to be reproduced. It is also a test of the system‘s linearity and how clearly it can reproduce passages at low and high output levels. The best systems will reproduce soft passages with accuracy and clarity and louder passages without distorting, creating an emotional response for the viewer.

79

Dynamics Scoring Scale for Realism

System reproduces all sound passages with absolute clarity and

12 - 15 pts.

accuracy.

 

 

 

System reproduces all sound passages with good clarity and

9 - 11 pts.

accuracy

 

 

 

System reproduces all sound passages with reasonable clarity and

7 - 8 pts.

accuracy

 

 

 

Sound passages are heard, with only slight differences in softer and

5 - 6 pts.

louder passages

 

 

 

Sound passages are difficult to segregate, with no discernable

1 - 4 pts.

difference in output between softer and louder passages

 

 

 

AMBIENCE

All Classes 1 to 15 points

Ambience can be defined as the perceived space around a sound source. Most recordings contain ambient cues, which are either naturally created, created by recording engineers, or background noises that are part of the recording. These will interact with the acoustics of the vehicle and the design of the sound system to create a sense of space based on the source material used (e.g. rain falling or wind blowing in an outdoor scene).

Ambience Scoring Scale for Realism

System reproduces ambient cues with amazing clarity and detail

12

- 15 pts.

 

 

System reproduces ambient cues with very good clarity and detail

9 - 11 pts.

 

 

 

System reproduces ambient cues with good clarity and detail

7

- 8 pts.

 

 

 

System reproduces ambient cues with weak clarity and detail

5

- 6 pts.

 

 

 

System reproduces ambient cues with very little or no clarity and

1

- 4 pts.

detail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OVERALL MULTIMEDIA EFFECT

 

 

 

All Classes

1 to 15 points

 

 

The judge will evaluate the multimedia system on the overall effectiveness of the system in all scoring criteria from Tonal Accuracy, Sound Stage, Audio Imaging, Interferences and Realism, combined with the video aspect for a total multimedia experience.

NOTE: While a multimedia system may score well in some sound scoring areas, weaknesses in other areas or in the video aspect may cause the score to be lower in Overall Multimedia Effect.

80

MULTIMEDIA VIDEO JUDGING - ALL CLASSES 50 Points possible

PICTURE DETAIL/RESOLUTION

All Classes - 10 points possible

 

 

 

 

NOTE: The multimedia judge will evaluate the picture on all screens installed in the system for Picture Detail/Resolution, Picture Flow (Sampling) and Color Balance; Position to the screen and Viewing Angle will be valuated only on the main screen being used for judging.

Picture Detail/Resolution Scoring Scale

System reproduces picture with exceptional detail

9 - 10 pts.

 

 

System reproduces picture with excellent detail

7 - 8 pts.

 

 

System reproduces picture with very good detail

5 - 6 pts.

 

 

System reproduces picture with good detail

3 - 4 pts.

 

 

System reproduces picture with limited detail

1 - 2 pts.

 

 

Each area of evaluation determines the video screens‘ ability to accurately and realistically reproduce the source material.

The Judge will evaluate the picture quality of the screen related to detail, sharpness and resolution. Screens with a greater amount of detail (or higher lines of resolution) will be able to reproduce smaller items (background) so that they can be easily recognized.

PICTURE FLOW (SAMPLING)

All Classes - 10 points possible

 

 

 

 

The judge will evaluate the speed at which the screen can process the movement of the picture (flow rate) without blurring or fuzziness in the movements, using the source material.

Picture Flow (Sampling) Scoring Scale

Screen processes movements with accuracy and detail

9 - 10 pts.

 

 

Screen processes movements well, with slight blurring on some

7 - 8 pts.

items

 

 

 

Screen processes movements well, with blurring on some items

3 - 5 pts.

 

 

Screen processes movements poorly with blurring and picture

1 - 2 pts.

breakdown

 

 

 

81

 

COLOR BALANCE

All Classes - 10 points possible

 

 

 

 

The judge will evaluate the screen‘s capability to reproduce colors accurately and realistically using the source material. Color reproduction should be clear and natural looking, with no color bleeding, dullness or excessive brightness.

Color Balance Scoring Scale

 

Color is perfect (or near perfect) with no visible flaws

 

9 - 10 pts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Color is very good with only minor flaws

 

6 - 8 pts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Color is average with one possible major flaw

 

2 - 5 pts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Color is poor and unnatural

 

 

1 pt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

POSITION TO THE SCREEN

All Classes

- 10 points possible

 

 

 

 

 

 

This section is evaluated by the judge, from the seat assigned by the competitor.

The judge will determine if the seating position puts them ―in the middle of the action‖. Scoring will be relative to the judge‘s position to the screen and sound.

Position to the Screen Scoring Scale

 

 

Listener‘s seating position is perfectly centered to the screen and

10 pts.

 

 

 

sound

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Listener‘s seating position is slightly off but still maintains good

6 - 9 pts.

 

 

viewing angle and sound characteristics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Listener‘s seating position is off center and sound is slightly off

2 - 5 pts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Listener‘s seating position is way off center to both the screen and

1 pt.

 

 

sound and does not give an illusion of the multimedia experience

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VIEWING ANGLE

All Classes - 10 points possible

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this section, the judge will evaluate the screen‘s ability to accurately reproduce the picture clearly and accurately at varied viewing angles. The screen is judged from left to right up to 180 degrees; screens able to reproduce the picture accurately and clearly at that angle from both the left and right hand side will earn a perfect score. Scores will be based on how wide the viewing angle is before the picture starts to dissipate or

―ghost‖. This chart breaks down the scoring pattern for Viewing Angle:

 

Screen

9 to 10 pts

9 to 10 pts

6 to 8 pts

6 to 8 pts

3 to 5 pts

3 to 5 pts

 

 

1 to 2 pts

 

Viewing Angle

82

MULTIMEDIA INSTALLATION JUDGING ALL CLASSES 160 Points possible

IASCA Multimedia Installation judging follows the same concepts as traditional IASCA Sound Quality Installation judging; system safety, installation quality, integrity and craftsmanship are the key factors to the installation of any mobile electronics system into a vehicle.

Albeit not as detailed (in its evaluation) as in Sound Quality Installation judging,

IASCA‘s Multimedia Installation judging uses the same principles but combines them for an overall rating for each piece of equipment.

SYSTEM SAFETY

25 points possible

Battery/ies Vented/Secured - Batteries connected to any charging system, installed anywhere in the vehicle, that are not vented and secured to the vehicle will result in a score of zero in this section. Batteries installed in the trunk or passenger compartment of the vehicle, regardless of type, must be contained in a sealed chamber with adequate ventilation (minimum 1/4‖ diameter tube) to the exterior of the vehicle to prevent possible hydrogen gas build up during recharge conditions (batteries that have been upgraded or have had the cables upgraded must comply with this rule). Modifications made to factory battery locations may require additional mounting other than the factory mounting.

Point scoring range 0 or 5 points.

Power Wire Size - The main power wire from the battery/ies, used to power up the complete system, must be of appropriate size to meet the current demands of the complete system. To confirm the power wire size, the judge will use the power cable calculation chart on page INST-5 of the rule book. Point scoring range 0 or 5 points

Equipment and Power Wires Fused - Every component in the multimedia system must be individually and properly fused to meet the current demand of each component. All power wires must also be appropriately fused and the fuse holder must be located no further than 18 inches from the main system battery. The fuses used must be of the appropriate value to not only meet the demand, but to also protect the system and vehicle against any possible short circuits that would cause an excessive load on the power wires. Point Scoring Range 1 to 5 points.

Wires Secured, Protected & Terminated - All wiring for the multimedia system, from power wires to ground, signal and speaker wires, must be properly secured, protected and terminated to eliminate any possibilities of the wire being chaffed or cut, causing a possible short circuit. Additionally, a non-conductive protective sleeve

(a wire‘s insulator is not considered as a protective sleeve) must protect all wires that pass along, by or against any potentially hazardous metal. Split Loom tubing or

―Tekflex‖ loom are good examples of a protective sleeve. Additionally, any wires passing through a sheet metal panel must be protected using a non conductive grommet, to eliminate the possibility of the wire‘s protective sleeve and insulator being cut causing a short circuit. Point Scoring Range 1 to 5 points.

Ergonomic System Points - Points are earned in this section for the ease of operation of a system; the easier the system is to use, the higher the points. EXAMPLE: A multimedia system that is completely operated from one remote control from the seated position will earn higher points than a system that requires multiple remotes to operate, or a system that requires the user to move from the seated position to operate the system. Point Scoring Range 1 to 5 points.

83

INSTALLATION QUALITY AND INTEGRITY/CRAFTSMANSHIP

This section of the multimedia judging rules focuses on the areas of judging for each section, as opposed to the section itself, because every section has an Installation Quality and Integrity and a Craftsmanship judging area. Each section in Multimedia Installation Judging focuses on specific pieces of equipment in the multimedia system: Video Source Unit, Video Monitors, Amplifier/s, Speakers and Other Devices.

Installation Quality and Integrity focuses on how well the components were installed (fit and finish - Quality) and how solidly it was mounted (Integrity).

Craftsmanship focuses on the quality of work and elements of the installation that contribute to reliability, longevity and durability of the multimedia system. The degree of difficulty involved and the result achieved in accomplishing the various elements of an installation will be considered when evaluating Craftsmanship.

Point Scoring Range for Installation Quality & Integrity 1 to 10 points.

Point Scoring Range for Craftsmanship 1 to 10 points.

Special Note on Speaker Scoring

Scoring for speakers has an additional scoring area called ―Safe and Logical Location‖. Point Scoring Range for Safe and Logical Location in Speaker Judging 1 to 5 points.

Special Note on Other Devices

―Other Devices‖ refers to any component in the multimedia system between the source unit and the speakers or video screen that the audio or video signal passes through. Points are awarded based on the least well installed unit.

PRESENTATION AND DISPLAY

The judge will evaluate the competitor‘s knowledge and presentation of the vehicle and the multimedia system, as well as the vehicle and system display (for the spectators at the event).

System Presentation - Competitors will have 5 minutes in which to present their vehicle and multimedia system; this presentation time is for a verbal description of the vehicle and system in a ―walkaround‖ format. The competitor is required to physically show the judge the details of the system installation; video presentations or photos during presentation are not allowed. Point Scoring Range for System Presentation 1 to 5 points.

System Knowledge - The judge will evaluate how well the competitor knows their vehicle and multimedia system; they may offer a photo log book of the installation to the judge after the presentation is complete. Scoring will be determined by the competitor‘s knowledge of their vehicle and system during the System Presentation.

The judge may ask questions of the competitor to test their knowledge, which could reflect scoring in this section. Point Scoring Range for System Knowledge 1 to 5 points.

Vehicle Display - Competitors are urged to set up a display to show their vehicles to spectators at the event. Cars that are cleaned and presentable will earn higher points. Point Scoring Range for Vehicle Display 1 to 5 points.

Cleanliness - Competitors are urged to keep the exterior and interior of their vehicles clean and free of dirt and debris, making the vehicle and system more presentable. Clean, well maintained vehicles (exterior and interior) will earn higher points. Point Scoring Range for Passenger Compartment 1 to 5 points.

84

Section 9

Tuner Jam

85

TUNER JAM JUDGING FORMAT

The IASCA ―Tuner Jam‖ car show competition judging is based on a points scoring system. Tuner Jam is a flexible car show format that allows any coordinator, pro- moter, or retail shop the opportunity to custom design or tailor an event to their needs.

There are three (3) Divisions in the IASCA Tuner Jam format:

Rookie Division (Mild): The Rookie Division is for vehicles that have simple modifi- cations and have an enhanced factory look. This division allows the competitor to have upgrades like wheels, tires, vinyl stickers/graphics, short wing and simple ste- reo upgrades.

Street Division (Semi Wild): The Street Division is designed for vehicles with more modifications than a Rookie vehicle, but the vehicle is still used as a ―daily driver‖. It provides a fair and competitive format that levels out the playing field between daily driven vehicles and those with elaborate modifications. Point values in judging are increased from Rookie Division.

Ultimate Division (Wild): The Ultimate Division is designed for vehicles with exten- sive modifications in performance and appearance. The intent of the Ultimate Divi- sion is to provide a fair and competitive format that focuses on trailered vehicles, whether they be show cars or race cars. The Ultimate Division includes scoring on creativity and originality and the point values in each of the judging sections is in- creased from the Street Division.

IASCA Tuner Jam competition Divisions and Classes can be custom tailored to fit into any size event, large or small. It is at the discretion of the event coordinator or promoter to offer any Classes and Categories they wish after the Divisions. Competitors should always verify what Classes and Categories are being offered before traveling to events.

86

TUNER JAM CLASSES

Classes for an IASCA Tuner Jam event are unlimited. There are 4 different levels of Tuner Jam Events, based on the number of vehicles anticipated at the show. A small competition can be held with just three (3) Divisions; Rookie, Street and Ultimate. From a small event to a medium event you can add classes (American, Asian and European). For large events the classes can be broken down into specific catego- ries; Car, Truck (Full size), Mini Truck, SUV/Van and 2-3 wheelers (bikes/trikes). You can use the following chart to get a general idea of the different types of Classes that can be offered under the IASCA Tuner Jam competition format.

Classes at any IASCA sanctioned Tuner Jam event can be offered individually or combined together. The European, Asian, or American classes are determined by the vehicle manufacturer‘s country of origin.

Example 1: Honda - country of origin, Japan - class, Asian.

Example 2: Pontiac - country of origin, United States of America - class, American.

87

TUNER JAM DIVISION SCORING

IASCA MEMBERSHIP AND LOGO

All Divisions

0 or 5 points possible

IASCA Membership and Logo

0 or 5 points

A 5-point bonus is awarded for being a current IASCA member AND displaying an IASCA logo on the exterior of the vehicle. The logo does not have to be permanent to qualify. Memberships may be procured the day of the event but they must be purchased BEFORE entering the judging lanes. New IASCA membership credentials must be properly authorized and presented to the judge. The Head Judge re- serves the right to award these points to new members on the day of the event if IASCA Membership kits which includes the logos are unavailable.

EXTERIOR LOGOS & GRAPHIC DESIGNS

Rookie Division

1 to 5 points possible

Street Division

1 to 10 points possible

Ultimate Division

1 to 15 points possible

1.A logo is defined as any corporate identification emblem or design. A graphic is defined as a design of any sort which may or may not include a logo incorpo- rated in the design.

2.Logos and graphics can be either vinyl applications, or painted on the exterior of the vehicle.

3.The judges will award points within the appropriate scale for any logos and/or graphics that are applied or painted to the vehicle. The quality of the applica- tion; the style and difficulty of the design will earn maximum points. Painted graphics will be judged as to whether they are smooth and level with the paint surface and without imperfection. Vinyl graphics will be judged for application, peeling edges and/or air bubbles.

PRESENTATION & DISPLAY

PRESENTATION

Rookie Division

1 to 5 points possible

Street & Ultimate Division

1 to 10 points possible

Due to time constraints and the overall amount of entries for each competition, the Presentation judging portion of the event may be eliminated from the judging process. This decision is at the discretion of the coordinator or event promoter and will be announced at the competitor‘s meeting before each event.

1.A competitor is required to present all areas of their vehicle to the Judge. If a competitor refuses to allow a judge to examine a particular area, then points will be deducted from the overall score.

2.The competitor will have 5 (five) minutes of time (if offered as part of the judg- ing requirement) to present and point out any special elements of the vehicle‘s aftermarket installation – such as hidden components, installation techniques, special efforts in creativity, operation of the system, precautions, etc. - that may affect the judging.

3.The Judge will not interrupt the competitor however, it is the competitor‘s re- sponsibility to keep the presentation within the time allotted. Judges will politely inform competitors when the presentation will begin and when the time has expired.

88

4.The presentation may include, but shall not be limited to, photo logs, schematic drawings, or any other form of documentation.

5.Competitors may use computers that have been integrated into the vehicle for their system presentation. The competitor cannot require the Judge to wear any devices during the presentation. (i.e. headphones, goggles, helmets, hula skirts, etc.)

6.After the presentation is complete, the competitor will be directed to a desig- nated waiting area.

7.If weather conditions are poor (rain, snow, sandstorm or dust due to field condi- tions, etc.) consideration will be made by the Judge accordingly.

8.The competitor will not converse with any judging official at the event or during their evaluation, unless requested by the Judge to answer a question to clarify a system element.

9.Each competitor should make a system presentation to the Tuner Jam Judge. To receive maximum points each competitor should present an installation log/picture book.

10.ALL rules that govern the presentation scoring included in this rulebook shall

be enforced by the Head Judge. The Head Judge‘s decision is final.

11. The competitor must not leave the waiting area until the vehicle evalua- tion is complete.

Competitor Point of Interest:

Competitors should always attend the Competitor’s Meeting to find out exactly how the event rules will be judged and enforced. Weather, the amount of en- tries, time schedules and the amount of categories in each class will always have the possibility of changing before an event. This is something you should expect. Every competitor should understand and abide by the Com- petitor Guidelines & Responsibilities listed in this rulebook.

 

DISPLAY

Rookie Division

1 to 10 points possible

Street & Ultimate Division

1 to 15 points possible

1.The judges will be evaluating how well the competitor has displayed their vehi- cle during the event and the degree of difficulty when incorporating the vehicle theme into the display. Judges will award more points to a competitor‘s score for originality and having an information or display board letting the spectators know what kind of modifications have been done to the vehicle.

2.The display of previous awards (trophies and plaques) surrounding the vehicle will also earn more points. The use of props such as, external lights or strobe

lights, the use of neon, floor lighting and mirrors, mascots or similar items that fit within the vehicles theme will earn points. Any creative ideas or props that make the competitor‘s vehicle stand out from other competitors at the show can also earn points.

AUXILIARY LIGHTING

All Divisions 1 to 5 points possible

1.Vehicles will be judged on the variety of additional lighting elements including

external display lighting, neon and electroluminescence, OEM and Non OEM fixtures.

2. Judges will look for consistency or variations in theme and color. Maximum points will be awarded for lighting elements that enhance the display as well as the vehicle appearance.

3.A competitor may use any form or type of lighting such as, neon, strobe, display spots, etc.

89

EXTERIOR PAINT & BODY

In this section the judges will consider the overall appearance of the outside of the vehicle including; paint, suspension, undercarriage, wheels, tires, brakes and body modifications.

 

APPLICATION TYPE

Rookie Division

5 or 10 points possible

Street Division

10 or 20 points possible

Ultimate Division

15 or 30 points possible

Application Type refers to the materials used to create a vehicle‘s concept and/or theme. Some vehicles are custom painted while others utilize vinyl graphics to cre- ate the theme. Custom painting and/or airbrushing a vehicle requires greater effort and expense in the preparation and application than vinyl does, therefore vehicles with a custom paint scheme will earn more points than the same vehicle with a vinyl graphic applied.

If a vehicle has an OEM (Factory) paint scheme, with or without vinyl graphics, it will score in the lower point scale for that section. If a vehicle has a custom paint scheme (single or multiple color) with or without custom airbrushing, it will score in the higher point scale for that section.

EXTERIOR APPLICATION QUALITY

All Divisions 1 to 15 points possible

1.The judges will determine whether or not the paint (or graphics) matches and is smooth and even throughout the vehicle including the engine compartment, door jambs and other areas of the vehicle.

2.Paint should be free from scratches, buff marks, orange peel, masking marks or other imperfections that can be easily noticed. The Judge will inspect the vehi- cle to check for a smooth finish. Painted areas must match throughout the en- tire vehicle and be consistent in color.

3.Vinyl graphics applications should be smooth and free of air bubbles.

4.Vinyl graphics or ―wraps‖ should line up and not show any visible evidence of seams or imperfections.

 

EXTERIOR VEHICLE APPEARANCE

Rookie Division

1 to 5 points possible

Street Division

1 to 10 points possible

Ultimate Division

1 to 15 points possible

1.The judges will inspect the tires and rims including the lug nuts to determine proper mounting. Any and all accessories should follow the general theme of the vehicle including color, style and theft protection and should be clean from dirt and grease.

2.Tires should be clean and the rubber should be shiny (but not overly oily).

Judges will verify if the competitor has upgraded any brake accessories in- cluding rotors and brake pads as well as any aftermarket brake kit setup for the front and rear brakes. Any chrome or painted surfaces on the vehicle should be polished. The harder degree of difficulty will earn more points.

3.The undercarriage of the vehicle should be clean and free of dirt and oil. Any and all accessory products must be attached to the undercarriage; this will be inspected by the Judge.

4.The judges will inspect the shock absorber system to verify if it is a spring and shock or strut configuration. The judges will determine if the competitor used lowering springs or a coil-over system. Suspensions that are rare, or any added

90

or upgraded sway bars, strut bars, and/or anti-roll bars as well as upgraded bushings will receive maximum points. The judges will be looking for the sus- pension to match the theme of the car.

5.The judges will examine all moving parts of the vehicle body, such as the hood, the doors and the trunk lid will be checked for consistency in their operation, alignment and gaps.

6. In order to receive maximum points it may be necessary for the

competi-

tor to remove at least one of the wheels from the vehicle in order for judges to

inspect and verify the judging criteria.

 

EXTERIOR VEHICLE CLEANLINESS

Rookie Division

1 to 5 points possible

Street & Ultimate Divisions

1 to 10 points possible

1.Overall cleanliness - The judges will inspect the exterior paint for dust, finger- prints and dirt spots, polish or wax residue, etc.

2.All vehicle accessories should be polished and cleaned. The undercarriage and door jambs will be inspected for dirt and grease. Vehicles that are exceptionally clean will receive maximum points.

VEHICLE BODY MODIFICATIONS

Rookie Division

1 to 10 points possible

Street Division

1 to 20 points possible

Ultimate Division

1 to 30 points possible

1.All body kits attached to the vehicle should be mounted correctly and match the lines of the vehicles exterior.

2.All lights on the outside of the vehicle must work and be mounted safely to the vehicle & match the car‘s scheme and color.

3.Any factory or custom grills on the exterior of the vehicle should match the vehi- cle in cosmetics and be mounted properly.

4.The Judge will check for dents or scratches that may be visible, either on the entire body or modifications attached to the car.

5.The judges will check for overall cleanliness of the modified accessories at- tached to the car.

EXTERIOR CREATIVITY

Rookie Division

1 to 5 points possible

Street Division

1 to 10 points possible

Ultimate Division

1 to 15 points possible

1.Judges will award points for any exterior modifications, paint, accessories, or themes that are hard to achieve and make the vehicle stand out from other

competitors.

2. Judges will award points for custom paint and color coordination that includes any accessories on the outside of the vehicle as well as any special wheel modifications, motorization or special elements.

91

ENGINE COMPARTMENT

 

ENGINE COMPARTMENT APPEARANCE

 

Rookie Division

1 to 5 points possible

Street Division

1 to 10 points possible

Ultimate Division

1 to 15 points possible

1. Judges will inspect the engine compartment to verify that all engine accesso- ries are correctly mounted and what condition the accessories are in, whether new or used/old.

2.Any extra modifications such as turbochargers, superchargers or NOS sys- tems must be connected and operating properly.

3.All wires should be routed neatly. Color coded wires will score higher points.

ENGINE COMPARTMENT CLEANLINESS

Rookie Division

1 to 5 points possible

Street & Ultimate Divisions

1 to 10 points possible

1.All chrome pieces inside the engine compartment must be clean and not discol- ored or chipped. This includes all wire mounting brackets and screws, intake manifold, battery connections, hoses, headers, exhaust, throttle body, or any other accessories within the engine compartment.

2.Any and all wiring inside the engine compartment should be clean & free of oil

and residue. Points will be deducted if any fluids appear to be leaking from inside the engine compartment.

3. The judges will look for the overall cleanliness within the engine compart- ment. It will be the responsibility of the competitor to have the hood open so that the entire engine compartment is in full view of the judges during the judg- ing process.

ENGINE MODIFICATIONS

Rookie Division

1 to 5 points possible

Street Division

1 to 10 points possible

Ultimate Division

1 to 15 points possible

In this section the judges will inspect any and all modifications to the engine. All mounting hardware including any nuts or bolts will also be inspected to ensure all equipment is securely fastened.

1.The judges will verify that all added accessories function properly.

2.It will be the responsibility of the competitor to demonstrate to the judge that the turbo, supercharger, & Nitrous Oxide attachments are functioning properly for

maximum points. The competitor can satisfy this requirement by added photo- graphs or visually verifying to the judge by showing the judge all the proper connections are correctly hooked up.

3.Any additional upgraded accessories such as exhaust, throttle body, intake

manifold and headers will be awarded additional points.

INTERIOR/CARGO AREA APPEARANCE

Rookie Division

1 to 5 points possible

Street Division

1 to 10 points possible

Ultimate Division

1 to 15 points possible

1.The inside of the vehicle and the trunk/hatchback area will be judged.

2. The judges will be looking for cleanliness and the amount of work involved in detailing the vehicle; including but not limited to, windows, carpet, air vents, tinted windows, seats etc.

92

INTERIOR/CARGO AREA CLEANLINESS

Rookie Division

1 to 5 points possible

Street & Ultimate Divisions

1 to 10 points possible

1.The interior compartment will be inspected for cleanliness.

2.The judges will look for any dust in the vents, windows, and in between seats.

3.Glove compartments should be free of items. The carpets and floor mats should be vacuumed and dust free.

INTERIOR/CARGO AREA MODIFICATIONS

Rookie Division

1 to 5 points possible

Street Division

1 to 10 points possible

Ultimate Division

1 to 15 points possible

1. In this category judges will inspect all aftermarket accessories to

deter-

mine if they have been secured and mounted correctly in the vehicle.

 

2.Maximum points will be awarded for color theme, craftsmanship, and installa- tion integrity.

3.Maximum points will be awarded for seat upgrades and custom dash kits such as carbon fiber or custom panels.

 

INTERIOR/CARGO AREA CREATIVITY

Rookie Division

1 to 5 points possible

Street Division

1 to 10 points possible

Ultimate Division

1 to 15 points possible

1.Any modifications, other than those that enhance the sound of the vehicle will be judged in this category.

2.The judges will award points on any creative items designed and built to en- hance the inside appearance of the vehicle.

3.Items that will be considered include, custom upholstery, seats, custom dash gauges, modified dash boards.

4.Any themes or designs will also be awarded points.

STEREO SYSTEM & SECURITY

The judges will evaluate the stereo system and the vehicle alarm.

1.It will be the responsibility of the competitor to demonstrate to the judges that all

stereo equipment and alarm functions work properly.

2. The judges will ask the competitor to turn the system on to verify that all the pieces in the vehicle connected to the stereo are functioning properly.

3. Any accessories such as DVD and/or games systems, additional television monitors will be awarded maximum points based on the quality of workmanship

and installation.

 

STEREO SYSTEM APPEARANCE

Rookie Division

1 to 5 points possible

Street Division

1 to 10 points possible

Ultimate Division

1 to 15 points possible

In this category judges will inspect the overall appearance of the stereo system. The competitor will be judged on cleanliness, system integration such as color selection, texture and blending of materials used as well as methods of integration and the fit and finish of all panels and trim kits.

93

STEREO CREATIVITY

Rookie Division

1 to 5 points possible

Street Division

1 to 10 points possible

Ultimate Division

1 to 15 points possible

In judging Creativity the judges will look for things that are difficult to accomplish and are unique and/or innovative and will consider the degree of difficulty of the overall stereo system. Each item can earn one point in the creativity judging section.

STEREO SYSTEM SAFETY

All Divisions 1 to 5 points possible

Each competitor will be judged on the installation safety of their stereo equip- ment. The following five items will be judged;

Appropriate Wires Fused 0 or 1 Point

All system wires connected to any positive battery post must be fused within 18 inches of wire length from the battery post and prior to the power cable's first pass through any sheet metal or other conductive material. If there is no fuse present or the fusing is located beyond 18 inches of wire length or after the power wire passes through sheet metal, the score is 0.

Appropriate power wire size 0 or 1 Point Proper sized wire gauge should be used for both positive and negative current requirements. If not, no points will be awarded. (See the Power Cable Calculator in the SQ section of this rule book.) There is no deduction for wires bigger than the minimum size specified by the Power Cable Cal- culator Chart.

All wires terminated properly 0 or 1 Point

All connections of wires and/or cables to terminals must be protected from corrosion, if located in a potentially corrosive environment. In addition, all +12v DC surfaces and connections must be securely covered with a non-conductive (Example: heat shrink tubing or some equivalent.) material.

All wires properly protected 0 or 1 Point

A non-conductive grommet and/or protective sleeve must protect all wires where they pass through any metal panel. This includes speaker and/or security & conven- ience option wires routed into doors.

Batteries Vented Properly 0 or 1 Point

Batteries connected to any charging system, that are installed in places other than the factory location, that are not vented to the outside of the vehicle will result in a point deduction.

SECURITY SYSTEM FEATURES

Rookie Division

1 to 5 points possible

Street Division

1 to 10 points possible

Ultimate Division

1 to 15 points possible

The competitor must demonstrate the ability of the alarm to protect and/or se- cure the vehicle. There are 2 (two) points possible for a functioning security system and 3 (three) additional points possible for increasing the usefulness of the security system.

The competitor must demonstrate the alarm‘s ability to protect and/or secure the vehicle. Functions will be awarded 1 (one) or 2 (two) according to the difficulty.

94

Points Breakdown Between Rookie, Street & Ultimate Divisions

Judging Category

Rookie

Street

Ultimate

 

 

 

 

IASCA Membership & Logo

0 or 5 points

0 or 5 points

0 or 5 points

 

 

 

 

Exterior Logos & Designs

1 to 5 points

1 to 10 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Presentation

1 to 5 points

1 to 10 points

1 to 10 points

 

 

 

 

Display

1 to 10 points

1 to 15 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Auxiliary Lighting

1 to 5 points

1 to 5 points

1 to 5 points

 

 

 

 

Application Type (Vinyl or Paint)

5 or 10 points

10 or 20 points

15 or 30 points

 

 

 

 

Exterior Application Quality

1 to 15 points

1 to 15 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Exterior Appearance

1 to 5 points

1 to 10 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Exterior Cleanliness

1 to 5 points

1 to 10 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Body Modifications

1 to 5 points

1 to 10 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Exterior Creativity

1 to 5 points

1 to 10 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Engine Compartment Appearance

1 to 5 points

1 to 10 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Engine Compartment Cleanliness

1 to 5 points

1 to 10 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Engine Modifications

1 to 5 points

1 to 10 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Interior Compartment Appearance

1 to 5 points

1 to 10 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Interior Compartment Cleanliness

1 to 5 points

1 to 10 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Interior & Trunk Modifications

1 to 5 points

1 to 10 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Interior Creativity

1 to 5 points

1 to 10 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Stereo System Appearance

1 to 5 points

1 to 10 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Stereo Creativity

1 to 5 points

1 to 10 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Stereo System Safety

1 to 5 points

1 to 5 points

1 to 5 points

 

 

 

 

Security System Features

1 to 5 points

1 to 10 points

1 to 15 points

 

 

 

 

Score Totals for Each Division

130 points

225 points

310 points

 

 

 

 

The following scales will be used in each of the judging categories found in IASCA Tuner Jam Competition

5 Point Scale

10 Point Scale

15 Point Scale

 

 

 

Perfect = 5 pt.

Perfect = 10 pt.

Perfect = 15 pt.

 

 

 

Exceptional = 4 pt.

Exceptional = 8 to 9 pt.

Exceptional = 12 to 14 pt.

 

 

 

Very Good = 3 pt.

Very Good = 6 to 7 pt.

Very Good = 8 to 11 pt.

 

 

 

Good = 2 pt.

Good = 4 to 5 pt.

Good = 4 to 7 pt.

 

 

 

Average= 1 pt.

Average = 1 to 3 pt.

Average = 1 to 3 pt.

 

 

 

95

The following pages describe the level of modifications allowed in each Tuner Jam Division. Please refer to these charts to determine what Division you

would compete in.

If you have a modification to your vehicle that isn‘t described in these charts, please contact the IASCA office for a ruling as to what division your vehicle would fit into.

Competitors in a lower Division (Rookie, Street) are allowed up to 2 modifications from the next higher Division.

Judges may reclassify your vehicle to a higher Division if excessive modifications are found.

IASCA Tuner Jam Modification chart for classification

 

 

 

 

 

 

Modification Type

Rookie

Street

Ultimate

 

 

 

 

Drive Train and Undercarriage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coil over suspension

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket lift kit up to 3 inches

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Stabilizer bars

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Rims and tires upgrade

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Rotors upgrade

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Painted brake parts

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket lift kit 4 inches and up

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Sport suspension

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Rotors and calipers upgrade

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Differential/axle upgrade

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Polished brake parts

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Air Ride 1/2 inch and below

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Hydraulics (2 pumps maximum)

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Hydraulics (3 pumps and up)

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Custom made lift kit

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Chromed suspension

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Complete brake system

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Frame modifications

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Differential/axle custom build or exchange

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Chromed brake parts

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Air Ride 5/8 inch and above

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

96

Exterior

Rookie

Street

Ultimate

 

 

 

 

Vinyl decals

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Vinyl graphics (one color)

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Rear wing

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Bolt on bumpers

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket mirrors

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket light bulbs

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Tonneau covers

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Grill inserts

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Neon lights (1 kit)

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Bolt on ground effects

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Shaved handles/antenna

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Shaved steps (pick-ups)

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Shaved tail gate/trunk

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Lambo doors

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket sunroof/moon roof

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket head/tail lights

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket marker lights

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket hood

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Custom Grill

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Motorized tonneau cover

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Vinyl graphics (multi color)

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

OEM color plus 1 color design

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Non-factory single color

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Suicide doors

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Electric/actuated doors/trunk

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Chopped body or body parts

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Non-factory multi color/air brush

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Body molded ground effects

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Custom applied head/tail lights

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Custom applied marker lights

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Vehicle front end exchange

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Vehicle rear end exchange

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Body molded bumpers

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

97

Engine

Rookie

Street

Ultimate

 

 

 

 

Air intake upgrade

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Exhaust upgrade

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Alternator OEM upgrade

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Loomed hoses

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

OEM polished parts

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Computer chip

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

NOS

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Engine upgrade

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Exhaust exchange

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Header/s

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Alternator exchange

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Painted parts

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Chromed parts (3 maximum)

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Braided covered hoses

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Non-factory Turbo

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Non-factory Supercharger

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Fuel system upgrade

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Ignition upgrade

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Custom computer

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Engine exchange

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Computer exchange

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Chromed parts (over 3 items)

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Braided custom hoses

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

98

Interior/Stereo

Rookie

Street

Ultimate

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket power accessories

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket pedals

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket shifter

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket gauges illumination

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket radio OEM location

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket speakers OEM location

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Subwoofers, 2 amplifiers (not custom)

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

OEM painted parts

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Custom floor mats

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Neon lights up to 3

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket gauges

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket radio custom

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Custom door panels

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Custom center console

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket seats

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

OEM seat upholstered

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Custom painted parts

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Neon lights 4 and up

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Aftermarket seats (custom upholstered)

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

OEM seat custom upholstered

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Roll cage

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Multiple motorized system parts

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Customized stereo parts

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Custom dash board

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Criteria

Rookie

Street

Ultimate

 

 

 

 

Street legal

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Security system

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Security system with 3 or more options

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

Not street legal

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

Total Number of Modifications Per Class

32

70

106

 

 

 

 

99

100

Section 10

Mobile Audio

Car Show

Judging

101

IASCA MACS (Mobile Audio Car Show)

MACS is a competition format designed for those who want to show off their vehicles and don‘t want to get too detailed in the judging of it. Competitors in a MACS

Competition only have to arrive at the event, park their vehicle, set it up for display and play some music and videos; they don‘t even have to be at their vehicle when it‘s being judged!

Judges will come to the vehicle and evaluate it on 5 scoring categories; Audio, Video, Install, Theme/Display and Overall Rating. Each category is scored on a 20 point scale and all categories are added together for a total score; that‘s it! The highest score will be the winner!

Classes in a MACS competition are at the discretion of the event promoter; we recommend 6 Classes for awards, based on the scoring categories. The recommended Classes for awards are;

ï‚·Best Audio

ï‚·Best Video

ï‚·Best Install

ï‚·Best Security

ï‚·Best Theme/Display

ï‚·Best Overall (Best of Show)

Other suggestions for Classes would be to follow the same criteria as Tuner Jam judging Divisions; Rookie, Street and Ultimate. Or, as an example, promoters can offer Classes in; vehicle types (American, Asian, European) or vehicle brands (Ford, Honda, Volkswagen), or even vehicle models (Honda Civics, Ford Mustangs, Audi A4s, etc.), depending on the type and amount of entries at the event. In all cases, the Class breakdown at an event is solely at the discretion of the show promoter. There is really only one requirement of competitors when it comes to judging their vehicle in MACS. Judges will be evaluating all MACS competitor vehicles based on the aforementioned criteria and all that‘s required is for the competitor to play the audio/video system while the vehicle is being judged… that‘s it!

COMPETITOR REQUIREMENTS FOR MACS JUDGING

Competitors are allowed to play any music or video of their choosing, as long as the music and videos are in good taste (no music or videos that contain ―Parental Advisories‖, lewd lyrics or nudity). Competitors may use any source to play system

(CD player, iPod, Video Game Console, etc.)

Competitors may present their vehicle to the judge if they choose to, but it is not a requirement. Any presentation must be kept to a 5 minute maximum presentation time; there will typically be a lot of competitors at a MACS event and judges are limited to 5 minutes per car to complete judging.

Also, competitors are encouraged to set up displays and show off their vehicles to the public; remember, we are judging the audio and video systems in the vehicle as well as the vehicle itself… this is a car show!

Scoring at a MACS competition is simple; Judges will start at 1 point (this is the lowest score possible) for all competitors and they will add points based on how well the vehicle and system do in each category. The better the audio system sounds, or the video system reproduces the media, or how good the install is, etc. will earn more points.

102

MACS SCORING/JUDGING

Judging is equally as straightforward as scoring; the following describes the judging procedure for each scoring category:

AUDIO – “Does it sound clear and balanced, pleasing to listen to?”

(1 to 20 points possible)

Judges will score Audio from a standing position outside the vehicle, while listening to the music chosen by the competitor. The Judges will evaluate audio from three areas; behind the vehicle, from the driver‘s side and the passenger‘s side. If the music is clear (vocals can be understood, volume is not overpowering), balanced (Bass does not overpower highs, or vice versa) and sounds pleasing to listen to (music is easy to listen to, not hard on the ears or hard to hear, sound is not distorted), the system will score well.

VIDEO – “Is/are the picture/s clear and accurate? Is video system built in to vehicle?”

(1 to 20 points possible)

Judges will score Video by evaluating all video system components. Video screens will be judged for picture clarity, color accuracy and consistency, while other video equipment (DVD players, video iPods, video game consoles, etc.) will be judged by how well they are built in to the vehicle; video equipment that is simply positioned in the vehicle and not properly mounted will score lower than a system that is properly mounted in the vehicle.

INSTALL – ―Is all Audio/Video equipment properly mounted? Is system protected with fusing?”

(1 to 20 points possible)

Judges will inspect the complete system for installation quality and integration into the vehicle. Scoring is also awarded for properly mounted equipment as well as properly protected equipment (e.g. fusing, proper wiring techniques, etc.). Judges will determine this by visual inspection only; however, if the competitor wishes to present installation photos to the judge they may do so; judges may or may not award additional points for photos. Equipment not properly mounted (bolted or screwed down) will score lower than equipment that is properly mounted.

THEME/DISPLAY – “Does the vehicle and system have a common theme and display? How elaborate is the vehicle display?

(1 to 20 points possible)

Judges will score this category based on how well the competitor has created a display and theme for their vehicle and system. Points may be awarded for vehicles that have a matching theme and display, or if the install and the theme/display of the vehicle match, etc. The more elaborate the display and theme, the more points will be awarded.

OVERALL – “Judge’s Overall Rating”

(1 to 20 points possible)

Judges will score this section based on how well they feel the competitor has

―brought together‖ all aspects of their vehicle, audio/video systems, installation and

Theme/Display. The judging of this category also takes into account the level of craftsmanship involved, whether the installation was done by the competitor or a shop and the competitor‘s knowledge of their system and vehicle.

103

104

105

IASCA NITEGLOW COMPETITION

JUDGING CATEGORIES

INTERIOR JUDGING

INTERIOR INSTALLATION INTEGRITY

All Divisions 1 to 10 points possible

1.All neon inside the vehicle should be installed securely and not interfere with the driver‘s ability to safely operate the vehicle.

2.Judges will evaluate the quality of work and elements of the installation of the neon that contribute to reliability, longevity, and/or durability of the neon as well as the overall fit and finish of the installation.

3.Aspects of the neon installation that the judges will consider include; overall fit and finish of the neon, reliability of the neon in both mounting and ease of accessibility for replacement.

4.Judges should consider proper mounting of any transformer/s used and ease of accessibility for replacement.

5.Neon should not interfere with normal driving habits and should have easy access to an on/off switch. All items will be taken into consideration for maximum points.

INTERIOR WIRING

All Divisions 1 to 10 points possible

1.All neon inside the vehicle should be wired neatly, with the use of appropriate connectivity, fusing and appropriately terminated to ground. Maximum points should be awarded for cosmetics and ease of replacement as well as safety.

2.Judges will evaluate that neon is properly fused, that all wires are properly protected and terminated, and secured in an orderly fashion. Fuses must be located within 18 inches of the battery and be readily accessible within 30 seconds. In addition, all +12v DC surfaces and connections must be securely covered with a non-conductive material.

3.A non-conductive grommet and/or protective sleeve must protect any and all wires where they pass through any metal panel.

4.All wire connections from the transformer to the neon should be crimped and/or soldered and be protected with heat shrink wrapping for maximum points.

5.All interior wires connecting neon to neon should be hidden from view.

6.Wires under the dash, in the doorjambs, along body panels and all compartment locations should not be visible while sitting upright in any seat position.

INTERIOR COSMETIC INTEGRATION

All Divisions 1 to 10 points possible

1.Judges will determine how well the neon illuminates and highlights the interior of the vehicle.

2.Judges should consider theme, color matching and how well the neon displays other devices inside the vehicle such as speakers, doors, panels etc.

3.Judges will also consider the degree of difficulty involved with various elements of the neon installation along with the use of exotic materials, fasteners, and/or installation techniques.

106

INTERIOR QUANTITY

All Divisions 1 point per element up to 20 points

Points shall be awarded based on the quantity of individual neon tubes, shifters, tape or any other individual elements of neon used inside the vehicle.

INTERIOR CREATIVITY

All Divisions 1 to 15 points possible

Points shall be awarded for the degree of creativity applied to the installation and the operation of the neon. The judges will look for things that are difficult to accomplish and are unique and/or innovative and will consider the degree of difficulty for the execution of each element.

The following rules apply to the judging of Overall Creativity:

1.All vehicles will begin at ―0‖ points and can earn one or two points per application in a neon installation that enhances the performance, cosmetics, and operational safety.

2.The judges will consider the degree of difficulty for the execution of each element. For example: maximum points shall be awarded for neon pulsating to music, any unique neon logos and remote control operations. The judge/s must document the each item for which point/s are awarded.

EXTERIOR JUDGING

EXTERIOR INSTALLATION INTEGRITY

All Divisions 1 to 10 points possible

1.All neon outside the vehicle should be installed securely and not interfere with the driver‘s ability to safely operate the vehicle.

2.Judges will evaluate the quality of work and elements of the installation that contribute to reliability, longevity, and/or durability as well as the overall fit and finish of the installation.

3.Aspects of the installation that judges will consider include; overall fit and finish of the neon, reliability of the neon in both mounting and ease of accessibility for replacement.

4.Judges will consider proper mounting of any transformer/s used and ease of accessibility for replacement.

5.Judges will award maximum points for neon safety such as verifying that neon under vehicles is not subject to breaking. For example: verifying that neon would be secure should the vehicle travel over large speed bumps.

6.Any neon inside the engine compartment must not interfere with normal engine operation.

EXTERIOR WIRING

All Divisions 1 to 10 points possible

1.All neon outside the vehicle should be wired neatly and securely, with the use of appropriate connectivity, fusing and appropriately terminated to ground. Maximum points can be awarded for cosmetics and ease of replacement.

2.Judges will evaluate that neon is properly fused, that all wires are properly protected and terminated, and secured in an orderly fashion. Fuses must be located within 18 inches of the battery and be readily accessible within 30 seconds. In addition, all +12v DC surfaces and connections must be securely

107

covered with a non-conductive material. A non-conductive grommet and/or protective sleeve must protect any and all wires where they pass through any metal panel.

3.All neon connections of wires from the transformer to the neon should be crimped and/or soldered and be protected with heat shrink wrapping for maximum points.

4.All exterior wires connecting neon to neon should be secured. Wires running outside or under the vehicle should be properly protected to promote longevity.

EXTERIOR COSMETIC INTEGRATION

All Divisions 1 to 10 points possible

1.Judges will determine how well the neon illuminates and highlights the exterior of the vehicle.

2.Judges will consider theme, color matching and how well the neon displays other devices outside the vehicle such as color of vehicle.

3.Judges will also consider the degree of difficulty involved with various elements of the neon installation along with the use of exotic materials, fasteners, and/or installation techniques.

EXTERIOR QUANTITY

All Divisions 1 point per element up to 20 points

Points shall be awarded based on the quantity of individual neon tubes, engine neon, tape or any other individual elements of neon used outside the vehicle.

EXTERIOR CREATIVITY

All Divisions 1 to 15 points possible

Points shall be awarded for the degree of creativity applied to the installation and the operation of the neon. The judges will look for things that are difficult to accomplish and are unique and/or innovative and will consider the degree of difficulty for the execution of each element.

1.All vehicles will begin at ―0‖ points and can earn one or two points per application in a neon installation that enhances the performance, cosmetics, and operational safety.

2.The judges will consider the degree of difficulty for the execution of each element. For example: maximum points shall be awarded for neon pulsating to music, any unique neon logos and remote control operations.

3.Use of neon to highlight any equipment outside the vehicle. The judges will document the exact item for which point/s are awarded.

TIEBREAKERS

In the event of a tie, the following tie breaker sequence will be employed: The vehicle with the highest total interior score wins. Should a tie still remain, the vehicle with the highest exterior score wins. Should a tie still remain, the vehicle with the highest interior quantity of neon score wins. Should a tie still remain, the vehicle with the highest exterior quantity score wins. Should a tie still remain, affected contestants will equally share the final placing position.

108

BEST OF SHOW

This trophy is awarded to the best overall performance of any vehicle and driver or passengers. The judging will consist of the total score of Interior and Exterior scoring, plus the judge‘s overall rating.

1.Lighting performance.

2.Choice of music.

3.Driver and passenger posture and/or gesture.

4.Relative crowd response

5.Overall theme.

6.Any vehicle decoration display that enhances the Neon in and around the vehicle.

All decisions by the judges are final.

GENERAL CODE OF CONDUCT (All IASCA Formats)

1.All contestants are expected to conduct themselves in a lawfully prudent, mature and responsible manner.

2.The competitor registration form must be filled out completely and signed. The Waiver and Consent Agreement on the score sheet must be signed, confirming an understanding and acceptance of all of the rules, written, stated and implied. Unsigned and/or incomplete forms will be deemed invalid, null and void.

3.Abusive language or misconduct on the part of the contestants or judges is unacceptable and may result in dismissal from the event, as well as forfeiture of event registration fees or compensation.

4.The Head Judge can dismiss any contestant entered into IASCA competition without recourse, who is caught cheating during the event.

5.Judges decisions are final.

6.Absolutely no burnouts or hydraulic hopping is permitted in the judging lanes. Any infraction subjects contestant to immediate dismissal from the contest without recourse.

7.Contestants will be liable for any damages to judging area.

109

SECTION 12

TIPS FROM THE PROS

This section offers you tips from the pros in our industry; veteran competitors, dealers, installers, manufacturers, competitors and many others have taken the time to pass on some of their wisdom to you. There are many years of experience packed into these tips; they range from Sound Quality and Installation to RTA testing and

SPL how to‘s.

The opinions expressed in this section deal directly with what you get judged on and are the thoughts of each individual; they may not necessarily reflect the thoughts of IASCA Worldwide Inc. or its rules.

All competitors follow some basic standards that apply to car audio competition, but many have their own unique way of achieving the best sounding or loudest vehicle in their Class. These people have given of themselves to help educate you on how you can improve in what you love to do.

As we receive more thoughts and ideas from some of the most respected names in our industry, we will add their write ups to this section and send copies to you, so make sure you keep some space at the end of your book!

Read on and soak up as much knowledge as you can! Who knows, you may be the next IASCA World Champion just from learning some new ―tricks‖!

Tonal Accuracy (Sound Quality) by Scott Buwalda

Tonal accuracy is by far my favorite section on the score sheet, as it represents what truly embodies ―faithful reproduction of the musical source.‖

One of the most important things to do before even beginning the installation and tuning process is to calibrate your ears, and get a reference for your future listening tests. As an example, to really know what a snare drum sounds like, you must go and listen to one in person.

Listen to the timbre of different types of drum heads; how does an oil-filled head sound differ from a coated head? What is the effect of using wooden sticks verses nylon-tipped sticks, or fiber brushes verses steel brushes? Listen to how the tone of the snare drum changes with its depth, or how a loose drum head compares in sound to a tight drum head. And, just when the music store manager thinks you‘re crazy for tapping on snare drums, go to a live concert, and do it often. Whether it‘s listening to a snare drum, or a 200-piece orchestra, there‘s no substitute for the visceral impact and emotion of live, non amplified music. The human ear can always distinguish between live and recorded music; nothing else in life can touch your soul the way live music does.

IASCA wants nothing more than to know there are great sounding audio systems around the world competing in organized competition. As a musician, long-time car audiophile and speaker designer, I have found that when tonality is very good in a car, the other more objective categories, such as imaging and staging, seem to fall into place, and the system is pleasing to listen to for long periods of time. Isn‘t that why we do this, for the sake of the music? Become a student of sound, and it will pay dividends in the competition lanes.

110

Imaging (Sound Quality) by Scott Buwalda

Stereo Imaging represents an important suite of scored categories in IASCA SQ judging, and with a little time and effort, can be a readily achievable sound quality system attribute, as good imaging is based predominantly on the physical properties of timing and intensity of sound waves.

Quite possibly the most important functional consideration that an installer or do-it- yourself (DIY) enthusiast should give to speaker placement is to optimize, as best as possible, pathlength differences (PLD‘s) in the vehicle. PLD‘s are defined mathematically as follows (assuming a right-hand driven vehicle; PLD‘s are always a positive number): X – Y = Z

Where:

X = distance of the center of the left speaker from your left ear.

Y = distance of the center of the right speaker from your right ear. Z = pathlength difference.

Applying this formula, assume that the distance of the left speaker from your left ear is 140cm, and the distance of the right speaker from your right ear is 100cm, then the pathlength difference is 40cm.

Good stereo imaging is completely dependent on arrival times of the fundamental vocal frequencies (typically around 140 Hz and above).

Differences as little as 10 microseconds can be detected by the brain. A PLD of 30 centimeters equates to the sound from the nearest channel arriving about 9 milliseconds earlier than the furthest channel. It is generally accepted that PLD‘s be kept to less than 30 centimeters in a vehicle which is intended to have good image placement from both seated positions.

The best way to go about evaluating certain locations in your vehicle is, in general, to look for the potential locations as far forward and away from you as possible, but with still a ―line of sight‖ to the speakers (if you can‘t see the speakers, this might not be an ideal location, and you might be relying more on reflected energy at that point). An easy way to test various potential locations is to have a friend help you hold a tape measure or other measurement device from the potential speaker mounting locations, and measure those locations with respect to your ears.

There are three common mounting locations for front-stage speakers: dashboard/A pillar, doors, and kick panels.

In the dashboard/A pillar scenario, a small midrange and tweeter can be installed. While there are obvious benefits to this style of component installation, in many vehicles, the PLD‘s between the left and right speakers are large, due to the proximity of the listener to the near-side speaker. This configuration will undoubtedly require both time and intensity domain equalization in most vehicles to ensure a good, focused center image, properly located in the center of the sound stage for one seated position. There are, however, some rare exceptions, and you may actually find that the dashboard locations provide the best equalized PLD of the available mounting locations. Conversely, should the PLD‘s not be ideal, you may still want to consider this scenario to net several benefits of this design, but only if you have the ability to digitally manipulate both time and intensity; you may find that mounting the front stage drivers in this way to be the best compromise for stable stage height, focused images, and excellent tonality, but with good image placement from only one seated position. Good image placement from one seated position may not necessarily be a problem, however, as some classes within IASCA‘s judging framework are evaluated from only one seat, if you have the electronic

111

means to equalize both time and intensity, this could very well be the way to go for a solid, focused center image for the driver‘s seat.

In the next scenario, the speakers can be mounted in the front doors; in certain vehicles, door locations represent a mild improvement in PLD‘s from the dashboard and a-pillar location identified above. However, door speaker systems will likely continue to require digital time and intensity manipulation for a stable, focused center image for one seated position (unless of course a center channel is used with even higher level of digital processing). And often times, tactile response of the speakers will give their location away, and stage height and position and depth to soundstage can suffer. This design is likely the least favorable of the three scenarios offered here for most vehicles.

The third and final potential mounting location is in the kick panels, or front floor area in most unibody vehicles. In this scenario, the midrange (and potentially treble speakers as well) are placed far forward in the A-frame cavity of the kick panels, or in the forward floor area. In many cases the kick panel location affords the best equalization of path length differences for most vehicles, and will likely require only a minimum of digital time and intensity manipulation, if any at all, to achieve a well- placed center image for both seated positions in most vehicles.

The lesson to be learned here is that by taking a few moments to evaluate the potential mounting locations in your vehicle, in a very short period of time, you will be able to find the best location for your front stage speakers by determining the location with the smallest PLD.

Cosmetic Integration in a Stealth Type Installation

By Jeremy Carlson

Integrating aftermarket car audio products in to an interior can be the most challenging part of the install. Anyone can mount equipment in the hatch of a car, or throw a head unit into the dash opening. To do this correctly and to follow the IASCA rule book is where the challenge comes in.

Often the factory uses materials that are hard to find or buy aftermarket or they‘re just too expensive; when laying out the system installation it‘s important to keep these materials in mind. You want to build a system that performs at its best and looks like it was a factory upgrade. An example would be if the stock oversized head unit was textured ABS plastic to match the rest of the dash, don‘t change the color of the piece being fabricated so it stands out.

Make sure to follow a color theme in lighting as well, if the cluster of gauges has orange lighting; don‘t throw an aftermarket head unit in with blue lights on it. If the car has factory grille cloth on the door panels, and you are building kick panels, make sure you match that grille cloth there and through out the entire car.

Basically what it comes down to is planning, sit down in the beginning and plan the car from front to back, pick the materials that best match, choose the equipment that best flows, and have a plan! It will save you a lot of time in the future from going back to change things after an IASCA judge points them out, and last, but not least, have fun!

Jeremy Carlson

112

TONAL ACCURACY BY Jason Gay

Tracks 6 and 7 on the IASCA Sound Quality Reference CD are excellent tracks to evaluate Tonal Accuracy; track 6 focuses on sub bass while track 7 focuses on midbass and the rest of the frequency range.

One of the unique features of track 6 is that in the CD liner, it tells you what will happen at specific times; for instance at the 1:09 time mark there is a very low bass note that you should notice with a proper system set up. The note is low enough that you may not necessarily ―hear‖ it, but more so you should ―feel‖ it resonate through the vehicle as it plays.

Track 7 is a great track to check for any flaws in the system installation. Its strength in the midbass range, when played at higher volume levels will amplify any panel resonance in the vehicle; this will help you to determine problem areas with sound dampening (where it may be necessary) as well as installation weaknesses in the speaker mounting areas. The piano play in the track covers much of the sound spectrum; it should sound real and natural, not ―electronically‖ generated. Track 10 is also a good track to use for this purpose.

STAGING by Jason Gay

Track 10 is also very useful for determining the sound stage in a vehicle; right from the beginning of the track there is an accurate representation of all frequencies through the sound spectrum. What you need to listen for with this track is stage height stability; good sounding cars that score well will reproduce midbass at an equal height on the sound stage as the mids and highs. Weaker systems are usually frequency dependent when it comes to staging; lower notes have a tendency to sound like they‘re coming from the floor, while mids and highs seem to emanate above the dash. Speaker placement is critical for staging and, to create a strong, high sound stage, a competitor needs to focus in this area.

IMAGING by Jason Gay

I find tracks 15 and 16 are good tuning tools to determine proper imaging and its size. Track 16 has a female voice positioned center stage and track 16 has a male voice center stage; both, when played back through the system , should sound detailed and focused. Most systems however, will likely reproduce only one of the voices well (likely the female voice due to its higher frequency range). Typically, the male voice will sound very wide and unfocused due to the lower frequency ranges it utilizes. I like to call systems like this ―frequency dependent‖; when reproducing the male vocal on the center stage, it sounds like the voice is moving or wandering across the soundstage. Working with crossover points between the midbass, midrange and tweeters and adjusting speaker location can usually correct this.

WIRING by Jason Gay

The best piece of advice I can offer when it comes to wiring a vehicle for IASCA competition is “Pictures, pictures and more pictures!!” Receiving maximum points in the installation scoring of this section is giving yourself the ability to show the judges every detail of your system wiring, even the wiring that is hidden from view. Take pictures of everything that‘s connected to the system, including the fusing and wiring installation of every component in the vehicle; that means all the equipment (head unit, amplifier/s, processors, speakers, etc.) as well as the ―little things‖ like relays, fans, lighting, storage devices (capacitors/batteries) and switches.

113

One of the most overlooked items in an installation is the fusing; yes, we make sure we have fuses on all components, but we don‘t always make certain the fuse ratings match the current requirement of the equipment. Making certain that the fuse ratings match and that the system‘s main fuse rating equals the total current demand requirements is something that should always be done and documented in the installation log using photos and possibly a chart showing the values of each fuse.

One component that seems to be forgotten when it comes to fusing is the source (or head) unit of the system; they all have a fuse attached to their harness, but because it‘s already done we ignore the fact that we may have to access it if the fuse blows.

Always make sure you can access any fuse within 30 seconds and have a photo log indicating where they are located (if not visible); this will help you gain points in install judging and make your system the safest it can be!

FUSING IN IASCA COMPETITION by Mark Eldridge

HOW DOES A FUSE WORK?

A fuse is required to carry its rated load continuously, 135% of rated load for 1 hour, and double its rated load for 30 seconds. So, if a 500 amp fuse is used and the cable shorts to ground, it must generate 1,000 amps of current through the short to blow the fuse quickly, which isn't likely. Using too large a fuse is potentially very dangerous!

THE CREST FACTOR

Now that we know the basics of a fuse, how does it apply to use with audio equipment? To understand how it applies, we need to know about the Crest Factor. The Crest factor is simply the ratio of the peak signal level to the average signal level. An un-clipped sine wave has a crest factor of 3 dB (i.e. the peak level is double the power of the average level). Pink noise has a crest factor of 6 dB (the peak level is 4 times the power of the average level). For every 3 dB increase in the crest factor, the power level is divided by 2.

A crest factor of 10 dB means the peak power is 10 times the average power. 20 dB yields a peak power of 100 times the average. And a 30 dB crest factor yields a peak power 1,000 times the average!

Most music has a crest factor between 10 and 20 dB. Some of the newer popular recordings unfortunately have very low crest factors, often less than 10 dB. Music with a very low crest factor is not dynamic, has little impact, and typically sounds loud all the time.

Music that is very well recorded will have crest factors above 15 dB, and sometimes well into the 20+ dB range. (The James Newton Howard and Friends recording from Sheffield Labs has a 30 dB crest factor).

Now, amplifiers are rated at an RMS power output, which is simply the average output when reproducing an un-distorted sine wave. Since a sine wave has a crest factor of 3 dB, a 1,000 watt RMS rated amplifier will reproduce 2,000 watt peaks cleanly.

Now, let's take this 1,000 watt amplifier being driven to its maximum un-distorted output level of 2,000 watts with a music track having a crest factor of 20 dB. 2,000 watts divided by 100 = 20 watts average power output. If the crest factor is dropped to 10 dB, then the average power output will be 200 watts. And if really poorly recorded music is used with a crest factor of only 6 dB, the average power output

114

would be 500 watts. So as you can see, the actual power output of an amplifier reproducing music is nowhere near the theoretical maximum output. It may be as high as 1/2 the rated output with really poor recordings, but will likely be much less than this.

NOTE: This does not apply to SPL competition, where amplifiers are typically driven to their maximum output with sine waves, and are often driven into substantial clipping as well.

With the crest factor considerations in mind, I would suggest the following:

First, a maximum allowable fuse value can be calculated based simply on adding up the recommended fuse values for all the amplifiers, any larger than this would be grounds for points deductions or disqualification. And quite honestly, this would be severe overkill on the main system fuse anyway.

A more precise fuse rating can be calculated using the following method:

Determine the maximum peak power output of each amplifier by multiplying the rated RMS power by a factor of two.

Allow for the efficiency of each amplifier. For class-A/B amplifiers, assume 60% efficient, and for switching or class-D amplifiers, assume 80%.

Assume supply voltage is 12 volts (This can be argued to be higher or lower, depending on the system, but 12 volts is a good average)

Assume a worst case music crest factor of 6 dB, which means the average output power is 1/4 of the peak output.

(continued next page)

Calculation Example:

A system has (3) 1,000 watt Class-D amps, (2) 500 watt class-A/B amps, and (2) 150 watt class-A/B amps.

The recommended fuse values for the amplifiers are as follows:

1,000 watt amplifiers - 100 amps each

500 watt amplifiers - 70 amps each

150 watt amplifiers - 25 amps each

The maximum allowable main system fuse size would be: (100 amp X 3) + (75 amp X 2) + (25 amp X 2) = 500 amp

Now calculate the fuse value with peak outputs utilizing Crest factors:

The maximum peak outputs will be the RMS outputs multiplied by 2 to get the peak output for each amplifier:

1,000 watts X 2 = 2,000 watts

500 watts X 2 = 1,000 watts

150 watts X 2 = 300 watts

Taking efficiency into account:

2,000 / 0.8 = 2,500 watts

1,000 / 0.6 = 1,667 watts

300 / 0.6 = 500 watts

115

So the total power draw for the amplifiers would be:

2,500 X 3 amplifiers = 7,500 watts

1,667 X 2 amplifiers = 3,334 watts

500 X 2 amplifiers = 1,000 watts

The total power required for all the amplifiers to be driven to maximum peak output simultaneously would be 11,834 watts.

Now, take the 6 dB crest factor into account by simply dividing the above peak output by 4:

11,834 / 4 = 2959 watts

Now divide this by 12 volts: 2959 / 12 = 247 amps

A 250 amp fuse would be a much more realistic value than the 500 amp fuse that would be required by adding the recommended fuse values for all the amplifiers.

Notice that for a crest factor of 6 dB, the fuse value would be approximately 1/2 that of the fuse calculated by adding the recommended fuses together. If the crest factor is 9 dB, the fuse value would be 1/4, and for a crest factor of 15 dB, the fuse value would be 1/16th.

I have tested this technique, and have never had a problem burning a main fuse calculated simply by adding the ratings of all the amplifiers and dividing by two. This is the same as going through the entire calculation for a crest factor of 6 dB.

I know going through the entire calculation is somewhat confusing, and may be difficult to fully explain in the rule book, but this is how it works. And, using a fuse as large as that calculated by simply adding up the recommended fuses values for each amplifier will be overkill, and could even be dangerous.

Mark Eldridge meldridge@mblsound.com Mobile Phone (918) 810-2535

Mobile Soundstage Engineering 11110-J South 82nd East Place Bixby, OK 74008 www.mblsound.com

116