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A STUDY ON CUSTOMER SATISFACTION TOWARDS

INPATIENT SERVICES AT

GLOBAL HOSPITALS & HEALTH CITY

A PROJECT REPORT

Submitted to

The Tamil Nadu Dr.M.G.R Medical University

In partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of the Degree of

M.B.A (HOSPITAL&HEALTH SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT)

By

P.V.GUNASEKHAR CHOWDARY

Reg.No:43111402

Under the Guidance & Supervision of

DR.G.RAJASEKHAR

Medical Director

GLOBAL COLLEGE OF ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES

(Affiliated to The Tamil Nadu Dr.M.G.R Medical University)

JULY-2013

GLOBAL COLLEGE OF ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES

(Affiliated to The Tamil Nadu Dr.M.G.R Medical University)

No: 439, Cheran Nagar, Perumbakkam, Chennai – 600 095.

CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that this research project entitled “A STUDY ON CUSTOMER

SATISFACTION TOWARDS INPATIENT SERVICES AT GLOBA HOSPITAL & HEALTH CITY” is the bonafide Project Work done by MR.P.V.GUNASEKHAR CHOWDARY, Reg.No:431114402 in partial fulfillment of the requirement of M.B.A.(Hospital & Health Systems Management) degree programme in The Global College of Allied Health Sciences affiliated to The Tamil Nadu Dr.M.G.R Medical University, Chennai during the academic year 2012-2013(April-June 2013).

The Project Work is an independent and original work of the student under my supervision and guidance.

REGISTRAR

PROJECT GUIDE

 

Dr.G.Rajasekhar

 

Médical Directos

Place: Chennai

Date:

Submitted to the Department of Allied Health Sciences, The Tamil Nadu Dr.M.G.R Medical

University for the Examination Held on __________________.

External Examiner: 1.

2.

DECLARATION

I hereby declare that this project work entitled “A STUDY ON CUSTOMER

SATISFACTION TOWARDS INPATIENT SERVICES AT GLOBA HOSPITAL & HEALTH CITY” submitted by me in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of M.B.A. (Hospital & Health Systems Management) to The Global College of Allied Health Sciences affiliated to Tamil Nadu Dr.M.G.R Medical University is the result of my original and independent research work carried out under the guidance and supervision of Dr.G.Rajasekhar, Medical Director, Global Hospitals & Health City

2012 –2013 (April-June 2013).

I further declare that this Project work or any part thereof has not been submitted by me anywhere for the award of any Degree, Diploma, or other similar title before.

(P.V.GUNASEKHAR CHOWDARY)

Place: Chennai

Date:

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The successful completion of my project is due to the guidance and encouragement provided by several individuals. I wish to thank all those who added value to my project.

I am awfully thankful to Dr. K. Ravindranath, Chairman and Managing Director,

Global Hospitals & Health City, who gave me an opportunity to pursue the Degree of MBA (Hospital & Health System Management).

I am extremely thankful to Dr. C. Emmanuel, Director, Global College of Allied Health Sciences, who gave me an opportunity to carry out my project.

I take an immense pleasure in thanking my Guide Dr. G. Rajasekhar, Medical Director, Global Hospitals & Health City, whose continuous guidance and supervision ensured the successful completion of my project.

I take it as a privileged to express my sincere gratitude to Mr. G. Senthil Kumar, Assistant Professor, and Faculty of Management Sciences, whose continuous encouragement and support made my project a great successful.

I sincerely thank Mr. P. Kandaswamy, Manager, Global College of Allied Health Sciences, for the kind cooperation and support in completion of my project.

I am grateful to Ms. S. G. Ambika, Operations Executive, Global Hospitals & Health City for supporting me to conduct the study.

I thank my Father, Mother and Sister who supported and encouraged me in every step of the project.

My special thanks to my Friends who helped me in carrying out the project.

I express my gratitude to the Almighty God whose blessings lead me to complete this project in a successful manner.

CONTENTS

CHAPTER

 

TITLE

PAGE NO.

NO.

 

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.1

Background of the study

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.2

Statement of the problem

 

 

 

 

 

I.

1.3

Objectives of the Study

 

 

 

 

 

1.4

Scope for the Study

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.5

Limitations of the Study

 

 

 

 

II.

PROFILE OF THE ORGANISATION

 

 

 

 

III.

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

 

 

 

 

 

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.1

Area of Research

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.2

Research Design

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.3

Sources of Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.4

Period of Study

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.5

Sample Size

 

IV.

 

 

4.6 Sampling Technique

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.7

Statistical Tools used

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.8

Pilot Study

 

 

 

 

V.

ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATIONS

 

 

 

 

VI.

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS

 

 

 

 

VII.

SUGGESTION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

 

 

 

 

VIII.

CONCLUSION

 

 

 

 

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix

 

 

a.

Questionnaire

 

 

b.

List of Exhibits

 

LIST OF TABLES

TABLE

TITLE

PAGE NO.

NO.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I. PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS

 

 

 

 

5.1

Gender of Respondents

 

 

 

 

5.2

Age of the Respondents

 

 

 

 

5.3

Marital status of the Respondents

 

 

 

 

5.4

Educational Qualification of the Respondents

 

 

 

 

5.5

Occupation of the Respondents

 

 

 

 

5.6

Annual Family Income of the Respondents

 

 

 

 

5.7

Satisfaction Towards Information Provided by the Admission

 

Staff

 

 

 

5.8

Satisfaction of Patients Towards Attitude and Supportiveness of

 

Nursing Staff

 

 

 

5.9

Responsiveness and Time Spent by the Doctors in Active

 

Patient Care

 

 

 

5.10

Responsiveness of the Doctors and Nurses to the Patients’

 

Concerns and Complaints

 

 

 

5.11

Health Care Providers’ Respect Towards the Patients’ Right to

 

Privacy

 

 

 

5.12

Attention and Care Provided by the Lab and Radiology Staff

 

during Procedures

 

 

 

5.13

Involvement of the Patients in Treatment Decisions offered by the

 

Doctors

 

 

 

5.14

Satisfaction Towards Courtesy Shown by the Supportive Staff

 

 

 

 

5.15

Regularity of the Guest Relation Staffs’ visit and their

 

Responsiveness to Patients’ Complaints

 

 

 

5.16

Information Received by the Patients about their Condition and

 

Treatment from Health Care Providers

 

 

 

5.17

Level of Satisfaction Rated by the Patients in Various Wards

 

during their Stay in Hospital

 

 

 

5.18

Patients’ Opinion about Cleanliness and Comfort of Stay in

 

Various Wards

 

 

 

5.19

Customers Opinion About Cost of Consultation

 

 

 

 

5.20

Perception about the Cost of Treatment

 

 

 

 

5.21

Affordability of the Bed Charges

 

 

 

 

5.22

Perception about the Cost of Diagnostic Services

 

 

 

 

5.23

Reasonability of the Hospital Charges based on the Quality of

 

Services offered

 

 

 

TABLE

TITLE

PAGE NO.

NO.

 

 

 

 

 

 

II. WEIGHTED AVERAGE

 

 

 

 

5.24

Satisfaction Of In-Patients Regarding Medical And Supportive

 

Services Provided At Global Hospitals & Health City

 

 

 

5.25

Satisfaction Of In-Patients Regarding Ancillary Services

 

Provided At Global Hospitals & Health City

 

 

 

 

III. COEFFICIENT OF CORRELATION

 

Coefficient of Correlation between Medical Services and Overall

5.26Satisfaction Derived from Various Services at Global Hospitals & Health City.

Correlation between Nursing Services and Overall Satisfaction

5.27derived from Various Services at Global Hospitals & Health City.

5.28Correlation between Dietary Services and Overall Satisfaction derived from Various Services at Global Hospitals & Health City

5.29Correlation between Billing Services and Overall Satisfaction derived from Various Services at Global Hospitals & Health City Correlation between Infrastructural Facilities and Overall

5.30Satisfaction derived from Various Services at Global Hospitals & Health City

 

VI. CHI – SQUARE ANALYSIS

 

 

 

5.31

Overall Satisfaction derived from Various Services Among

 

Gender

 

 

 

5.32

Overall Satisfaction derived from Various Services Among Age

 

 

 

 

5.33

Overall Satisfaction derived from Various Services Among

 

Educational Qualification

 

 

 

5.34

Overall Satisfaction derived from Various Services Among

 

Occupation

 

 

 

5.35

Overall Satisfaction derived from Various Services Among

 

Annual Income

 

 

 

LIST OF CHARTS

CHART

TITLE

PAGE NO.

NO.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I. PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS

 

 

 

 

1

Gender of Respondents

 

 

 

 

2

Age of the Respondents

 

 

 

 

3

Marital status of the Respondents

 

 

 

 

4

Educational Qualification of the Respondents

 

 

 

 

5

Occupation of the Respondents

 

 

 

 

6

Annual Family Income of the Respondents

 

 

 

 

7

Satisfaction Towards Information Provided by the Admission

 

Staff

 

 

 

8

Satisfaction of Patients Towards Attitude and Supportiveness of

 

Nursing Staff

 

 

 

9

Responsiveness and Time Spent by the Doctors in Active

 

Patient Care

 

 

 

10

Responsiveness of the Doctors and Nurses to the Patients’

 

Concerns and Complaints

 

 

 

11

Health Care Providers’ Respect Towards the Patients’ Right to

 

Privacy

 

 

 

12

Attention and Care Provided by the Lab and Radiology Staff

 

during Procedures

 

 

 

13

Involvement of the Patients in Treatment Decisions offered by

 

the Doctors

 

 

 

14

Satisfaction Towards Courtesy Shown by the Supportive Staff

 

 

 

 

15

Regularity of the Guest Relation Staffs’ visit and their

 

Responsiveness to Patients’ Complaints

 

 

 

16

Information Received by the Patients about their Condition and

 

Treatment from Health Care Providers

 

 

 

17

Level of Satisfaction Rated by the Patients in Various Wards

 

during their Stay in Hospital

 

 

 

18

Patients’ Opinion about Cleanliness and Comfort of Stay in

 

Various Wards

 

 

 

19

Customers Opinion About Cost of Consultation

 

 

 

 

20

Perception about the Cost of Treatment

 

 

 

 

21

Affordability of the Bed Charges

 

 

 

 

22

Perception about the Cost of Diagnostic Services

 

 

 

 

23

Reasonability of the Hospital Charges based on the Quality of

 

Services offered

 

 

 

CHART

TITLE

PAGE NO.

NO.

 

 

 

 

 

 

II. WEIGHTED AVERAGE

 

 

 

 

24

Satisfaction Of In-Patients Regarding Medical And Supportive

 

Services Provided At Global Hospitals & Health City

 

 

 

25

Satisfaction Of In-Patients Regarding Ancillary Services

 

Provided At Global Hospitals & Health City

 

 

 

 

Satisfaction of In-Patients Regarding Various Services Provided

 

26

at Global Hospitals & Health City

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER – I

INTRODUCTION

1.1BACKGROUND OF STUDY

Health care scenario is changing at a faster pace all over the world. Patient satisfaction is one of the established yardsticks to measure the success of the services being provided in the hospitals. Improved socio-economic status and easier access to medical services have led to high expectations and demand from the consumers of hospital services. A patient is the ultimate consumer of the hospital. Hence, monitoring of patients’ perception is a simple but important strategy to assess the performance of various health care services.

In the present health care industry, individuals have a wide choice when deciding on the selection of a specific health care provider. Due to the varying options, quality and service stand as two essential elements that influence the selection process. Quality of patient care services is for many, a readily understood health care standard. Thus, a healthcare organization’s reputation for its commitment to quality and patient-centred customer service stand as the main criteria for individuals in choosing the health service provider. “Therefore, measurement of patient satisfaction and incorporating results to create a culture where service is deemed important should be a strategic goal for all healthcare organizations”

Over the recent past, the issue of patient satisfaction has gained increasing attention from executives across the healthcare industry. As a result, industry leaders have been focusing their attention on improving patient satisfaction through various initiatives. However, despite their many efforts and successes, evidence showed that more work in this area is still needed.

One of the primary challenges has been in sustaining enthusiasm for and focusing on patient satisfaction projects in view of “competing priorities, shrinking resources and an increasingly frustrated patient and employee or physician population”. This seemingly national trend is apparent throughout the health care even at the local level.

MEASURING CUSTOMER SATISFACTION

Organizations need to retain existing customers while targeting non-customers. Measuring customer satisfaction provides an indication of how successful the organization is at providing products and/or services to the marketplace.

Customer satisfaction is an abstract concept and the actual manifestation of the state of satisfaction will vary from person to person and product/service to product/service. The state of satisfaction depends on a number of both psychological and physical variables which correlate with satisfaction behaviors such as return and recommend rate. The level of satisfaction can also vary depending on other factors the customer, such as other products against which the customer can compare the organization's products.

Work done by Parasuraman, Zeithaml and Berry (Leonard L) between 1985 and 1988 delivered SERVQUAL which provides the basis for the measurement of customer satisfaction with a service by using the gap between the customer's expectation of performance and their perceived experience of performance. This provides the researcher with a satisfaction "gap" which is semi-quantitative in nature. Cronin and Taylor extended the disconfirmation theory by combining the "gap" described by Parasuraman, Zeithaml and Berry as two different measures (perception and expectation) into a single measurement of performance relative to expectation.

The usual measures of customer satisfaction involve a survey with a set of statements using a Likert Technique or scale. The customer is asked to evaluate each statement in terms of their perception and expectation of performance of the service being measured.

PRINCIPLES OF CUSTOMER SATISFACTION:

QUALITY OF CARE:

The quality patient experience doesn’t happen by accident but by standardized practice.

A consistently great patient experience is not a matter of attitude, awareness or positive intent but a matter of design and continuous quality improvement.

MANAGING ANXIETY, FEAR AND PAIN:

Patients are highly anxious.

To create an exceptional patient experience, we need to focus on preventing or

lessening anxiety for patients and families. BETTER COMMUNICATION:

If we don’t communicate our caring, patients and families might think we don’t care.

PERSONAL ATTENTION:

Patients and families want personalised care and service.

STAFF ACCOUNTABILITY:

All staff must be accountable for their role - Clear responsibility, Clear

performance, Sound measurement and feedback SOUND ORGANISATION CULTURE:

The more strongly your hospital’s culture supports the quality patient experience, the more sustainable are impressive levels of patient satisfaction. Effective long- term strategies inevitably involve a fresh look at the hospital culture and how it drives or restrains your patient experience vision.

IMPROVING CUSTOMER SATISFACTION

Published standards exist to help organizations develop their current levels of customer satisfaction. The International Customer Service Institute (TICSI) has released The International Customer Service Standard (TICSS). TICSS enables organizations to focus their attention on delivering excellence in the management of customer service, whilst at the same time providing recognition of success through a 3rd Party registration scheme. TICSS focuses an organization’s attention on delivering increased customer satisfaction by helping the organization through a Service Quality Model.

The International Customer Service Standard- Service Quality Model uses the 5 P's - Policy, Processes, People, Premises, Product/Services, as well as performance measurement. The implementation of a customer service standard should lead to higher levels of customer satisfaction, which in turn influences customer retention and customer loyalty.

IDENTIFYING YOUR CUSTOMERS EXPECTATIONS

Customers have expectations of all the companies (Hospitals) with which they transact business. These expectations may be predominantly unspoken but, all the same, they have a strong influence on how your hospital, its employees, products, and services are perceived. In the first lesson of this course, you'll be shown what characteristics customers want to see demonstrated, what external influences generate customers' expectations, and how your company's ability to fulfill expectations at various levels impacts on customer satisfaction. Too often, the service that customers receive is based more on the needs of the hospital than the wants of the customer. Customer feedback is essential there is no substitute for asking customers to tell you what they want your hospital's ability to satisfy their expectations depend on it.

DEALING WITH CUSTOMER COMPLAINTS

When a customer contacts your hospital to complain about a product or service received, it can be a blessing in disguise. For every person who complains, there can be hundreds who do not bother to complain but who also spread negative comments about your hospital.

In situations where customer complaints occur, the complaint must be dealt with immediately and the cause of the complaint rectified. Some hospitals are not concerned with quality and often ignore complaints or deal with them dishonestly. Seeking customer satisfaction benefits a hospital in the long run.

Questions you may have include:

How should a hospital deal with a customer complaint?

What are the benefits of satisfying complaints?

MAJOR CONCERN ABOUT COMPLAINTS

For every formal complaint you receive, there may be 10 other customers who were dissatisfied and who felt like complaining, but who never did. Instead, they change brands and tell their friends of the dissatisfaction. It is said that an unhappy customer will tell 13 people about his or her dissatisfaction. That is not the type of word-of-mouth advertising you want.

The hospital’s goal should be to get no complaints at all.

CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IN 7 STEPS

It's a well known fact that no business can exist without customers. In the business of Website design, it's important to work closely with your customers to make sure the site or system you create for them is as close to their requirements as you can manage. Because it is critical that you form a close working relationship with your client, customer service is of vital importance. What follows are a selection of tips that will make your clients feel valued, wanted and loved.

1. Encourage Face-to-Face Dealings

This is the most daunting and downright scary part of interacting with a customer. If you're not used to this sort of thing it can be a pretty nerve-wracking experience. Rest assured, though, it does get easier over time. It's important to meet your customers face to face at least once or even twice during the course of a project.

2. Respond to Messages Promptly & Keep Your Clients Informed

This goes without saying really. We all know how annoying it is to wait days for a response to an email or phone call. It might not always be practical to deal with all customers' queries within the space of a few hours, but at least email or call them back and let them know you've received their message and you'll contact them about it as soon as possible. Even if you're not able to solve a problem right away, let the customer know you're working on it.

3. Be Friendly and Approachable

A fellow Site Pointer once told me that you can hear a smile through the phone. This is very true. It's very important to be friendly, courteous and to make your clients feel like you're their friend and you're there to help them out. There will be times when you want to beat your clients over the head repeatedly with a blunt object - it happens to all of us. It's vital that you keep a clear head, respond to your clients' wishes as best you can, and at all times remain polite and courteous.

4. Have a Clearly-Defined Customer Service Policy

This may not be too important when you're just starting out, but a clearly defined customer service policy is going to save you a lot of time and effort in the long run. There's nothing more annoying for a client than being passed from person to person, or not knowing who to turn to. Making sure they know exactly what to do at each stage of their enquiry should be of utmost importance. So make sure your customer service policy is present on your site -- and anywhere else it may be useful.

5. Attention to Detail

Have you ever received a Happy Birthday email or card from a company you were a client of? Have you ever had a personalized sign-up confirmation email for a service that you could tell was typed from scratch? These little niceties can be time consuming and aren't always cost effective, but remember to do them. Even if it's as small as sending a Happy Holidays email to all your customers, it's something. It shows you care; it shows there are real people on the other end of that screen or telephone; and most importantly, it makes the customer feel welcomed, wanted and valued.

6. Anticipate Your Client's Needs & Go Out Of Your Way to Help Them Out

Sometimes this is easier said than done! However, achieving this supreme level of understanding with your clients will do wonders for your working relationship. Your client is heartily impressed, and remarks to his colleagues and friends how very helpful and considerate his Web designers are. Meanwhile, in your office, you lay back in your chair drinking your 7th cup of coffee that morning, safe in the knowledge this happy customer will send several referrals your way.

7. Honoring Your Promises

It's possible this is the most important point in this article. The simple message: when you promise something, deliver. The most common example here is project delivery dates. Customer service, like any aspect of business, is a practiced art that takes time and effort to master. All you need to do to achieve this is to stop and switch roles with the customer. What would you want from your business if you were the client? How would you want to be treated? Treat your customers like your friends and they'll always come back.

FIVE ASPECTS OF CUSTOMER SATISFACTION

In the technical dimension (clinical practices and procedures):

Diagnoses are accurate: Clinicians are thinking through the unique details of each patient.

The right thing is done, and it is done right.

Careful and attentive follow-up care is the norm, not the exception.

In the structural dimension (financing procedures and policy):

Care, practices and financing are able to withstand the scrutiny of customers— patients, family members and community citizens.

Incentive structures include patient satisfaction.

In the interpersonal and psychological climate dimension:

All disciplines work as one team.

Constant and open communication prepares patients for delays, changes and outcomes.

In the leadership and management dimension:

Leaders talk to and survey patients. Such leaders recognize that many patients are quite capable of assessing their own progress and experiences.

Leaders are stewards of the customer’s resources (sometimes a counterweight to the provider’s initial thinking about his or her own best interests).

In the cultural dimension:

Hospitals are connected to and supportive of the community, with an eye on long- term relationships.

The traditions of the community and simultaneously for diversity, which is a delicate balance.

ENSURING CUSTOMER SATISFACTION AND ESTABLISHING GOOD PRACTICE

Patients are the foundation of our medical practice. It is very obvious that they must be satisfied. Do we always succeed?

Dynamics of medical practice today

Patient as a customer

Medical practice as business activity:

Health care as one of the largest service sector industry

Huge capital investments- expected returns

Drivers: technology, health regulations, health insurance, CPA, standard of living, influence of media, internet

Customer – service provider

Customer is the king

Patient satisfaction pays

Greater profitability.

Improved patient retention and patient loyalty.

Increased patient referrals.

Improved compliance.

Improved productivity.

Better staff morale.

Patient satisfaction pays

Reduced staff turnover.

Improved collections.

Greater efficiency.

Reduced risk of malpractice suit.

Personal and professional fulfillment.

The process of ensuring patient satisfaction

Patient Satisfaction = Clinical Quality + Service Quality

The Customers: types

Difficult to deal with: Demanding, annoying, unrealistic, loud and objectionable.

Desirable: pleasant, easygoing, intelligent, accommodating and knowledgeable

Others: timid, questioning, unprepared, lacking in knowledge and uncertain about what they want or need.

Have to handle all

Commitment

Emotional and intellectual pledge to a course of action

Your commitment to quality services must be 100%.

Guidelines to ensure commitment to quality

The physician needs to be a participative leader with conviction.

Have a statement of mission and vision for quality services and share it with the staff.

Recruit a high performance staff

Build a team which is committed to quality services.

Ensure commitment

Empower the employees to achieve goals of quality services

Ensure staff satisfaction and motivation by various means like good salary, appreciation for good work and imparting a feeling of importance

Do some medico-social activities in the hospital premises or get involved with similar activities done by other organizations.

Have accreditation by some regulatory authority or agency (e.g. ISO).

Expectations

Medical expectations: These relate to accurate diagnosis and treatment. This is dependent on the medical core competence.

Non-Medical expectations: These relate to physical facilities and functional components of services.

Few general expectations

1.To have clinical core competence.

Cure rate does matter

Luxurious physical facilities can’t substitute

CME

Good clinical methods

Exude confidence

Rational therapy

Evidence based practices

2.Honor the appointments. Appointment system should be accurate but flexible.

3.Communicate well with them in day to day language. Medical jargon should be avoided.

4.To listen to their problems patiently and give them enough time. Master the art of listening

5.Show personal concern for the patient.

Body language, greeting, a good first impression of a caring physician; make it visible that we are with them in their worst times too.

6.To explain everything about the illness and treatment.

A short detour through the illness - etiology, pathology, clinical features, diagnostic investigations, treatment and prevention

7.Staff which shows care, concern, courtesy and empathy.

Patients spend more time with paramedical staff

Behavior and attitude of the staff

Ask to go beyond the rules of duty to help

Handle personal and telephonic conversations

Emergency case, admissions

8.Provide reasonably good physical facilities.

Both outdoor as well as indoor

Approachable location with good parking facility

Child friendly environment, cleanliness, facilities for recreation (library, toys, music, TV etc.)

Proper place for eating

9.Impart health education: handouts, video examples.

10.Proper documentation.

11.To provide hospital information brochure and to have informative sign boards.

12.To have transparency in financial matters.

13.To use modern technology.

Computerization and adaptation to new technology for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

14.To have easy flow between various services.

Patient should not be wasting time to avail of various services.

Factors affecting expectations

Nature of medical illness.

Past experience in the same set up.

Experience at other set up.

Financial and social standing.

Level of education.

Continuity:

It ensures that services get better day after day.

“Can we do better?” is the guiding question

It is about accepting the fact that what you do today may not be appropriate or effective tomorrow.

Things do change.

Benchmarking:

Looking beyond to other setups for better services and customer satisfaction.

Opens windows of our mind and let in new ideas.

Setting standard of service for all aspects

Continuity also requires monitoring patient satisfaction. A formal comprehensive process for determining patient satisfaction may be in form of questionnaire.

1.2. STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM

Patient’s perception about the quality level of health services provided in the hospital seems to have been largely ignored by researchers and practitioners. Patients’ voice has to guide the design of healthcare services delivery processes in order to foster confidence and promote the usage of the healthcare facilities. In this line, we investigate the relationship of patients’ admissions, accommodation aspects, external environment and the care provided by doctors, nurses and other healthcare professionals with service quality mirrored on patients’ satisfaction. The current study is, therefore, patient-centred and identifies the quality factors that are important to patient.

1.3.OBJECTIVES

1To study the satisfaction of in-patients regarding various services provided at Global Hospitals and Health City.

2To study the satisfaction of in-patients regarding the behavior and attention of medical, nursing, and supportive staff.

3To compare the level of satisfaction perceived by patients admitted in various wards.

4To evaluate if the pricing has been suitably accepted by the patients.

1.4.NEED FOR THE STUDY

In the recent past, studies on patient satisfaction gained popularity and usefulness as it provided a chance to healthcare providers and managers to improve the inpatient services.

Patient’s feedback is necessary to identify the problems and to resolve them.

The proposed study will help to find out the faults which lead to patient dissatisfaction and to rectify them to increase their satisfaction.

Hence this study will be directed to assess the areas where there is a lack of patient satisfaction.

1.5.LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

Period of study is restricted to three months.

The study will be conducted on patients admitted in different wards, whose length of stay exceeds three days.

The study will depend upon the accuracy of information given by the patients.

The patients’ perception differs; the result obtained would not be generalized.

GLOB AL HOSPITALS & HEALTH CITY

CHENNAI

CHAPTER – II

PROFILE OF THE ORHANIZATION

ABOUT GLOBAL HOSPITALS & HEALTH CITY

Global Hospitals & Health City is a NABH accredited 500 bedded super Speciality tertiary care facility located off the IT Highway(OMR) at Chennai rendering 360 degree advanced tertiary health care services matching in the best available in the world. Every step is aimed at ensuring excellence in patient care through state-of- the art infrastructure, advanced technology and committed team work by internationally the renowned specialists for setting highest standards through dedicated research, continuous learning and quality and medical practices.

Global Hospitals constantly strive for quality and innovation. While advanced technology and modern facilities are crucial to the delivery of high quality medical care, it is the doctors, nurses and technicians who make Global Hospitals a place of highly specialized expertise.

The group’s success lies in the strong foundation values laid by its founders that serve as a source of inspiration for everyone who is connected to the venture, to continue working selflessly for the society.

HISTORY OF THE ORGANIZATION

Global Hospitals was founded by Dr. K. Ravindranath, an internationally renowned Surgical Gastroenterologist and his associates in Hyderabad in 1998. Though Dr. Ravindranath had to wait a while for the passage of the Human Organs Transplantation Act before he could design and build Global Hospitals, it soon became a synonym for outstanding and compassionate health care.

Following the success of the first center, Global Hospitals soon opened their doors in Bangalore and Chennai. Shortly afterwards it became the leader in performing liver, heart, lung, kidney and heart-lung transplantation, as well as bone marrow transplantation. The outcomes at Global are on par with the best centers in the world.

Today, Global Hospitals group is all set to spread its wings to Mumbai, Kolkata, Delhi and Bhubaneswar.

VISION AND MISSION OF GLOBAL HOSPITALS & HEALTH CITY

Vision

To be a world- class medical services provider turning distant possibilities into today’s realities.

Mission

To achieve our dream of a healthy world through continuous innovation, dedication to quality, and provision of compassionate and affordable medical services

Deploying state-of-art facilities and equipment

Attracting the most talented medical, scientific and support staff

Providing affordable healthcare of unsurpassed quality

Exceeding service expectations

Adhering to professional and scientific integrity

Embracing change and encouraging innovation.

QUALITY CELL IN GLOBAL HOSPITALS & HEALTH CITY

Quality Policy

Be a Center of Excellence in Healthcare through commitment to continuous quality improvement and adopting industry leading practices in safety.

Meet and exceed international Healthcare standards through our integrated model of healthcare quality systems and evidence based medicine.

Surpass patient expectations by delivering healthcare service that is caring and compassionate.

Develop team work and communication through encouraging multi- disciplinary collaborative practice.

Organizational Priorities

Our organizational priorities are aimed at deployment of our mission, vision, values and our quality policy throughout the organization in every location and every department.

Global Hospitals Group will focus significant effort in its ability to:

Integrate, as a unified organization, in multiple locations so that wherever our patients choose to be seen, they have the same experience and have access to all our facilities and services.

Build a culture of quality and safety across the organization so that all our facilities deliver highest quality care and service at all times.

Create a paperless organization through implementation of the fully automated HIS system across all our facilities being technologically superior and environment friendly.

Quality Improvement priorities

Standardize our systems, processes, policies and procedures across all hospitals in Global Hospitals Group.

Adopt the International Patients Safety Goals.

Implement Computerized Physician Order Entry and Electronic Health Records which will eliminate medical errors and improve patient care.

Develop training programs for all employees on principles and practice of healthcare quality.

ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

CHAIRMAN & MANAGING DIRECTOR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTERNATIONAL PATIENT SERVICES

DIRECTOR

 

 

 

 

 

 

CEO

 

ACADEMICS & REAEARCH

 

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO CEO

 

 

MEDICAL DIRECTOR

NUSRING DIRECTOR

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

HUMAN RESOURCES

MS OFFICE

CONSULTANTS

ANAESTHESIOLOGY & OPERATION THEATRE

BLOOD BANK

RADIOLOGY &

NUCLEAR

QUALITY ASSURANCE

NON–CONSULTANTS

PHYSICIANS

SECRETARY/

CLINICAL HR

ACCIDENT &

EMERGENCY

ALL CLINICAL &

SPECIALITY

DEPARTMENTS

MEDICAL RECORDS

LOBORATOTY

SERVICES

PHARMACY

SERVICES

DIETARY SERVICES

NURSING

SERVICES

TECHNICIANS-

OPERATION

THEATRE, ICU &

CSSD

OUT - PATIENT

IN - PATIENT

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

SUB - HOSPITALS

METITALS

MANAGEMENT

SATELITES

FINANCE &

HOSPITALITY

INTERNAL

BUSINE

ACCOUNTS

 

AUDIT

DEVELOP

GUEST RELATION &

COMMUNICATION

HOUSKEEPING

SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

& FIRE SAFETY

FOOD & BEVERAGES

INFORMATION

TECHNOLOGY

TRANSPORT

MAINTENANCE &

PROJECTS

INSTITUTES AND DEPARTMENTS

Institutes

Advanced Heart, Lung & Vascular Institute

Institute of Minimal Access & Bariatric Surgery

Institute of Liver, Pancreas Diseases & Transplant

Institute of Neuro Sciences & Spinal Disorders

Institute of Spine Surgery

Institute of Orthopaedics, Joint Replacement & Sports Medicine

Kidney Institute

Institute of Urology

Advanced Centre for Trauma & Emergency Care

Institute of Multi-Organ Transplant

Cancer Institute

Institute of Plastic, Reconstructive & Cosmetic Surgery

Institute of ENT, Head & Neck Surgery

Advanced Gastroenterology & Therapeutic Endoscopy

Institute of Paediatrics.

Departments

Department of Paediatric Cardiology

Department of Rheumatology

Department of Radiology & Imaging

Department of Dental & Maxillofacial Surgery

Department of Dermatology

Department of Pulmonology

Department of Transfusion Medicine

Department of Ophthalmology

Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology

Department of Laboratory Medicine

MILESTONES OF GLOBAL HOSPITALS & HEALTH CITY

On their way to becoming India’s leading chain of organ transplantation center and super- specialty care centers, Global Hospitals has set many industry firsts. This has given us tremendous confidence and encouragement to continue forging ahead in the field of medicine and surgery.

Leading Multi Organ Transplant Centre:

First Single Lung Transplant in India

First Paediatric Auxiliary Liver Transplant in Asia.

First Swap Liver Transplant on adults in India

First Liver Transplant in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India

First Bone Marrow Transplant in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India

First Heart Transplant in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India

First Split Liver Transplant in the state of Tamil Nadu, India

First Twin Kidney Transplant in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India.

First Hospital to introduce the Two Wheeler Ambulance Service (GART- Global Accident Rescue Team).

Largest Multi-organ Transplant centre

First Hospital in South Asia to perform the Nucleus Replacement in Spine

Only Indian Hospital to be associated with King's college hospital, London, United Kingdom for Liver transplantations.

First hospital to be recognized for Research and Development by the Govt. of India.

 

 

MILESTONES

 

 

 

Department

Year

Milestone

 

 

 

 

2010

Introduced information centre usage website, which is the first of its

 

kind in the world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2006

Use of video conferencing exchange of information

 

 

 

 

2005

Launched CAPD clinical coordination course working in India &

 

abroad

 

 

 

 

 

 

2005

Highest number of cadaver transplants in the state Andhra Pradesh,

Nephrology

India in the last 20 years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2003

Bilateral kidney transplant, first in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India

 

 

 

 

2002

First to start the cadaver renal transplant in the India

 

 

 

 

2002

Revolutionised CAPE ( Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis)

 

 

 

 

2002

The largest CAPD programme in India with least complications

 

 

 

 

2002

Introduced Renal critical care facility by continuous Renal

 

replacement therapy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2010

First hospital to start the cancer center for Liver and Pancreases

 

 

 

 

2003

First hospital to perform Cadaver Liver Transplant in the state of AP,

Liver

India

 

 

2003

Largest center performing Liver and Pancreatic surgeries in South

 

India

 

 

 

 

 

 

2010

Completed 15000 Radial procedures in May 2010 , which is the

 

highest volume in country

 

 

 

 

 

 

2006

Conducted interventional workshops (Unique for their challenging

 

cases)

 

 

 

 

 

 

2006

Expertise special technologies in chronic total occlusions intervention.

 

 

 

 

2005

The First hospital to perform Radial procedures.

 

 

 

Cardiology

2004

The First hospital to perform Heart Transplant in the state of AP

 

 

 

 

2004

Cardiologist from Sweden and Dubai are trained in our hospitals

 

 

 

 

2004

Introduced the 64 slice CT Angio Coronary for performing Non-

 

invasive procedures.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2004

First hospital to launch a Book on Radio procedures named as “Radial

 

Pearl”

 

 

 

 

 

 

2004

The First hospital in the country to carry out intravascular ultrasound

 

 

 

ALLIANCES:

Affiliation – King’s College Hospital, London, UK for Liver Transplantation.

Association- Medical University Of South Carolina, USA

Technology- Development Board, Department Of Sciences and Technology, Govt. Of India.

FACILITIES:

9 operation theatres

100 ICU beds

Audiology lab

Chemotherapy Suites

Cochlear implant and speech therapy

Dialysis unit

MRI

PET CT

Endoscopy Suite

Non-invasive Cardiology Lab

Outpatient Specialty clinics

Preventive Health checks

Pulmonary function lab

TrueBeam STx

PATIENT AMENITIES:

24 Hour Pharmacy

24 Hour Blood bank

24 Hour Imaging

Fully Equipped Ambulance Services

General Ward

Special Ward

Single Room

Double Room

Deluxe Room

Super Deluxe Room

INFRASTRUCTURE FACILITIES

OP Reception Desk

IP Lobby

Wards

CREDIENTALS

Hansa Research National Survey 2012 Repoeded that Global Health City id Ranked one of the Best Multi-Speciality Hospital in Chennai for the Year 2012.

Global Hospitals Group Received two Prestigeous Health Care Excellence Awards for the Year 2012 from FROST & SULLIVAN Health Care Providers Company.

RESEARCH

Global Hospitals have revolutionized medical services in India by seamless integration of Academics and Research. Global hospitals has produced some of the finest practitioners in the medical field and has done ground breaking research under the able guidance of Chairman and Managing Director, Dr. Ravindranath.

Global Clinical Research Services Overview

Founded in 2006 and headquartered in Hyderabad, Global Clinical Research Services (GCRS) is a comprehensive site management organization serving the biopharmaceutical and medical -device industry. Our mission has been, and will always be quality. We strive to lead the world in the diagnosis and treatment of disease and to train tomorrow's great doctors and nurses. Above all, we aim to provide the highest quality health-care services to all of our patients.

From escalating the span of our business to positioning our company ahead of competition in the SMO segment, we have emerged as the premium "Multi-site, Multi-specialty SMO" offering cost effective and competent clinical trial execution.

Our business practices are consistent with the Code of Ethics, Patient care, Strict Regulations and Timelines.

Therapeutic Specialties

GCRS strength is well trained, experienced professionals who have knowledge and experience in clinical operations, across various therapeutic groups and indications.

Therapeutic Specialties

1.Oncology

2.CNS

3.Cardiovascular

4.Diabetes and Endocrinology

5.Vaccines and Biologics

6.Gastroenterology

7.Spine Management

8.Pain / Inflammation

9.Nephrology

10.Urology

11.Orthopaedics

12.Obstetrics and Gynaecology

13.Medical Devices & Diagnostic Trials

14.Immunology

Our Expertise and Experience

GCRS acts as a common platform between the Principal Investigator(s) and Sponsor(s)/CRO(s) for the triumphant execution of clinical trials. In the span of six years we have successfully completed more than 150 studies with track record of exceeding enrolment goals for many of our clinical trials. Our team brings more than 150 years of collective experience in clinical research.

Our highly competent Project Management Team and Clinical Research Coordinators at each study site assist and support the investigators with all study related activities, ensure compliance with applicable regulations, ICH-GCP guidelines and efficient completion of assigned duties. Our CRCs have adequate operational knowledge of the research process, strong personal ethics and clinical competency.

GCRS claim strict adherence to protocol, compliance to regulatory norms, extensive documentation, absolute accuracy, an ethically sound patient recruitment strategy, and efficient site management through our well laid Site Management specific Standard Operating procedures (SOPs).

GCRS also conduct courses on Clinical Research, Data Management, Pharmacovigilance and Medical Writing.

Apart from this we provide periodical onsite developmental training for Investigators and Research Staff.

CHAPTER – III

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

3.1A SURVEY ON DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF AN IN-PATIENT SATISFACTION QUESTIONNAIRE

Author: Nerea González, Jose M. Quintana, Amaia Bilbao, Antonio Escobar, July, 2005.

Abstract:

To develop a psychometrically sound, hospital patient satisfaction questionnaire to be administered to patients discharged from medical and surgical services. A Cross-sectional survey was carried out in Spanish in Four acute care general hospitals of the Basque Health Service. Random samples of 50 discharged patients from each hospital during February and March 2002. A total of 1910 patients responded to the questionnaire. No socio demographic differences were found between respondents and non-respondents. Six dimensions were identified from the factor analysis, explaining 50% of the variance. All items, except two, revealed loadings above 0.4. Cronbach’s alpha exceeded 0.7 for all dimensions, except privacy. Comfort was the dimension with the lowest level of patient satisfaction, whereas privacy was the most satisfactory. The inter scale correlations never exceeded the internal consistency of each scale. The analysis of the dimensions with two items of global assessment showed a positive correlation. The results obtained from the development and validations of the questionnaire provide evidence of its psychometric properties, although it would be useful to carry out further analyses to assess time-based properties of reliability. We found a positive relation between the degree of patient satisfaction and overall evaluation of the quality of health care, providing evidence of the ability of the questionnaire to correlate with other concepts. The in-patient satisfaction questionnaire could become a useful instrument in quality-of-care assessment.

3.2.A SURVEY ON PATIENT SATISFACTION IN TWO CHINESE PROVINCES: RURAL AND URBAN DIFFERENCES

Author: Zhihua Yan, Dai Wanand Li Li, May 29, 2011

Abstract:

While international research on patient satisfaction on healthcare has grown tremendously in the past three decades, little research has been conducted concerning healthcare-related patient satisfaction in China. This study was designed to examine what factors including patients’ characteristics and ease of access to care are associated with level of patient satisfaction and how such satisfaction might differ across rural and urban populations in China. This study also serves as an evaluation of the recent healthcare reforms that have taken place in China, which were expected to equalize satisfaction between rural and urban patients. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess satisfaction among patients attending county-level hospitals in China. The Patient satisfaction was measured with 15 questions. The Perceived convenience was significantly associated with patient satisfaction among all participants. The new rural cooperative medical insurance scheme (NRCMIS) was associated with higher overall satisfaction among the rural residents. Age and income were significantly related to satisfaction only among rural patients. Rural residents benefit greatly from the implementation of NRCMIS. Future reform could be more effective by catering the needs of each specific group (e.g. low-income population, rural population, etc.) identified by this study.

3.3.A SURVEY ON THE PATIENT SATISFACTION CHASM: THE GAP BETWEEN HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT AND FRONTLINE CLINICIANS

Author: Ronen Rozenblum, Marianne Lisby, Peter M Hockey, Levtzion-Korach, 2012.

Abstract:

Achieving high levels of patient satisfaction requires hospital management to be proactive in patient-centred care improvement initiatives and to engage frontline clinicians in this process.

They collected 1004 questionnaires (79.9% response rate) from four hospitals in four countries on three continents. Overall, 90.4% of clinicians believed that improving patient satisfaction during hospitalisation was achievable, but only 9.2% of clinicians thought their department had a structured plan to do so, with significant differences between the countries (p<0.0001). Among responders, only 38% remembered targeted actions to improve patient satisfaction and just 34% stated having received feedback from hospital management regarding patient satisfaction status in their department during the past year. In multivariate analyses, clinicians who received feedback from hospital management and remembered targeted actions to improve patient satisfaction were more likely to state that their department had a structured plan to improve patient satisfaction. This portrait of clinicians’ attitudes highlights a chasm between hospital management and frontline clinicians with respect to improving patient satisfaction. It appears that while hospital management asserts that patient-centred care is important and invests in patient satisfaction and patient experience surveys, our findings suggest that the majority do not have a structured plan for promoting improvement of patient satisfaction and engaging clinicians in the process.

3.4.A SURVEY ON IMPACT OF INTEGRATION OF CLINICAL AND OUTPATIENT UNITS ON CANCER PATIENT SATISFACTION

Author: H. Wessels1, A. de Graeff, G. Groenewegen, K. Wynia, M. de Heus, J.B.H. Vos, P. Tjia, C.L.J.J. Kruitwagen, S.C.C.M. Teunissen, July 10, 2010.

Abstract:

There is an ongoing drive to measure and improve quality of care. Donabedians' quality framework with structure, process and outcome domains provides a useful hold to examine quality of care. The aim of this study was to address the effect of an intervention in hospital structure (integration of three units into one) with the purpose of improving processes (increase meeting, cooperation and communication between professionals and patients) and its effect on the outcome (cancer patient satisfaction). The study was conducted among 174 cancer patients at University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands, and Department of Medical Oncology. Satisfaction with care improved for six scales after integration. The most important improvement was found at the day-care clinic on aspects like ‘the degree in which the nurses were informed about a patients situation’, ‘privacy’, ‘interior design’, ‘quality of hospital equipment’, ‘sanitary supplies’ and ‘waiting periods’. With regard to continuity and coordination of care, satisfaction increased for five items. Integration of three oncology units into one unit had a positive impact on care delivery processes and resulted in improved patient satisfaction concerning care and treatment.

3.5.A SURVEY ON VALIDATION OF INPATIENT EXPERIENCE QUESTIONNAIRE

Author: Eliza L.Y. Wong Angela Coulter, Annie W.L. Cheung, Carrie H.K. Yam, E.K.Yeoh and Sian Griffiths, March 17, 2013

Abstract:

A Cross-sectional validation survey was carried out in this study to assess the acceptability, validity and reliability of the Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (HKIEQ), which was newly developed to measure patient experiences of hospital care in Hong Kong (HK) .The Main Outcome Measures the Principal component exploratory factor analysis, assessed the construct validity of the questionnaire. Cronbach's alpha coefficients and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient estimated the reliability of the instrument. Acceptability of the questionnaire regarding the percentage of missing value of individual items was also assessed. A total of 511 patients discharged from public hospitals in HK were interviewed. Low percentage of missing value (0.2 to 21.3%) showed high acceptability. Nine dimensions of hospital care explaining 75.4% of the variance were derived from factor analysis and content validity. These items showed satisfactory internal reliability consistency (0.49 to 0.97). Test–retest reliability ranged from 0.3 to 0.9. The HKIEQ performed well on several psychometric indicators and is a promising measure of patient experience with public hospital inpatient care in HK. The findings provided important insight on developing tools to measure patient experience in hospitals to improve the quality of care and to lay the foundation for further research on patient expectations and needs regarding hospitalization.

3.6.A SURVEY ON PATIENT SATISFACTION WITH AVAILABILITY OF GENERAL PRACTICE: AN INTERNATIONAL COMPARISON

Author: Michel Wensing, Peter Vedsted, Janko kersnik, Wim Peersman, Anja Klingenberg, Hilary Hearnshaw, November 22, 2001

Abstract:

To identify associations between the characteristics of general practitioners and practices, and patients’ evaluations of the availability of general practice. Written surveys were completed by patients. 15 99 adults’ patients consecutively visiting the general practitioner (response rates per country varied between 47 and 89%) were the study participants. The Europe instrument to assess patients’ evaluations of five aspects of the availability of general practice care: (1) getting an appointment, (2) getting through on the phone, (3) being able to speak to the practitioner on the telephone, (4) waiting time in the waiting room, and (5) providing quick services for urgent health problems. Each general practitioner recorded age, sex, number of years in the practice, number of practitioners and other care providers in the practice, and urbanization level of the practice. Patients’ more positive evaluations were associated with fewer general practitioners in the practice, except for quick services for urgent health problems (range of conditional overall odds ratios, 1.9–2.02). In addition, a number of significant unconditional overall odds ratios were found, particularly those related to the number of general practitioners’ working hours and the number of care providers in the practice. None of the associations was found consistently in all countries. Patients favour small practices and a full-time general practitioner, which contradicts developments in general practice in many countries. Policy makers should consider how the tensions between patients’ views and organizational developments can be solved.

3.7.A SURVEY ON MEASURING PATIENT SATISFACTION: A CASE STUDY TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF CARE AT PUBLIC HEALTH FACILITIES

Author: Prahlad Rai Sodani, Rajeev K Kumar, Jayati Srivastava, Lakshman, 2010 January

Abstract:

The main objective of the study is to measure the satisfaction of OPD (Outpatient Department) patients in public health facilities of Madhya Pradesh in India. Data was collected from OPD patients through pre-structured questionnaires at public health facilities in the sampled eight districts of Madhya Pradesh. The data was analyzed using SPSS. A total of 51 OPD patients were included in the study to know their perceptions towards the public health facilities, choosing health facility, registration process, basic amenities, perception towards doctors and other staff, perception towards pharmacy and dressing room services. It was found that most of the respondents were youth and having low level of education. The major reason of choosing the public health facility was inexpensiveness, infrastructure, and proximity of health facility. Measuring patient satisfaction was more satisfied with the basic amenities at higher health facilities compared to lower level facilities. It was also observed that the patients were more satisfied with the behaviour of doctors and staff at lower health facilities compared to higher level facilities.

3.8. A SURVEY ON PATIENT SATISFACTION AND ADMINISTRATIVE MEASURES AS INDICATORS OF THE QUALITY OF MENTAL HEALTH CARE

Author: Benjamin G. Druss, M.D., M.P.H. Robert A. Rosenheck, M.D.; Marilyn Stolar, M.A., 1999

Abstract:

Although measures of consumer satisfaction are increasingly used to supplement administrative measures in assessing quality of care, little is known about the association between these two types of indicators. This study examined the association between these measures at both an individual and a hospital level. A satisfaction questionnaire was mailed to veterans discharged during a three-month period from 121 Veterans Administration inpatient psychiatric units; 5,542 responded, for a 37 percent response rate. These data were merged with data from administrative utilization files. Random regression analysis was used to determine the association between satisfaction and administrative measures of quality for subsequent outpatient follow-up. At the patient level, satisfaction with several aspects of service delivery was associated with fewer readmissions and fewer days readmitted. Better alliance with inpatient staff was associated with higher administrative measures of rates of follow-up, promptness of follow-up, and continuity of outpatient care, as well as with longer stay for the initial hospitalization. At the hospital level, only one association between satisfaction and administrative measures was statistically significant. Hospitals where patients expressed greater satisfaction with their alliance with outpatient staff had higher scores on administrative measures of promptness and continuity of follow-up. The associations between patient satisfaction and administrative measures of quality at the individual level support the idea that these measures address a common underlying construct. The attenuation of the associations at the hospital level suggests that neither type can stand alone as a measure of quality across institutions.

3.9.A SURVEY ON THE PATIENT SATISFACTION STUDY IN A MULTISPECIALTY TERTIARY LEVEL HOSPITAL, PGIMER, CHANDIGARH, INDIA

Author: Raman Sharma (Department of Hospital Administration, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh, India), 24.2011

Abstract:

Against a background of growing consumerism, satisfying patients has become a key task for all healthcare activities. Satisfaction in service provision is increasingly being used as a measure of health system performance. Satisfaction manifests itself in the distribution, access and utilization of health services. This paper aims to address these issues. A cross sectional study was conducted to assess the patient satisfaction level visiting the hospital with the objectives to know the behaviour and clinical care by the clinicians and para-medical staff and in terms of amenities available. A pre-designed and pre-tested structured questionnaire was given to the respondents after the patients had undergone consultation with the doctor. A proportionate random sampling was done to select the subjects. It was found that average time spent by respondents for registration was 33.20 minutes. The overall satisfaction regarding the doctor-patient professional and behavioural communication was more than 80 per cent at almost all the levels of health care facilities. In total, 55 per cent of respondents opined that doctors have shown little interest to listen to their problem while 2/3 opined that doctors used medical and technical terms to explain their illness and its consequences. More than 70 per cent satisfaction level was observed with staff of laboratories and security personnel with their cooperation and sympathetic nature. More than 80.0 per cent were satisfied with basic amenities. Of these, 40.0 per cent were of the view that services were costlier than their affordability

3.10.A SURVEY ON FACTORS DETERMINING INPATIENT SATISFACTION WITH CARE

Author: Nguyen Thi PL, Briançon S, Empereur F, Guillemin F, 2002 February

Abstract:

The objective of the study was to identify factors associated with satisfaction among inpatients receiving medical and surgical care for cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary and locomotors system diseases. Two weeks after discharge, 533 patients completed a Patient Judgments Hospital Quality questionnaire covering seven dimensions of satisfaction (admission, nursing and daily care, medical care, information, hospital environment and ancillary staff, overall quality of care and services, recommendations/intentions). Patient satisfaction and complaints were treated as dependent variables in multivariate ordinal polychotomous and dichotomous logistic stepwise regressions, respectively. Patient sociodemographic, health and stay characteristics as well as organization/ activity of service were used as independent variables. The two strongest predictors of satisfaction for all dimensions were older age and better self-perceived health status at admission. Men tended to be more satisfied than women. Other predictors specific for certain dimensions of satisfaction were: married, Karnofsky index more than 70, critical/serious self-reported condition at admission, emergency admission, choice of hospital by her/himself, stay in a medical service, stay in a private room, length of stay less than one week, stay in a service with a mean length of stay longer than one week. The factors associated with inpatient satisfaction elucidated in this study may be helpful in interpreting patient satisfaction scores when comparing hospitals, services or time periods, in targeting patient groups at risk of worse experiences and in focusing care quality programs.

CHAPTER - IV

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Research can be defined as scientific and systematic search for pertinent information on a specific topic. Research is an art of scientific investigation. In short, the search for knowledge through objective and systematic method of finding solution to a problem is research.

Research methods may be understood as all those methods that are used for the conduction of research. Research methodology is a way to systematically solve a research problem. It may be understood as a science of studying how research is done scientifically.

4.1. AREA OF RESEARCH

The research was confined to the patients admitted in different ward areas (General ward, Special-General ward, Semi-Private ward, Private ward) at Global Hospitals and Health City. The research period was about three months. The research was conducted to study the customer satisfaction towards In-patient services at Global Hospitals & Health City. The main area of this research is to assess the satisfaction level of customers towards various services offered by the hospital.

4.2. RESEARCH DESIGN

A research design is the arrangement of conditions for collection and analysis of data in a manner that aims to combine relevance to research purpose with economy in procedure. It constitutes the blueprint for collection, measurement and analysis of data. Research design is needed because it facilitates the smooth sailing of research operations thereby making the research as efficient as possible yielding maximum information with minimal expenditure of effort, time and money.

The research design used in this study is descriptive research. Descriptive research is used to obtain information concerning the current status of the phenomenon to describe “what exists” with respect to variables or conditions in a situation. The methods involved range from the survey which describes the status quo and the correlation study which investigates the relationship between the variables to developmental studies which seek to determine changes over time.

Steps in descriptive research include:

Statement of the problem

Identification of information needed to solve the problem

Selection or development of instrument for gathering information

Identification of target population and determination of sampling procedure

Design of procedure for information collection

Collection of information

Analysis of information

Generalization and/or predictions

4.3.SOURCES OF DATA

The task of data collection begins after a research problem has been defined and research design/plan checked out. Data collection involves two types of data. They are:

(i)Primary data

(ii)Secondary data

Primary data are those which are collected afresh and for the first time, and thus happen to be original in character. A primary data collection is done either by observation, interview or questionnaire and this happens to be original in character. In this study, the primary data is collected through questionnaire. A standard questionnaire was designed to collect data from the target samples (In-patients at Global Hospitals and Health City).

Secondary data are those which have already been collected by someone else and which have already been passed through the statistical process. For this study, information was also collected from various books, journals, research studies, articles and internet.

4.4 PERIOD OF STUDY

The study was conducted for about three months (1st April 2013 to 30th June 2013) among Patients admitted in various wards at Global Hospitals & Health city

4.5. SAMPLE SIZE

The sample size chosen for this study is 104.

4.6. SAMPLING TECHNIQUE

The sampling procedure involved in this study is convenient sampling. There are different sampling techniques to select samples from the population. In this study, the most appropriate one was convenient sampling, since the target people were less. But the data collected would be suitable and reliable for the study.

4.7. STATISTICAL TOOLS

The statistical tools include:

(i) Percentage Analysis:

Percentage is a kind of ratio analysis. Percentages are used in making comparison between two or more series of data. Percentage describes relationship. It can also be used to compare the relative terms of distribution of two or more series of data.

 

Number of responses

Percentage of respondents =

--------------------------- x 100

 

Total No. of Samples

(ii) Weighted Average:

An average in which each quantity to be averaged is assigned a weight. These weightings determine the relative importance of each quantity on the average. Weightings are the equivalent of having that many like items with the same value involved in the average.

No. of responses x Sum of weights

Weighted Average = -------------------------------------------

Total No. of Samples

(iii) Correlation:

Correlation is one of the most common and most useful statistics. A correlation is a single number that describes the degree of relationship between two variables. It is

often measured as Correlation coefficient indicating the strength and directions of a

linear relationship between two random samples.

=

∑

−∑ ∑

(∑ −(∑

) )(∑ −(∑ ) )

 

(iv) Chi - square Analysis:

A chi-square test (also chi-squared or χ2 test) is any statistical hypothesis test in which the sampling distribution of the test statistic is a chi-square distribution when the null hypothesis is true, or any in which this is asymptotically true, meaning that the sampling distribution (if the null hypothesis is true) can be made to approximate a chi-square distribution as closely as desired by making the sample size large enough.

4.8. PILOT STUDY

Pilot study is a small trial run of the questionnaire for the main study. It is a good practice to conduct pilot study so that errors in the design of questionnaires or difficulties for interviewers can be identified and corrected. It gives the researcher an opportunity to fine tune his/her questionnaire and conduct the survey in an effective manner. During this phase of the investigation, it may be noted that some of the questions are misunderstood and therefore the questions need an amendment. For this research, the pilot study was conducted with a sample of five In-Patients. The mistakes found were corrected and altered accordingly and the corrected questionnaires were used in the final study. The final study was conducted with a sample of 104 In-Patients at Global Hospitals and Health City.

CHAPTER – IV

ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

I. PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS

TABLE – 5.1

GENDER OF RESPONDENTS

Sl. No.

Gender

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

 

1

Male

66

37%

 

 

 

 

2

Female

88

63%

 

 

 

 

 

Total

104

100

 

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:

The above table shows that 63% of the respondents are Females and 37% of the respondents are Male

CHART - 1

GENDER OF RESPONDENTS

37%

MALE

FEMALE

63%

TABLE – 5.2

AGE OF THE RESPONDENTS

Sl. No.

Age Group

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

 

1

< 20 years

05

5%

 

 

 

 

2

21-39 years

31

30%

 

 

 

 

3

41-59 years

46

44%

 

 

 

 

4

60 & above

22

21%

 

 

 

 

 

Total

104

100

 

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:

The above table indicates that 21% of respondents are above 60 years, 44% of them are between the age group of 41-59 years, 30% of them are between the age group of 21-39 years, 5% of them are less than 20 years.

CHART - 2

AGE OF THE RESPONDENTS

5%

21%

< 20 Years

30%

21-39 Years

41-59 Years

> 60 Years

44%

TABLE – 5.3

MARITAL STATUS OF THE RESPONDENTS

Sl. No.

Marital Status

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

 

1

Married

86

83%

 

 

 

 

2

Unmarried

18

17%

 

 

 

 

 

Total

100

100

 

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:

The above table shows that 17% of the respondents are Unmarried and 83% of the respondents are married.

CHART - 3

MARITAL STATUS OF THE RESPONDENTS

17%

MARRIED

UNMARRIED

83%

TABLE – 5.4

EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION OF THE RESPONDENTS

Sl. No.

Educational Qualification

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

 

1

Illiterate

9

9%

 

 

 

 

2

Diploma

26

25%

 

 

 

 

3

Graduate

48

46%

 

 

 

 

4

Postgraduate

21

20%

 

 

 

 

 

Total

100

100

 

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:

The above table represents that 20% are Postgraduate, 46% are Graduate, 25% are Diploma and 9% are Illiterate.

CHART – 4

EDUC ATIONAL QUALIFICATION OF THE RESPONDENTS

9%

20%

25%

ILLETERATE

 

 

DIPLOMA

 

GRAGUATE

 

P.G

46%

TABLE – 5.5

OCCUPATION OF THE RESPONDENTS

Sl. No.

Occupation

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

 

1

Student

11

10%

 

 

 

 

2

Employed

32

31%

 

 

 

 

3

Unemployed

32

31%

 

 

 

 

4

Business

18

17%

 

 

 

 

5

Retired

11

11%

 

 

 

 

 

Total

100

100

 

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:

The above table indicates that 11% of the respondents are retired, 17% of the respondents are doing business, 31% of the respondents are unemployed, 31% of the respondents are employed, and 10% of the respondents are students.

CHART – 5

OCCUPATION OF THE RESPONDENTS

35%

31%

31%

30%

25%

20%

 

Student

17%

 

Employed

 

 

Unemployed

15%

 

Business

 

 

1 1%

Retired

10%

 

 

 

 

10%

 

 

5%

0%

Student

Em ployed

Unemployed

Business

Retired

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE – 5.6

ANNUAL FAMILY INCOME OF THE RESPONDENTS

Sl. No.

Annual Income

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

 

 

1

< 100000

9

9%

 

 

 

 

2

100001 – 300000

32

31%

 

 

 

 

3

300001 – 500000

38

36%

 

 

 

 

4

> 500000

25

24%

 

 

 

 

 

Total

100

100

 

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:

The above table shows that the annual family income of 24% of the respondents is

> 500000, 36% of the respondents earn a family income of 300001 – 500000, and 31% of the respondents between 100001 and 300000 and 9% of the respondents are in the income group of < 100000.

40%

35%

30%

25%

20%

15%

10%

5%

0%

CHART – 6

AN NUAL FAMILY INCOME OF THE RESPONDENTS

36%

31%

24%

9%

< 100000

100001 - 300000

300001 - 500000

> 500000

TABLE -5.7

SATISFACTION TOWARDS INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE

ADMISSION STAFF

Criteria

 

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

 

Yes

 

99

95%

 

 

 

 

No

 

5

5%

 

 

 

 

Total

 

104

100

 

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

 

 

Interpretation:

The above table indicates that 95% of respondents were satisfied with the information provided by admission staff and only 5% of respondents were not satisfied with the information provided by admission staff.

CHART – 7

SATISFACTION TO WARDS INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE ADMISS ION STAFF

5%

Yes

No

95%

TABLE – 5.8

SATISFACTION OF PATIENTS TOWARDS ATTITUDE AND

SUPPORTIVENESS OF NURSING STAFF

Criteria

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

Yes

102

98%

 

 

 

No

2

2%

 

 

 

Total

104

100

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

 

 

Interpretation:

The above table represents that 98% of the respondents are satisfied with the attitude and Supportiveness of nursing staffs and only 2% are not satisfied with the same.

CHART – 8

SATISFACTION OF PATIENTS TOWARDS ATTITUDE AND SUPPORTIVENESS OF NURSING STAFF

2%

Yes

No

98%

TABLE – 5.9

RESPONSIVENESS AND TIME SPENT BY THE DOCTORS IN ACTIVE

PATIENT CARE

Criteria

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

Yes

99

95%

 

 

 

No

5

5%

 

 

 

Total

104

100

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

 

 

Interpretation:

The above table shows that 95% of the respondents are satisfied with the responsiveness and time spent by the doctors in active patient care and only 5% of the respondents are not satisfied with the same.

CHART - 9

RESPONSIVENESS AND TIME SPENT BY THE DOCTORS IN ACTIVE PATIENT CARE

5%

Yes

No

95%

TABLE – 5.10

RESPONSIVENESS OF THE DOCTORS AND NURSES TO THE PATIENTS’

CONCERNS AND COMPLAINTS

Criteria

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

Yes

103

99%

 

 

 

No

1

1%

 

 

 

Total

104

100

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

 

 

Interpretation:

The above table indicates that 99% of the respondents said that Doctors and Nurses respond well to their concerns and complaints and only 1% of respondents said that Doctors and Nurses do not respond well.

CHART - 10

RESPONSIVENESS OF THE DO CTORS AND NURSES TO THE PATIENTS’ CONCER NS AND COMPLAINTS

Percentage

 

99%

100%

 

90%

 

80%

 

70%

 

60%

 

50%

 

40%

 

30%

 

20%

1%

10%

 

0%

 

Yes

No

TABLE – 5.11

HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS’ RESPECT TOWARDS THE PATIENTS’ RIGHT TO PRIVACY

Criteria

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

Yes

103

99%

 

 

 

No

1

1%

 

 

 

Total

104

100

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

 

 

Interpretation:

The above table represents that 99% of the respondents are satisfied with the privacy provided by the health care providers and only 1% of the respondents are not satisfied with the same.

CHART – 11

HEALTH CARE PROVI DERS’ RESPECT TOWARDS THE PATIENTS’ RIGHT TO PRIVACY

120%

100%

99 %

80%

60%

40%

20%

1 %

0%

Yes

No

TABLE – 5.12

ATTENTION AND CARE PROVIDED BY THE LAB AND RADIOLOGY STAFF DURING PROCEDURES

Criteria

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

Yes

103

99%

 

 

 

No

1

1%

 

 

 

Total

104

100

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

 

 

Interpretation:

The above table indicates that 99% of the respondents are satisfied with the attention and care provided by the lab and radiology staff during procedures and only 1% of the respondents are not satisfied with the same.

CHART – 12

ATTENTION AND CARE PROVIDED BY THE LAB AND RADIOLOGY STAFF DUR ING PROCEDURES

1%

Ye

s

99%

TABLE – 5.13

INVOLVEMENT OF THE PATIENTS IN TREATMENT DECISIONS OFFERED BY THE DOCTORS

Criteria

No.0f Respondents

Percentage (%)

 

 

 

Yes

99

95%

 

 

 

No

5

5%

 

 

 

Total

104

100

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

 

 

Interpretation:

The above table shows that 95% of the respondents said that Doctors are involving patients in their treatment decision and only 5% of the respondents said that Doctors are not involving them in their treatment decision

CHART – 13

INVOLVEMENT OF THE PATIENTS IN TREATMENT DECISIONS OFFERED BY THE DOCTORS

100%

90%

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

95%

 

 

5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yes

No

Yes

No

TABLE – 5.14

SATISFACTION TOWARDS COURTESY SHOWN BY THE

SUPPORTIVE STAFF

Criteria

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

Yes

102

98%

 

 

 

No

2

2%

 

 

 

Total

104

100

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

 

 

Interpretation:

The above table represents that 98% of the respondents are satisfied with the courtesy shown by supportive staff and only 2% are not satisfied with the courtesy shown by the supportive staff.

CHART – 14

SATISFACTION TOWARDS COURTESY SHOWN BY THE SUPPORTIVE STAFF

2%

98%

Yes

No

TABLE – 5.15

REGULARITY OF THE GUEST RELATION STAFFS’ VISIT AND THEIR

RESPONSIVENESS TO PATIENTS’ COMPLAINTS

Criteria

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

Yes

104

100%

 

 

 

No

Nil

Nil

 

 

 

Total

100

100

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

 

 

Interpretation:

The above table indicates that 100% of the respondents are satisfied with the regularity of the guest relation staffs’ visit and their responsiveness to patients’ complaints.

CHART – 15

REGULARITY OF THE GUEST RELAT ION STAFFS’ VISIT AND THEIR RESPONSIVENESS TO PATIENTS’ COMPLAINTS

100%

90%

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

100%

0%

Yes

N0

Yes

N0

TABLE – 5.16

INFORMATION RECEIVED BY THE PATIENTS ABOUT THEIR CONDITION AND TREATMENT FROM HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS

Criteria

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

Adequate

81

78%

 

 

 

Inadequate

23

22%

 

 

 

Total

100

100

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

 

 

Interpretation:

The above table indicates that 78% of the respondents said that the information received about their condition and treatment is adequate and 22% of the respondents were of the view that they do not receive adequate information about their condition and treatment.

CHART – 16

INFORMATION RECEIVED BY T HE PATIENTS ABOUT THEIR CONDITION AND TRE ATMENT FROM HEALTH

CARE PROVIDERS

90%

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

78%

22%

Adequate

Inadequate

Adequate

Inadequate

TABLE- 5.17

PATIENTS’ OPINION ABOUT CLEANLINESS AND COMFORT OF STAY IN VARIOUS WARDS

 

General Ward

Special General Ward

Semi-Private Ward

Private Ward

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Criteria

No.of.respondents

Percentage

No.of.respondents

Percentage

No.of.respondents

Percentage

No.of.respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Good

6

23%

9

35%

16

61%

23

88%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good

9

35%

10

38%

9

35%

3

12%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Satisfactory

8

31%

7

27%

1

4%

Nil

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poor

3

11%

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Poor

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

26

100

26

100

26

100

26

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: primary data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interpretation:

The above table shows that 88% of respondents from Private Ward rated as Very Good, where as only 23% of the respondents from General Ward rated it as Very Good towards cleanliness and comfort of stay at Global Hospitals & Health city

CHART - 17

PATIENTS’ OPINION AB OUT CLEANLINESS AND COMFORT OF STAY IN V ARIOUS WARDS

88%

90%

80%

70%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

61%

 

 

 

 

 

 

60%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Good

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

40%

35%

38%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Satisfactory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poor

35%

 

35%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30%

31%

27%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Poor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11%

 

 

 

12%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10%

 

 

 

4%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0%

0% 0%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0% 0%

0% 0% 0%

 

 

 

 

0%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Ward

Special-General Ward

Semi-Private Ward

Private Ward

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE – 5.17

LEVEL OF SATISFACTION RATED BY THE PATIENTS IN VARIOUS WARDS DURING

THEIR STAY IN HOSPITAL

 

General Ward

Special General Ward

Semi-Private Ward

Private Ward

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Criteria

No.of.respondents

Percentage

No.of.respondents

Percentage

No.of.respondents

Percentage

No.of.respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Good

9

34%

11

42%

17

65%

20

77%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good

15

58%

13

50%

9

35%

6

23%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Satisfactory

2

8%

2

8%

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poor

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Poor

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

26

100

26

100

26

100

26

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: primary data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interpretation:

The above table indicates that the77% of the respondents from Private ward rated the level of satisfaction as Very Good, where as only 34% of the respondents from General Ward rated the level of satisfaction is Very Good.

CHART - 17

LEVEL OF SATISFA CTION RATED BY THE PATIENTS IN VARIOUS WAR DS DURING

THEIR STAY IN HOSPITAL

80%

 

 

 

 

77%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

70%

 

 

 

65%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

60%

58%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50%

 

 

 

 

50%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

42 %

 

 

 

 

40%

34%

 

 

35%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23%

 

20%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10%

8%

8%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0%

0%

 

0%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Ward

Special General Ward

Semi-Private Ward

Private Ward

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Good

Good

Satisfactory

Poor

Very poor

TABLE – 5.19

CUSTOMERS OPINION ABOUT COST OF CONSULTATION

Sl. No

Criteria

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

 

1

Too high

69

66%

 

 

 

 

2

Reasonable

34

33%

 

 

 

 

3

Too low

1

1%

 

 

 

 

 

Total

104

100

 

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:

The above table shows that 66% of respondents perceived the cost of consultation as Too high, 33% of the respondents perceived it as Reasonable and only 1% of the respondents felt that the cost of consultation is Too low.

CHART - 19

CUSTOM ERS OPENINON ABOUT COST OF CONSULTATION

70%

 

60%

 

50%

 

 

66%

40%

 

30%

 

20%

33%

 

10%

 

1%

0%

Too high

Reasonable

Too low

TABLE – 5.20

PERCEPTION ABOUT THE COST OF TREATMENT

Sl. No

Criteria

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

 

1

Too high

71

68%

 

 

 

 

2

Reasonable

33

32%

 

 

 

 

3

Too low

Nil

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

Total

104

100

 

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:

The above table depicts that 68% of respondents said that the cost of treatment is Too high and 22% said that the cost of treatment is Reasonable.

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

CHART - 20

PE RCEPTION ABOUT THE COST OF TREATMENT

68%

Too high

Reasonable

32%

Too low

Nil

Too high

Reasonable

Too low

TABLE - 21

AFFORDABILITY OF THE BED CHARGES

Sl. No

Criteria

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

 

1

Too high

78

75%

 

 

 

 

2

Reasonable

25

24%

 

 

 

 

3

Too low

1

1%

 

 

 

 

 

Total

104

100

 

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:

The above table shows that 75% of the respondents said that the bed charges are Too high, 24% of respondents said that the bed charges are Reasonable, and only 1% of respondents said that bed charges are Too low.

CHART - 21

AFFORDABILITY OF THE BED CHARGES

80%

75%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

24%

20%

10%

1%

0%

Too high

Reasonable

Too low

Too high

Reasonable Too low

TABLE – 5.22

PERCEPTION ABOUT THE COST OF DIAGNOSTIC SERVICES

Sl. No

Criteria

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

 

1

Too high

71

68%

 

 

 

 

2

Reasonable

33

32%

 

 

 

 

3

Too low

Nil

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

Total

104

100

 

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:

The above table indicates that 68% of the respondents perceived that the cost of diagnostics is Too high and 32% of the respondents perceived that the cost of diagnostics is Reasonable.

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

CHART – 22

PERCEP TION ABOUT THE COST OF DIAGNOSTIC SERVICE S

68%

32%

Too high

Reasonable

Too low

0%

Too high

Reasonable

Too low

TABLE – 5.23

REASONABILITY OF THE HOSPITAL CHARGES BASED ON THE QUALITY OF SERVICES OFFERED

Sl. No

Criteria

No.0f Respondents

Percentage

 

 

 

 

1

Too high

62

60%

 

 

 

 

2

Reasonable

42

40%

 

 

 

 

3

Too low

Nil

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

Total

104

100

 

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:

The above table represent that 60% of respondents said that the hospital charges are Too high with respect to the quality of services offered and 40% of respondents said that the hospital charges are Reasonable based on the quality of services offered.

CHART – 23

REASONABILITY OF THE HOSPITAL CHARGES BASED ON THE QUALITY OF SERVICES OFFERED

60%

70%

60%

40%

50%

40%

Too high

Reasonable

Too low

30%

 

 

20%

 

 

10%

 

0%

 

 

0%

 

 

Too high

Reasonable

Too low

II. WEIGHTED AVERAGE

TABLE – 5.24

SATISFACTION OF IN-PATIENTS REGARDING MEDICAL AND

SUPPORTIVE SERVICES PROVIDED AT

GLOBAL HOSPITALS & HEALTH CITY

PARAMETERS

VERY GOOD

 

GOOD 4

SATISFACTORY 3

POOR 2

VERY POOR 1

WEIGHTED AVERAGE

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medical services

 

89

12

2

1

0

4.81

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nursing services

 

90

11

2

1

0

4.82

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diagnostic services

 

74

24

3

3

0

4.62

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dietary services

 

34

27

20

20

3

3.66

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Housekeeping services

 

85

14

4

1

0

4.76

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Primary data

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interpretation:-

The above table indicates that the respondents have given the highest weight of 4.82 for Nursing Services and average weight of 3.66 for Dietary Services.

CHART – 24

SATISFACTION OF IN-PATIENT S REGARDING MEDICAL AND SUPPORTIVE SERVICES PROVIDED AT GLOBAL

HOSPITALS & HEALTH CITY

Weighted Average

6

 

4.81

4.82

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.62

 

4.76

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

3.66

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medical Mervices

Nursing Services

Diagnostic services

Dietary Services

Houskeepin g Services

 

 

In-Patient Services

Medical Mervices

Nursing Services

Diagnostic services

Dietary Services Houskeeping Services

TABLE – 5.25

SATISFACTION OF IN-PATIENTS REGARDING ANCILLARY SERVICES

PROVIDED AT

GLOBAL HOSPITALS & HEALTH CITY

PARAMETERS

VERY GOOD

5

GOOD 4

SATISFACTOR Y 3

POOR 2

VERY POOR 1

WEIGHTED AVERAGE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transportation system

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(stretcher/wheel chair)

 

80

17

4

3

0

4.67

promptness

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Billing services

 

36

14

35

15

4

3.60

(Explanation and counseling)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Admission services

 

82

17

4

1

0

4.73

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Infrastructural facilities

 

83

17

4

0

0

4.75

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interpretation:-

The above table indicates that the respondents have given the highest weight of 4.75 for Infrastructure facilities and average weight of 3.60 for Billing Services.

CHART - 25

Weighted Average

SATISFACTION OF IN-PATIENTS REGARDING ANCILLARY SERVICE S PROVIDED AT

GLOBAL HOSPITALS & HEALTH CITY

5

 

4.67

4.73

4.75

 

 

 

 

4.5

4

3.6

3.5

3

2.5

2

1.5

1

0.5

0

Transportation system

Billing services

Admission services

Infrastructural facilities

In-Patient Services

Transportation system

Billing services

Admission services Infrastructural facilities

CHART – 26

SATISFACTION OF IN-PATIENTS REGARDING VARIOUS SERVICES PROVIDED AT

GLOBAL HOSPITALS & HELATH CITY

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

4.82

 

 

 

 

 

4.81

4.62

4.76

4.67

4.73

4.75

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.66

 

3. 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medical

Nursing Services Dia gnostic

Dietary Services Housekeeping

Transportation Billing system

Admission

Infrastructure

Services

Se rvices

services

System

Services

Facilities

III. COEFFICENT OF CORRELATION ANALYSIS

TABLE- 5.26

Coefficient of correlation between medical services and overall satisfaction derived from various services at Global Hospitals & Health City.

X denotes Medical services

Y denotes overall satisfaction derived from various services

Parameter

X

Y

XY

X2

Y2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Good

89

57

5073

7921

3249

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good

12

43

516

144

1849

 

 

 

 

 

 

satisfactory

2

4

8

4

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poor

1

0

0

1

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Poor

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

104

104

5597

8070

5114

 

 

 

 

 

 

r =

 

 

∑

∑

 

(∑

∑(∑

) )(∑

(∑ ) )

 

Correlation Value = 0.82

Interpretation:

The table indicates the positive correlation. There is a positive correlation between Medical services and overall satisfaction derived from various services at Global Hospitals & Health City.

TABLE – 5.27

Correlation between nursing services and overall satisfaction derived from various services at Global Hospitals & Health City.

X denotes the nursing services

Y denotes the overall satisfaction derived from various services

Parameter

 

X

 

Y

XY

 

 

X2

Y2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Good

 

90

 

57

5130

 

 

8100

3249

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good

 

11

 

43

473

 

 

121

1849

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

satisfactory

 

2

 

4

8

 

 

4

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poor

 

1

 

0

0

 

 

1

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Poor

 

0

 

0

0

 

 

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

104

 

104

5611

 

 

8226

5114

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

r =

 

 

∑

∑

 

 

 

 

(∑

∑(∑

) )(∑

(∑ ) )

 

 

 

 

 

 

Correlation Value = 0.81

Interpretation:

The table indicates the positive correlation. There is a positive correlation between Nursing services and Overall satisfaction derived from various services at Global Hospitals & Health City

TABLE – 5.28

Correlation between dietary services and overall satisfaction derived from various services at Global Hospitals & Health City

X denotes Dietary services

Y denotes and overall satisfaction derived from various services

Parameter

X

 

Y

 

 

XY

 

 

X2

Y2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Good

34

 

57

 

 

1938

 

 

1156

3249

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good

27

 

43

 

 

1161

 

 

728

1849

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

satisfactory

20

 

4

 

 

80

 

 

400

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poor

20

 

0

 

 

0

 

 

400

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Poor

3

 

0

 

 

0

 

 

9

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

104

 

104

 

 

3178

 

 

2693

5114

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

r =

 

 

 

∑

∑

 

 

 

 

 

(∑

∑(∑

) )(∑

(∑ ) )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Correlation Value = 0.81

Interpretation:

The table indicates the positive correlation. There is a positive correlation between Dietary services and Overall satisfaction derived from various services at Global Hospitals & Health City

TABLE – 5.29

Correlation between billing services and overall satisfaction derived from various services at Global Hospitals & Health City

X denotes Billing services

Y denotes overall satisfaction derived from various services

Parameter

X

 

 

Y

 

XY

 

X2

Y2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Good

36

 

 

57

 

2052

 

1296

3249

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good

14

 

 

43

 

602

 

196

1849

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

satisfactory

35

 

 

4

 

140

 

1225

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poor

15

 

 

0

 

0

 

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Poor

4

 

 

0

 

0

 

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

104

 

 

104

 

2794

 

2717

5114

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

r =

 

 

 

 

∑ ∑

 

 

 

 

 

(∑

∑(∑

) )(∑

(∑ ) )

 

 

 

 

Correlation Value = 0.41

Interpretation:

The table indicates the positive correlation. There is a positive correlation between Dietary services and Overall satisfaction derived from various services at Global Hospitals & Health City

TABLE – 5.30

Correlation between infrastructural facilities and overall satisfaction derived from various services at Global Hospitals & Health City

X denotes infrastructural facilities

Y denotes overall satisfaction derived from various services

Parameter

X

Y

XY

X2

Y2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Good

83

57

4731

6889

3249

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good

17

43

731

289

1849

 

 

 

 

 

 

satisfactory

4

4

16

16

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poor

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Poor

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

104

104

5478

7194

5114

 

 

 

 

 

 

r =

 

 

∑

∑

 

(∑

∑(∑

) )(∑

(∑ ) )

 

Correlation Value = 0.86

Interpretation:

The table indicates the positive correlation. There is a positive correlation between infrastructural facilities and Overall satisfaction derived from various services at Global Hospitals & Health City

IV. CHI-SQUARE ANALYSIS

TABLE – 5.31

OVERALL SATISFACTION DERIVED FROM VARIOUS SERVICES AMONG

GENDER

Observed Frequency Table

Gender

Very Good

Good

Satisfactory

Poor

Very Poor

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Male

36

27

3

0

0

66

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Female

21

16

1

0

0

38

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

57

43

4

0

0

104

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

H0 – There is no significant association between overall of satisfaction and Gender H1 – There is a significant association between overall satisfaction and Gender.

Calculated value of Chi-square = 17.98

4 degrees of freedom @ 5% level of significance is 9.488

Therefore calculated value of chi-square is greater than the table value of chi-square.

Interpretation:

Hence H0 is rejected. Therefore there is a significant association between overall satisfaction and Gender.

TABLE – 5.32

OVERALL SATISFACTION DERIVED FROM VARIOUS SERVICES AMONG AGE

Observed Frequency Table

Age

Very Good

Good

Satisfactory

Poor

Very poor

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

< 20 Years

2

2

1

0

0

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21 – 40 Years

13

16

2

0

0

31

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

41 – 60 Years

25

20

1

0

0

46

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

> 61 Years

17

5

0

0

0

22

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

57

43

4

0

0

104

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HO – There is no significant association between overall of satisfaction and Age H1 – There is a significant association between overall satisfaction and Age

Calculated value of Chi-square = 14.47

12 degrees of freedom @ 5% level of significance is 21.026

Therefore calculated value of chi-square is greater than the table value of chi-square.

Interpretation:

Hence H0 is accepted. Therefore there is no significant association between overall of satisfaction and Age.

TABLE – 5.33

OVERALL SATISFACTION DERIVED FROM VARIOUS SERVICES AMONG

EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION

Observed Frequency Table

Education

Very Good

Good

Satisfactory

Poor

Very poor

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Illiterate

4

5

0

0

0

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diploma

14

10

1

0

0

26

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graduate

27

19

2

0

0

48

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Postgraduate

11

9

1

0

0

21

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

57

43

4

0

0

104

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HO – There is no significant association between overall of satisfaction and educational qualification

H1 – There is a significant association between overall satisfaction and educational qualification

Calculated value of Chi-square = 1.63

12 degrees of freedom @ 5% level of significance is 21.026

Therefore calculated value of chi-square is greater than the table value of chi-square.

Interpretation:

Hence H0 is accepted. Therefore there is no significant association between overall of satisfaction and educational qualification.

TABLE – 5.34

OVERALL SATISFACTION DERIVED FROM VARIOUS SERVICES AMONG

OCCUPATION

Observed Frequency Table

Occupation

Very Good

Good

Satisfactory

Poor

Very poor

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Student

7

4

0

0

0

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Employed

17

13

2

0

0

32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unemployed

15

16

1

0

0

32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Business

11

6

1

0

0

18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Retired

7

4

0

0

0

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

57

43

4

0

0

104

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HO – There is no significant association between overall of satisfaction and occupation. H1 – There is a significant association between overall satisfaction and occupation.

Calculated value of Chi-square = 3.32

12 degrees of freedom @ 5% level of significance is 26.296

Therefore calculated value of chi-square is greater than the table value of chi-square.

Interpretation:

Hence H0 is accepted. Therefore there is no significant association between overall of satisfaction and occupation.

TABLE – 5.35

OVERALL SATISFACTION DERIVED FROM VARIOUS SERVICES AMONG

ANNUAL INCOME

Observed Frequency Table

Annual Income

Very Good

Good

Satisfactory

Poor

Very poor

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

< 100000

3

5

1

0

0

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100001 – 300000

19

13

0

0

0

32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

300001 – 500000

21

16

1

0

0

38

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

>500000

14

9

2

0

0

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

57

43

4

0

0

104

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HO – There is no significant association between overall of satisfaction and annual income H1 – There is a significant association between overall satisfaction and annual income

Calculated value of Chi-square = 24.24

12 degrees of freedom @ 5% level of significance is 21.026

Therefore calculated value of chi-square is greater than the table value of chi-square.

Interpretation:

Hence H0 is rejected. Therefore there is significant association between overall of satisfaction and annual income.

CHAPTER - IV

FINDINGS

1.There are 95 Percent of respondents who were satisfied with the information provided by admission staff and 5 Percent of respondents were not satisfied with the information provided by admission staff

2.There are 98 Percent of the respondents who are satisfied with the attitude and supportiveness of nursing staff and only 2 Percent are not satisfied with the same.

3.There are 95 Percent of the respondents who are satisfied with the responsiveness and time spent by the doctors in active patient care and 5 Percent of the respondents are not satisfied with the same.

4.There are 99 Percent of the respondents who felt that Doctors and Nurses were responding well on concerns and complaints and only 1 Percent of respondents were felt that Doctors and Nurses are not responding well.

5.There are 99 Percent of the respondents who are satisfied with privacy provided by the health care providers and only 1 Percent of the respondents are not satisfied with the same.

6.There are 99 Percent of the respondents who are satisfied with the attention and care provided by the lab and radiology staff during procedures and only 1 Percent of the respondent is no satisfied with the same.

7.There are 95 Percent of the respondents who are satisfied for involving them in treatment decision and 5 Percent are no satisfied with the same.

8.There are 98 Percent of the respondents who are satisfied with the courtesy shown by supportive staff and only 2 Percent are not satisfied with the courtesy shown by the supportive staff.

9.There are 100 Percent of the respondents who said that guest relations staffs are regularly visiting and they are responsive to the patients’ complaints.

10.There are 78 Percent of the respondents satisfied with the information received about their condition and treatment and 22 Percent of the respondents are dissatisfied with the same.

11.There are 88 Percent of respondents from Private Ward who rated cleanliness and comfort of stay as Very Good; where as only 23 Percent of the respondents from General Ward rated it as Very Good.

12.There are 77 Percent of the respondents from Private ward rating the level of satisfaction as Very Good, where as only 34 Percent of the respondents from General Ward rated the level of satisfaction is Very Good.

13.There are 66 Percent of respondents who felt that cost of consultation is Too high, 33 Percent of the respondents found it Reasonable and only 1 Percent of the respondents felt it as Too low.

14.There are 68 Percent of respondents who perceived that the cost of treatment is too high and 22 Percent are perceived that the cost of treatment is Reasonable.

15.There are 75 Percent of the respondents who said that the bed charges are Too high, 24 Percent of respondents said that the bed charges are Reasonable, and only 1 Percent of respondents said that bed charges are Too low.

16.There are 68 Percent of the respondents who perceived that that cost of diagnostics is Too high and 32 Percent of the respondents perceived that the cost of diagnostics is Reasonable.

17.There are 60 Percent of respondents who said that the hospital charges based on quality of services offered is Too high and 40 Percent of respondents said that the hospital charges based on quality of services offered is Reasonable.

18.Medical Services were given the highest weightage and Dietary Services were given the average weightage by the respondents among Medical and Supportive Services.

19.Infrastructure facilities were given the highest weightage and Billing Services were given the average weightage by the respondents among ancillary Services.

20.There is a positive correlation between Medical services and overall satisfaction derived from various services.

21.There is a positive correlation between Nursing services and Overall satisfaction derived from various services.

22.There is a positive correlation between Dietary services and Overall satisfaction derived from various services.

23.There is a positive correlation between Dietary services and Overall satisfaction derived from various services.

24.There is a positive correlation between infrastructural facilities and Overall satisfaction derived from various services.

25.Based on Chi-Square Analysis there is a significant association between overall satisfaction and Gender.

26.Based on Chi-Square Analysis there is no significant association between overall of satisfaction and Age.

27.Based on Chi-Square Analysis there is no significant association between overall of satisfaction and educational qualification

28.Based on Chi-Square Analysis there is no significant association between overall of satisfaction and occupation.

29.Based on Chi-Square Analysis there is significant association between overall of satisfaction and annual income.

CHAPTER - VII

SUGGESTION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

1.Dietary services should be improved in terms of quality, taste and time of serving.

2.Billing counseling should be given to all patients

3.Make it a routine to give a copy of patients Right and Responsibilities to all the patients at the time of admission.

4.Try to avoid noise pollution and disturbance in General wards.

5.Housekeeping services like cleaning toilets, floor etc. Should be considered as apriority to improve the satisfaction.

6.Adequate spacing should be given between the beds in general wards

7.Toilet space.

8.Change the screens in General and Special General wards every three days

9.Reduce the time lagging between sample collection and report delivery.

10.Try to avoid delay in transportation services within the hospital.

11.Maintain adequate Housekeeping staffs, especially in the Night time.

12.Patients should be provided with adequate information regarding their condition and treatment.

13.Bed charges and Cost of treatment can be reduced to a considerable extent.

14.Patient feedback should be collected without fail so as to know the areas to be improved to maximize the customer satisfaction.

15.Patients Rights and Responsibilities chart can be displayed in wards even in local language also.

CHAPTER – VIII

CONCLUSION

Assessing satisfaction of patients is simple and cost effective way for evaluation of hospital services. The findings of the present study carried out for assessing satisfaction of patients admitted in Global Hospitals & Health City reveal patients were more satisfied with attentiveness of doctors, response to complaints by the Doctors and Nurses. Most of the patients were satisfied regarding medical and nursing services in the hospital and most of the patients in General wards were dissatisfied regarding cleanliness in wards and toilets. Half of the patients were dissatisfied with quality of food and few patients with billing counseling in the hospital. 3/4th of admitted patients during the study period were satisfied with services available in the hospital.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Books:

1.Anne - marie nelson, Stven D.wood, Stephen w.brown. Improving Patient Satisfaction Now

2.Balaji. B, Services Marketing and Management, Third Edition, S. Chand & Co, New Delhi

3.Carol J. Grove, Patient Satisfaction Instruments: A Compendium by American Physical Therapy Association

4.Irwin Press, Patient satisfaction. Understanding and Managing the Experience of Care

5.John E. Ware Jr, Mary K. Snyder, W.Russell Wright, Allyson R. Davies. Defining and Measuring Patient Satisfaction with Medical Care

6.Kunders. G.D., How to market your Hospital without your Philisophy, 1999, First Edition, Prism Books Pvt.Ltd, Banglore.

7.Kothari. C.R, Research Methodology: Methods and Techniques, 2007 Edition, New Age Publications.

8.Roberta L. Messner, Susan Jane Lewis, Increasing Patient Satisfaction: A Guide for Nurses.

9.Ravi Lochanan, Research Methodology. Margham Publications.

10.Tuan D. Nguyen, C.Clifford Attkisson, Bruce L. Stegner. Assessment of Patient Satisfaction

11.Vittal. P.R. Business Statistics and Operations Research, Margham Publication.

12.Wendy Leebov, Michael Vergare, and Gail Scott. Patient Satisfaction: A Guide to Practice Enhancemen

Journals:

1.American Journal of Managed Care

2.British Medical Journal 302 (1991): 887–889

3.BMJ

4.International journal of quality in health care

5.International Journal of Hospital Research

6.IOSR Journals

7.Journal of Hospital Administration

8.Journal of the Academy of Hospital Administration

9.International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance

10.Oxford journals

Websites:

1.http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org.

2.http://www.ama-assn.org

3.http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org

4.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed

5.http://www.memorialhealth.com/outpatient-satisfaction.aspx

6.http://haribalaji.com

7.http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals

APPENDIX

QUESTIONNAIRE

A STUDY ON IN-PATIENT SATISFACTION AT

GLOBAL HOSPITALS AND HEALTH CITY

Dear Sir/Madam,

I, P.V.Gunasekhar Chowdary, student of M.B.A (Hospital and Health System Management), Global College of Allied Health Sciences, affiliated to The TN Dr.M.G.R Medical University pursue research project titled “A STUDY ON IN-PATIENT SATISFACTION AT GLOBAL HOSPITALS AND HEALTH CITY” under the guidance and supervision of Dr. G.Rajasekhar, Medical Director, Global Hospitals and Health City.

As a part of my research work, I would like to collect information from your good self through questionnaire. I kindly request you to fill up this questionnaire by sparing few minutes of your valuable time. I assure you that all the information collected from you will be kept confidential and will be used strictly for the academic purpose only. Please put a tick mark ( ) in the appropriate Column or bracket given.

I.To study the satisfaction of in-patients regarding various services provided at Global Hospitals and Health City

Sl.

Description

Very good

Good

Satisfactory

Poor

Very poor

No

5

4

3

2

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Medical services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

Nursing services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

Diagnostic services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

Dietary services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

Housekeeping services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

Transport

 

 

 

 

 

 

System(Stretcher/ Wheel

 

 

 

 

 

 

chair) promptness

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

Billing

 

 

 

 

 

 

services(Explanation and

 

 

 

 

 

 

counselling)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

Admission services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

Infrastructural facilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

Overall satisfaction derived

 

 

 

 

 

 

from various services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

II. To study the satisfaction of in-patients regarding the behavior and attention of

 

Medical, nursing and supportive staff.

1.

Did the admission staff made you feel welcome?

 

a) Yes

[ ]

b) No [ ]

2.

Are the Nursing staffs pleasant and supportive?

 

a) Yes

[ ]

b) No [ ]

3.

Are the Doctors attentive and spending enough time during their visit?

 

a) Yes

[ ]

b) No [ ]

4.

Do the staffs (Doctors and Nurses) listen to your concerns and complaints promptly?

 

a) Yes

[ ]

b) No [ ]

5.

Do the healthcare providers respect to your right to privacy?

 

a) Yes

[ ]

b) No [ ]

6.

Are the lab and radiology staff caring and helpful during procedures?

 

a) Yes

[ ]

b) No [ ]

7.

Does your Doctor Offer chance to ask questions and be involved in your treatment

 

decisions?

 

 

a) Yes

[ ]

b) No [ ]

8.Do the supportive staffs (Ward boys/ transportation/housekeeping) show courtesy in their behavior?

a) Yes [ ] b) No [ ]

9. Do the guest relations staffs visit regularly and are they respond to your complaints? a) Yes [ ] b) No [ ]

10. Information received by the patients about their condition and treatment from health care

providers

 

a) Adequate [ ]

b) Inadequate [ ]

III. To compare the level of satisfaction perceived by patients admitted in various wards.

 

1.

What’s your opinion about cleanliness and comfort of stay?

 

 

 

 

a) Very Good [

]

b) Good [

]

c) Satisfactory [

]

d) Poor [

]

e) Very Poor [

]

2.

Rate the level of satisfaction you perceived during your stay in your hospital

 

 

a) Very Good [

]

b) Good [

]

c) Satisfactory [

]

d) Poor [

]

e) Very Poor [

]

IV. To evaluate if the pricing has been suitably accepted by the patients.

1.

What is your opinion about cost of consultation?

 

 

 

a) Too high [

]

b) Reasonable [

]

c) Too low [

]

2.

How do you feel about cost of treatment?

 

 

 

 

a) Too high [

]

b) Reasonable [

]

c) Too low [

]

3.

Are the bed charges:

 

 

 

 

 

a) Too high [

]

b) Reasonable [

]

c) Too low [

]

4.

How do you perceive the cost of diagnostic services?

 

 

a) Too high [

]

b) Reasonable [

]

c) Too low [

]

5.

On the basis of the quality of services offered, do you think the fees are?

 

a) Too high [

]

b) Reasonable [

]

c) Too low [

]

PERSONAL DATA

1.Name (optional):

2.Age

 

Below 20 years

[

]

21-40 years

[

]

 

 

41-60years

[

]

above 61 years

[

]

 

3.

Gender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Male

[

]

Female

 

[

]

4.

Marital status

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Married

[

]

Unmarried

 

[

]

5.

Qualification

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Primary

[

]

Secondary

 

[

]

 

Graduate

[

]

Post graduate

 

[

]

6.

Occupation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Employed

[

]

Unemployed

 

[

]

 

Business

[

]

Retired

 

[

]

7.

Annual Family Income

 

 

 

 

 

< 100000

[

]

100001 - 300000

 

[

]

 

300001 - 500000

[

]

> 500000

 

[

]